Bafana’s chances: what the psychics say

By admin
28 May 2010

With the Fifa World Cup about to kick off the big question in SA is will Bafana Bafana make their critics eat their words? Instead of consulting soccer experts we put the question to people who claim they can see into the future.

Marietta Theunissen, psychic medium on the kyk-NET show Die Ander Kant, says midfielder Siphiwe Tshabalala will be the team’s strongest link but she fears the team has been pushed too hard physically.

‘‘I see them taking part in about 60 per cent of the tournament. But I don’t see them in the final three games.’’ She sees Portugal with a strong chance of reaching the final.

Marietta doesn’t foresee the tournament having the same unifying effect as the 1995 Rugby World Cup. ‘‘People will give Bafana the support they need but it won’t be as spectacular as it was in 1995.’’

Tash Bassani of Johannesburg, who reads the future in cards, says Bafana will do well under returned coach Carlos Alberto Parreira. ‘‘He has put things right where others have failed – our boys will certainly do us proud.’’ She predicts Bafana may go through to the knockout round. ‘‘The final will be between England and Spain – and the cards favour England.’’

Madeyi (Victoria Mtshengu), a sangoma in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, sees darkness ahead for Bafana because team members haven’t shown respect for their cultural roots.

‘‘A number of things weren’t done properly in the build-up to the tournament – for instance no traditional rituals have been performed. The ancestors are unhappy. I don’t see Bafana winning a single game.’’

Mageza, a sangoma in Johannesburg, threw the bones to find out how Bafana would fare.

‘‘You saw how this bone jumped higher than the others when I threw them. It means the national team is going to jump high and surprise many people. The boys are going to be strong from their first match and will become stronger and stronger.

‘‘That’s what the bones say and the bones don’t lie.’’

Read the full article in the YOU of 3 June 2010

N A few short days the moment South Africans have waited for will finally arrive. The whistle will blow for the kick-off of the 2010 Fifa World Cup and Bafana Bafana will take on Mexico. The country has worked for this for years, looked forward to it for ages, sometimes biting fingernails and agonising about whether it could be pulled off. Now everything is in place and the big moment is here. But there is one more ¬niggling question: will our team come to the ¬party? Of course everyone in the country has fingers crossed that Bafana will silence critics and be on the ball all the way to the final – or at least to the semifinal. But what are their chances realistically? Instead of consulting ¬soccer experts we turned to people who say they can see into the ¬future and asked them to have a go at predicting Bafana’s chances. Marietta Theunissen, psychic medium on the kyk-NET show Die Ander Kant Midfielder Siphiwe Tshabalala will be the strongest link in the team, Marietta says, but she fears the team might have been pushed too hard physically. “I see them taking part in about 60 per cent of the tournament. The build-up will be unbelievable. But I don’t see them in the final three games.” She sees Portugal with a strong chance of playing in the final. On how things will go during the tournament, she says, “I don’t see any threats or blood. The sabotage we experience now is much more than we will see during the event. An incident ¬between spectators at one of the stadiums will give us a fright but the police will quickly defuse the situation. “Petty crime will increase but I don’t foresee any major problems. The police are more than ready.” Marietta doesn’t foresee the tournament having the same unifying effect as the 1995 Rugby World Cup. “People will give Bafana the support they need but it won’t be as spectacular as it was in 1995.”

Tash Bassani, Johannes-burg graphologist and carto¬mancer “Bafana will do very well now that their former coach, Carlos ¬Alberto Parreira, is back. He has put things right where others have failed – our boys will certain¬ly do us proud,” Tash, who predicts the future with cards, says. She foresees Bafana will get close to or even go through to the knockout round. “The final will be between England and Spain – and the cards favour England. They have a very strong team, according to my cards.” The tournament won’t be without incident though. “Unfortunately there will be disruptions by minority groups who can’t really call themselves proud South Africans. We need to be concerned about arms in stadiums. Crime will remain the same but tourists will become more of a target.” The need constantly to be on alert for crime will put a damper on people fully enjoying this wonderful occasion, she says. Tash predicts the overwhelming support for Bafana will bring South ¬Africans closer together and create greater aware¬ness that colour, race and religion should not be divisive. “The Springboks were in a league of their own in 1995; yet Bafana Bafana will have a big impact because all South Africans are more comfortable with one another, whereas in 1995 that was still very new,” she says. She also predicts a difficult time for a player wearing a No 23 green shirt. “Alarm bells ring around this man and it can result from anything – injury, crime, anything. This player must be cautious. It could be a player from Brazil but that’s uncertain, although the number is 23 and the shirt is green, without a doubt.” And, as we all hoped, the tournament will open up many doors for South Africa, with new interest, investors and businesses, Tash says.

Sharon-ann Riley, Cape Town psychic medium and spiritual mediator Dissent in the Bafana camp could cost us dearly, Sharon-Ann warns. “It will be touch and go. “Parreira will have to curb team rivalry before kick-off ¬because it will affect their performance. Yellow cards will be the order of the day. Bafana will have to keep cool heads because hot tempers might jeopardise qualifying for the quarterfinals,” she says. Watch out for the underdogs – they have a few surprises for us. “England and Mexico mustn’t count their chickens before they’ve hatched,” she warns. Sharon-Ann foresees troublemakers could target the important matches, such as the semis and final. “Hang on to your purse because petty theft and burglary will be on the rise espe¬cially towards the end of the World Cup.” Bafana will have an opportunity to create memorable goals but will lose out because of poor teamwork. Watch out for new Beckhams and Pelés coming out of Japan, Greece, Ivory Coast and Honduras. Fans could miss the start of their favourite matches because of unscheduled transport delays, she predicts. A few technological glitches will be experienced but on the whole South Africans will stand together to make a lasting impression.

Madeyi (Victoria ¬Mtshengu), a sangoma of Khayelitsha, Cape Town Madeyi sees only darkness ahead for Bafana because the team members have neglected to show respect for their cultural roots ahead of the tournament. “I see visions of darkness, a sign the future is bleak for the team. A number of things weren’t done properly in the build-up to the tournament – for instance no traditional rituals have been performed. The ancestors are unhappy. I don’t see Bafana winning a single game.” She feels the team would have benefited from traditional rituals if that’s their belief. “We are Africans and should do things the African way. The Nigerian team for instance has cultural beliefs and rituals they perform before a major tournament and it works for them. But at this stage the ancestors are telling me Bafana are in for a disastrous World Cup.” She doesn’t think there’s a chance of the tournament being disrupted by incidents violence or terror. “People from all walks of life will enjoy the matches peacefully. The unemployed will get some jobs and be able to feed themselves and their families,” she predicts.

Mageza, Johannesburg sangoma Mageza got surprising results when he threw the bones to find out how Bafana would fare in the tournament. “One of the bones is a symbol of a man,” he says. “You saw how this bone jumped higher than the others when I threw them. It means the national team is going to jump high and surprise many people. The male bone also means power or strength. The boys are going to be strong from their first match and will become stronger and stronger. “That’s what the bones say and the bones don’t lie,” he says confidently. Bafana will get through to the final but Brazil will win, Mageza’s bones predict. He agrees with Sharon-Ann’s prediction that friction in the team will be a problem. “Some of the Bafana players get weak during the final. There will be friction among the players. The weak players will become jealous of those who are still strong and putting on a good performance. By the time we reach the final our strikers will be a spent force and our defence will be full of holes.” He’s not concerned about safety during the tournament. “Every time I throw the bones I see a herd of elephants guarding an entrance to a homestead. The elephants represent ancestors who will be guardians and protect the people during the World Cup. “There are people with sinister ideas and motives who might try to disrupt the tournament but they won’t succeed. Their intentions and plots will fizzle out.”S

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