Be part of the school fun

By admin
23 August 2013

Our education blogger is reminded of the importance of extramural activities and putting in a little bit more – for teachers and learners.

The happy learners and teachers after the successful revue.

I’m tired. Dead tired. But the revue week has been amazing. The teachers and learners all had fun.

And as the last notes of the revue ends tonight I wipe away a tear and feel sad because it was wow! Then suddenly it is all over.

It makes me think of how valuable extramural activities are at a school. The quiet, withdrawn learner who battles with maths and looks as if she has no self-confidence blossoms on stage where she amazes everyone with her dance steps. Another learner shows us all that he or she can sing like a nightingale.

I teach only one grade but during the revue I got to know learners in other grades. And some of them pop into my office for a chat, ask if they can help with anything or to just give me a chocolate and a hug.

When a teacher deals with learners in sport, culture or social activities at school the humanity of the learners is appreciated and mutual trust is built. The learners also get to know the teacher as a person and realises that strict teacher has another side to her.

And it makes me think of the following delicate matter: at every school (and probably in all other jobs) there are two kinds of staff:

Group 1: Those who are involved and always ready to help and sacrifice their time,

and

Group 2: Those who can’t wait for the bell to ring so they can get into their cars and leave the school grounds as soon as possible.

The sad thing about the Group 2 teachers is that they don’t realise how much they’re missing. And they have the audacity to criticise the staff who work hard and do everything.

Yes, the best player is always on the sidelines.

Staff who aren’t prepared to put in that little extra have so much time on their hands that they use it to sit in the staffroom and gossip and find fault with everything being done at the school.

I hope everyone who reads this can honestly take a look at themselves and decide whether they’re Group 1 or Group 2 people and think about that.

But that’s enough of negative things. I’m grateful for the lovely learners and enthusiastic staff at my school and for the incredible revue time that’s now over.

Thanks to each one of you. I’m sooo proud of you.

Now let me show you a few photographs:

The teachers amazed the learners by performing the song I Will Follow Him.

Rock n roll! And the teacher (in the green shirt) enjoys dancing with the learners.

The main roles: four teachers and five learners.

* Olga Channing is a deputy principal and Afrikaans teacher at a high school in Pretoria. She’s the author of six books for the new school curriculum and after 24 years as a teacher, she still loves her job.

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS FROM OUR EDUCATION BLOGGER:

Six tips for the third term

Parents and teachers are partners – not opponents

Holidays? What holidays?

Blog: Are teachers to blame?

A teacher’s blog: Rise above the average!

Ordinary people with extraordinary heart

 And now we are singing and dancing 

Find Love!

Men
Women