'I do what I do best in my job' - SABC chief Hlaudi Motsoeneng

By Shanaaz Prince
14 August 2014

SABC COO Hlaudi Motsoeneng is hellbent on not speaking about "his personal life" and says it's other people's problem if they can get over that.

He’s one of South Africa’s most controversial CEO’s and SABC chief Hlaudi Motsoeneng lived up to his reputation in an interview with YOU at his offices in Johannesburg.

When asked about all the accusations levelled at him – from the fact he has no matric qualification to the fact Venda tradition leaders offered him a wife and cow – he bristled.

He deemed the questions “part of his personal life” and says he has no obligation to answer. “Those are not my challenges, those are people's challenges," he says.

“I do what I do best in my job and I make sure that my family is taken care of. People will talk and with that I am not concerned. It's none of my business and I guess that's just in the nature of people – to talk.

“I'm not even going to go there. I am here to concentrate on my job. I am going to focus on the SABC only and not my personal life.”

Well, there’s the one exception – the father of three says his kids are supportive of his job.

He’s positive about the future of the state broadcaster, Motsoeneng says. “I see a lot of positivity but it will take a concerted team effort – from the heads [of divisions] to the cleaners”.

Motsoeneng started his career as a freelancer then became a permanent employee at the SABC in 2005. Photo: MDUDUZI NDZINGI Motsoeneng started his career as a freelancer then became a permanent employee at the SABC in 2005. Photo: MDUDUZI NDZINGI

Motsoeneng started his career as a freelancer then became a permanent employee at the SABC in 2005. He was dismissed in 2007 while working at radio station Lesedi FM due to an apparent falling out with the CEO.

"I do not focus on history, the past is in the past,” he says when asked about it. “If you want to know about that, you can go check on Google.”

Things are looking up for the SABC, he says, both with regards to revenue, audiences and financially and that things would only get better as long as they continue to work as a team.

"As long as I deliver, we will do well," he says.

"Financially we are healthy, the key is to have one strategy for the SABC. In the past, there were different strategies for the different divisions and now our strategy should focus on the SABC as a whole, that includes everyone, even the cleaners.

“People aren't silos, we need to work as a team. The environment we work in needs to be conducive. If we are doing well financially, we need to reward people. If they work hard, we need to give them recognition.

“People are coming back to the SABC because they are seeing the changes."

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