Red meat rules

By admin
27 May 2013

The price of red meat might be going up but this doesn’t deter committed meat lovers from buying steaks and chops.

Handle it with care to make the very best of it:

Good to know: 

DRY HEAT

Cuts from the beef hindquarter are tender and juicy and can be cooked with dry-heat methods. Liquid is not added and the meat is cooked with direct heat, for instance grilling, pan-frying or roasting. Roasting at 160 °C is suitable for cuts of more than 1,5 kg. The meat is cooked uncovered. Roasting Times: Rare: 15-20 minutes for every 500 g plus 15 minutes. Medium: 20-25 minutes for every 500 g plus 20 minutes.

MOIST HEAT

Beef forequarter cuts contain more bone and white connective tissue than hindquarter cuts, making them more flavoursome. To ensure they are tender they must be cooked slowly with moist-heat methods such as stewing, braising, pot-roasting and cooking in a bag. Liquid is added and the meat is covered. Pot-roasting (on top of the stove) and cooking in a baking bag are suitable for cuts of more than 1,5 kg. Heat the oven to 160 °C and roast for 45-50 minutes for every 500 g plus 40 minutes extra.

FRY,THEN STEW

Brown stewing steak cubes in oil first. Do not put all the meat in the saucepan in one go because this reduces the temperature too rapidly, causing the juices to escape and the meat to dry out.

THAW WITH CARE

Defrost meat slowly in the fridge so the juices are re-absorbed. Don’t thaw in warm water or in the sun because the juices will escape.

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