Tori Spelling plans on telling kids about dad’s affair

By admin
05 December 2014

The former Beverly Hills, 90210 actress has opened up her life for the cameras in Lifetime reality show True Tori.

And while the series explores difficult subjects, such as her husband Dean McDermott’s infidelity, Tori insists she likes the new way people see their life together.

Tori also opened up about how her children, seven-year-old Liam, six-year-old Stella, two-year-old Finn and one-year-old Hattie, have been coping with their parents’ relationship issues.

While the quartet know nothing about their father’s affair, Tori reveals she has no issue informing them of Dean’s indiscretion when they get older.

"When they're adults I have no problem going back to them and telling them what happened - they don’t know about the affair," she said. "I want to be able to sit down with them at one point and say, 'Dad and I had a really hard year, we worked on our relationship and we survived it. We're survivors and we're still together and we're happier and stronger than we were. And we documented our lives because we thought it could help others and this was our process.'"

Tips on communicating with your kids:

  • Ask your kids about their day to establish a sound communication channel.
  • Make it a two-way discussion by asking questions and their opinion.
  • Quiet time like car trips are ideal for talking-time with your kids.
  • Start conversations by using their name. This will alert them to your attention and make them feel wanted.
  • Keep it simple – long and complicated explanations can be confusing, especially for children.
  • Keep conversations private and have them when others aren’t around – your child is likely to open up more if it’s just you two.
  • Make sure the conversation is age-appropriate for your child.
  • Give them information instead of opinions. Ask them how the information makes them feel or what they think about it, instead of telling them how they should feel or that it is a good or bad thing.
  • Be available and don’t only talk when it suits you – be attentive to your children and notice when they are trying to engage in conversation. Place the emphasis on your child’s emotion and not your own.

Sources: childdevelopmentinfo.com, kidshealth.org, Cover Media, askdrsears.com, apa.org, 

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