Nicole Simpson’s sister talks about O.J. murder case

By Petro-Anne Vlok
13 March 2014

Tanya Brown opens up about her sister Nicole Brown Simpson’s murder 20 years later, writing in her new memoir about how O.J. Simpson phoned her family as he led police in a slow-speed car chase

The trauma and constant media scrutiny that dominated Tanya Brown’s life after the brutal murder of her sister Nicole Brown Simpson had a profound impact on the then 24-year-old. In the years that followed, she battled with depression, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, and almost took her own life as she struggled to work through the ordeal. Simpson watches his former defense attorney Yale Galanter testify during an evidentiary hearing in Clark County District Court on May 17, 2013 in Las Vegas

Now 20 years after the murder, Brown opens up about the painful event in her memoir Finding Peace Amid the Chaos: Escape from Depression and Suicide. Brown (44) describes how she and her family watched aghast as Simpson’s bloody corpse was loaded into a mortuary van. She held her mother’s shaking hands as she cried: “That’s my kid.” Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman were found stabbed to death at her Los Angeles home in June 1994. Simpson’s ex-husband, former football player O.J. Simpson whom she divorced in 1992, was the prime suspect. But Brown says initially she couldn't believe he was guilty.

Brown says initially she couldn't believe he was guilty

On the day Simpson was supposed to hand himself over to the police, he led them in a peculiar, slow-speed car chase that was broadcast live. What most people don’t know, says Brown, is that Simpson called her family during the chase. Her father and sister Denise spoke to him over the phone, trying to convince him not to take his own life. She recalls: “‘Don't do it, Juice!’ Daddy urged him, trying to get him to put the gun down and pull over. ‘Think of your two kids, Juice! Don't do it!’.” Tanya Brown, sister of Nicole Brown Simpson, holds a candle during a vigil for victims of domestic violence, Oct. 18, 1997, in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.  PHOTO: AP Photo/Patsy Lynch Tanya Brown, sister of Nicole Brown Simpson, holds a candle during a vigil for victims of domestic violence, Oct. 18, 1997, in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. PHOTO: AP Photo/Patsy Lynch Simpson later surrendered to the police. While behind bars, he phone Brown telling her that he loved her sister and would “have taken a bullet for her”. When Simpson blamed his wife for the breakdown of their marriage, Brown told him that her sister had dedicated her life to him. He then hung up on her. “I slammed the phone down and I cried. It was at that moment that I could no longer deny the suspicions that so many others had,” Brown say. “At that moment, I knew what he had done to my sister.”

He phone Brown telling her that he loved her sister and would “have taken a bullet for her”

Simpson’s live-televised trial lasted one year and was describes as the trial of the century. In 1995 he was quitted of murdering his ex-wife and Goldman. For Brown, the tragedy didn’t end there and her life spiralled out of control as she was gripped by depression and drug and alcohol abuse. But she’s managed to turn this “ugly thing into something good”. Today she’s a counselling psychologist and motivation speaker who campaigns for mental health. In 2008 Simpson was involved in another run-in with the law. He was found guilty of kidnapping, armed robbery and other charges. He still needs to serve at least for more years in prison. SOURCES: people.com, dailymail.co.uk

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