Half hour walk each day 'may cut risk of death from cancer'

By YOU
07 June 2017

Researchers discovered that survival rates hugely increase with regular exercise.

Just half an hour of walking a day can increase the likelihood of overcoming cancer by almost half, new research claims.

Two separate investigations into bowel and breast cancer patients have discovered that survival rates hugely increase with regular exercise.

A team from Harvard University followed almost 1,000 men diagnosed with stage three bowel cancer, the second most advanced form which means it’s fast-growing and large, for seven years.

Those men who did just 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week along with following a healthy diet were 42 per cent less likely to succumb to the disease. They also survived for longer if the cancer came back.

Read more: Turn to tomatoes to slow stomach cancer down

In other research carried out by a team at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia almost 200 women who had recently had surgery to remove breast cancer were monitored, with half of the ladies being advised to partake in 180 minutes of moderate exercise a week for eight months minimum. The other participants continued to live as they normally would.

Eight years later it was found that the women who worked out regularly were 55 per cent more likely to still be alive.

Noting most of the patients involved in the studies counted brisk walking as their exercise, experts believe moderate workouts are key to slowing the growth of tumours and reducing levels of hormones which could trigger them to return.

Read more: Teen creates bra that detects breast cancer

“Patients should build up to exercising for at least 150 minutes per week. Doctors absolutely should counsel patients to exercise,” Dr. Erin Van Blarigan, associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco, who aided Harvard academics in the bowel study, said.

The results of this research were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago.

Meanwhile, in regards to the breast cancer study, Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive of the charity Breast Cancer Now, shared, “These preliminary findings add to the increasing body of evidence suggesting that exercise could improve the chances of survival.”

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