Want to help a jackal pup?

By admin
12 November 2015

Looking for a “unique and meaningful” Christmas present for a loved one? An animal rehabilitation centre might have just what you need.

In its appeal for sponsorships for animals, the Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife (Crow), a non-profit, has created the sponsoring of an animal project to assist with the upbringing of four black-backed jackal pups that were rescued in September. The two male and two females pups are amongst the over 400 injured and orphaned animals that have been rescued and admitted to the Crow centre over the past six weeks. They were discovered by cane cutters on a sugarcane farm in the Empangeni area after their den collapsed. After waiting to see if their mother would return, the farmer contacted Crow’s local depot where assistance was on hand.

'Lots of people do it as a family, individually - even companies come on board'

Speaking to News24 on Thursday, Crow director Claire Hodgkinson said the organisation was rallying behind the “sponsor an animal” programme.

“Basically this entails you paying a monthly donation for the cost of that particular animal. You would pay for expenses such as medical and food.

“From Crow we provide sponsorship certificates and give the sponsor an up-to-date progress of the animal. It is a great programme that we have and many other charities embark on projects such as this.

“It also makes for unique and meaningful Christmas gifts. Lots of people do it as a family, individually - even companies come on board.”

‘They are growing fast’

These four black backed jackal pups (2 males and 2 females) are amongst the over 400 injured and orphaned animals that have been rescued and admitted to the CROW centre over the past 6 weeks. PHOTO: facebook.com/crow.kzn These four black backed jackal pups (2 males and 2 females) are amongst the over 400 injured and orphaned animals that have been rescued and admitted to the CROW centre over the past 6 weeks. PHOTO: facebook.com/crow.kzn

Hodgkinson said the rate at which the pups were growing was “extremely fast”.

“They have been drinking lots of milk and are now turning to meat which we will have to supply them. We are desperately appealing because the maintenance for them is quite high.”

Hodgkinson added that although the pups were not rare, they were a less common occurrence for Crow.

“Even though we have had them before, it is not as common for us to find jackal pups. We have found them once before. One of the challenges with this animal is habitat loss.

“They are predators who mostly live in the more remote rural areas. Conflict arises between themselves and farmers as they prey on chickens or other farm animals.”

- If you hope to sponsor any of the pups or any other animal, visit crowkzn.co.za.

News24

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