Late retirement = better health in old age

By admin
10 December 2016

A late retirement may be the key to staying active for longer, a new report suggests.

Britain’s Chief Medical Officer Professor Sally Davies believes that those who are approaching retirement may want to consider putting it off until after their late 60s, as continuing work boosts overall health.

As medicine progresses people are living longer and remaining in good shape later in life, which she suggests people take advantage of, and those who do choose to retire should keep busy with a hobby or volunteering.

Read more: These unhealthy habits could shave years off your life

In a major report being published on Thursday, Professor Davies explains: “People are living longer than ever and so retirement presents a real opportunity for baby-boomers to be more active than ever before. For many people it is a chance to take on new challenges, it is certainly not the start of a slower pace of life it once was.

“Staying in work, volunteering or joining a community group can make sure people stay physically and mentally active for longer. The health benefits of this should not be underestimated.”

The average retirement age for men is 65 and for women it’s 63, which is when they can claim a state pension. In four years time (2020) it will be 66 for everyone.

Read more: Middle-aged men without friends at risk of health problems 

While Professor Davies is encouraging the older generation to continue working, The Department of Health points out that she isn’t pressuring people to stay in their job if they do wish to retire in their 60s.

There are some downsides to giving up work though as it can lead to social isolation, as Paul Green of Saga, insurance for over 50s, explains: “For many people, the abolition of the Default Retirement Age was a blessing as it allowed them to work longer and enjoy the social, physical and mental well-being that it gave them.

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“In fact, there are now more than 1.24 million over-65s who have taken advantage of the changes and remain in work, a 48 per cent increase since 2011. However, for some, the idea of working until they're 70 fills them with dread.”

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