For good measure

By admin
18 October 2013

YOU’s food editor Carmen Niehaus explains how to measure ingredients properly when cooking. Yes, sometimes it is better to use a scale than a measuring cup!

YOU’s food editor Carmen Niehaus explains how to measure ingredients properly when cooking. Yes, sometimes it is better to use a scale than a measuring cup!

  • The volume (ml) and mass (gram) of ingredients aren’t the same, for instance 250 ml sugar = 200 g sugar and 250 ml bran = 30 g bran.  So you can’t randomly convert the measurements. 
  • Dry ingredients must preferably be weighed.  Before weighing ingredients ensure the scale is set on 0 after putting the weighing bowl on top. 
  • Alternatively use measuring cups in different sizes, such as 50 ml, 60 ml, 125 ml and 250 ml, to measure sugar or flour, instead of using a measuring jug with a spout.  Spoon the flour or sugar into the measuring cup until it is overfull and level the excess flour or sugar with a spatula. Don’t press it into the measuring cup or level it with a spoon or your hand.
  1. Water, oil, milk or syrup is measured in a calibrated measuring jug, preferably with a spout.  Fill it to the desired level, checking that it’s correct by looking at the jug from the side.  If you look from the top an error of parallax [an apparent change in position of an object resulting from a change in position of the observer] will be made. 
  • For small quantities, such as leavening agents and essences, use 15 ml, 12 ml, 5 ml, 2 ml and 1 ml measuring spoons.  Level dry ingredients with a spatula.
  • Shortening should preferably be weighed.  A whole brick of margarine or butter can first be lightly marked at the halfway mark before dividing into quarters. 
- Carmen Niehaus:  food editor, YOU Share your thoughts:

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