Are fizzy drinks making you fat?

By admin
19 February 2015

A new campaign is seeking to highlight just how much danger a can of pop a day could do, with claims it raises the risk of dying from heart disease by 33 per cent.

Most of us realise that guzzling down fizzy drinks daily isn't that good for us; apart from anything, they're packed with tooth-rotting sugar. But a new campaign is seeking to highlight just how much danger a can of pop a day could do, with claims it raises the risk of dying from heart disease by 33 per cent.

The movement is called Give Up Loving Pop, or GULP for short, and is the brainchild of the Health Equalities Group with support from the NHS.

'Few people fully realise the harm that sugary drinks can do to your health'

As well as linking fizzy beverages with heart disease, posters detail the effect they can have on your waistline. It's suggested that downing a full-fat can a day could see the scales increase by around 14lbs annually.

"Few people fully realise the harm that sugary drinks can do to your health," Robin Ireland, who directs the campaign, explained.

"As well as damaging your teeth, overconsumption of these drinks can lead to weight gain, type 2 diabetes and poor heart health.

"Given the levels of overweight and obesity... in particular amongst youngsters, unless we start to take action on sugary drinks we will be storing up problems for future generations."

The idea is to get the government doing more, education wise. It's estimated that around 40 per cent of young people drink over three glasses of pop a day, with Robin hoping the campaign will make more realise they could be damaging their health in the long term.

This isn't the first time fizzy drinks have been targeted by health campaigners. Many organisations, including British Dietetic Association and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, have previously backed calls to put a tax on the beverages as a way of discouraging people to opt for them.

But director general of the British Soft Drinks Association, Gavin Partington, has questioned GULP's motives, insisting if the health of humans was really its main concern it would focus on teaching people about a rounded diet rather than fizzy drinks.

It's not all bad news in terms of health though. American researchers are currently testing whether eating dark chocolate might cut high blood pressure, with 120 people taking part.

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