Game of Thrones's 'R560 000-a-day scene'

By admin
07 October 2014

Game of Thrones bosses reportedly hired over 200 security guards to ensure Lena Headey's controversial nude scene was kept secret.

Game of Thrones bosses reportedly hired over 200 security guards to ensure Lena Headey's controversial nude scene was kept secret. The actress stars as Cersei Lannister in the fantasy drama, which is based on the books by George R. R. Martin. Much has been made of a key season five scene, which sees Cersei emerging naked from a church and having to walk through a town back to the King's Landing castle. It ran into problems when the church in Croatia denied the show access as it didn't want to be associated with nudity. Things were eventually ironed out, with TMZ reporting great lengths were gone to so the shoot was kept secret.

Apparently there were more than 200 security guards present over the four days, plus shop owners had to be paid so their stores could be closed during the sequence

It's claimed series bosses spent R560 000 ($50 000) a day on the filming, with a lot of the money used to ensure there were no leaks. Apparently there were more than 200 security guards present over the four days, plus shop owners had to be paid so their stores could be closed during the sequence.

No one was allowed to bring a cell phone on set, in an effort to stop pictures leaking. Some have made their way onto the internet however, although they mostly just show a sea of extras. In one published on TMZ, Lena can be seen walking up some steps with people all around her.

Confidentiality agreements were also given to everyone involved, stating that anyone who leaked information about the scene could be the subject of a R2,8 million ($250 000) legal action.

Despite the huge amount of people involved, it's thought only four crew members were there when Lena was nude.

The scene is one of the most important in the season, as it shows Cersei being humiliated as she walks through the sea of people.

Fans of the show and books have been waiting for it to hit screens, with Lena previously explaining how much she enjoys hearing what they think of the small-screen adaptation.

"With fantasy and sci-fi, it’s based in a real fandom. You’re presenting to experts, and their source material is really important to them. They’ll come up and ask, 'So when you turned your head slightly in that scene, what were you thinking?’" she told British newspaper The Telegraph.

“I enjoy that, because the battle is over the interpretation, and they’re more interested in the character than they are in you. There’s something cooler about the geek.”

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