Nonregistered motorists beware

By admin
27 November 2013

A hefty bill awaits nonregistered motorists without e-toll accounts who fail to pay their e-tolls within a week.

 

Such an individual would have to pay nearly six times more in toll fees, according to the website of the South African National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral).

Sanral says tariffs differ depending on whether motorists have both an e-toll account and an e-tag, or have an e-tag without an e-toll account.

Those without both would pay much more. Motorists with e-toll accounts are registered, and those without are nonregistered.

If a driver with a VW (Class A2) doesn’t have an e-toll account and an e-tag, and their daily trip consists of passing the Barbet e-toll gantry on the N1 between Watermeyer and Lynnwood Road, they’ll have to pay R3,48, according to the website.

"However, if he does not pay within seven days of passing the Barbet e-toll gantry, he will be classified as an alternative user and would need to pay R10,44," says Sanral.

A registered e-tag user with the same vehicle, driving the same stretch of road will pay R1,80 if they paid within a week of passing the gantry, their e-toll account was up to date, and they qualified for the "time-of-day" and "frequent-user" discount.

A registered vehicle licence number (VLN) user driving the same vehicle on the same stretch of road will pay R3,48 because they don’t have an e-tag.

"Because he is registered, is paying within seven days of passing the Barbet e-toll gantry, and his e-toll account is up-to-date, he qualifies for the time-of-day discount," said Sanral on the website.

A nonregistered e-tag user will pay R3,48 with the same vehicle on the same stretch of road.

The agency said should a road user not have an e-toll account, or a day pass, the motorist can pay within a seven-day grace period from the time they passed the gantry.

-Sapa

Find Love!

Men
Women