Should you share pictures of your children online?

By admin
17 July 2014

First it was only the likes of Rihanna who were rapped over the knuckles by Instagram for their naked photographs, but now the debate about what may be shared on the social network has reached boiling point after a London mother’s page was shut down because of an “inappropriate” picture of her 19-month-old daughter.

First it was only the likes of Rihanna who were rapped over the knuckles by Instagram for their naked photographs, but now the debate about what may be shared on the social network has reached boiling point after a London mother’s page was shut down because of an “inappropriate” picture of her 19-month-old daughter.

In the picture the toddler, Marlow, is lifting her dress to look at her belly button, and her stomach and upper body are exposed, Metro UK reports.

Marlow’s mom, 33-year-old Courtney Adamo, was shocked the next day to find her picture had been removed by Instagram. Courtney posted the picture again and her Instagram page was closed down.

The Globe and Mail reported earlier this year that Canadian mother Heather Bays’ Instagram page was closed down after she’d posted a picture of herself breastfeeding.

Here are a few tips for moms on the web:

  • Never post naked pictures of your children. You may think they’re innocent but sexual criminals could misuse the pictures.
  • Turn off the GPS function on your apps so your location won’t be made public when you share a picture. This protects you and your children.
  • Make sure your profile can be seen only by your friends, and don’t post pictures of your children where they can be seen by the public, for example as your profile picture.
  • Remember, pictures that are cute when your children are small could later be humiliating for them. Think how your children would feel if they saw later in life what pictures of them you shared.
  • Be careful about sharing pictures of your friends’ children. The fact you feel okay about it doesn’t mean your friends do.
  • Be considerate where your friends are concerned. Don’t announce online their unborn baby’s name or gender, post pictures of the christening or make entries on their baby without their permission.
  • Guard against making your children’s names known on social media. This can create safety risks.
  • Remember, it’s useless to try to teach your children to be responsible on social media and not make their every move known if you make all your moves known.

-Mieke Vlok

Sources: Metro UK, telegraph.co.uk, globeandmail.com, moms.popsugar.com, babyzone.com

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