Wave bye-bye to bloating

By admin
03 December 2014

The most common cause of bloating is eating too quickly. Here's how to reduce that uncomfortable feeling.

Is the enjoyment of eating a meal ruined for you because of a horrible bloated feeling? It’s easy for you to want to lie down on a bed and not get up again until you feel lighter when this uncomfortable sensation hits, which can leave your tummy sore and sensitive.

It needn’t be this way though and a few small, simple changes can make the problem a thing of the past.

Read on to see how you can leave your swollen belly behind and button up your trousers after a big dinner with ease.

The most common cause of bloating is eating too quickly. As well as guzzling down on food, your body is taking in gas-producing air, which can result in your belly ballooning. And then there’s the problem of not chewing properly, which ends badly, too.

“When you eat in a rush, you don’t chew thoroughly, and that leads to larger food pieces sitting in your gut, waiting to be fully digested,” New York City nutritionist Stephanie Middleberg, RD, of Middleberg Nutrition, explained to time.com.

Your brain takes around 20 minutes to process feeling full, so scoffing stuff down may result in you eating more than you should, all the more adding to bloating.

If you’re having a can of soda with every meal, this contributes to feeling bloated as the bubbles cause your stomach to swell. Stephanie suggests leaving a can or bottle open for a while before taking a swig so the fizziness isn’t as extreme and points out that diet sodas can be more harmful in this case, with artificial sweeteners proving difficult to digest.

Kale is another offender as it’s packed full of fibre and sugar called raffinose which are hard to digest and bring on puffiness if not broken down properly. Avoid having it raw if you do want to incorporate it into your diet and the same going for broccoli and Brussels sprouts.

“Cut down on the bloating by eating less kale and cooking the kale you do eat by steaming or roasting it,” Stephanie advised.

Eating dinner close to when you go to bed is not a wise choice; it’ll leave you feeling lethargic and piling on the weight in your sleep. Best-case scenario is having your meal around three hours before you hit the hay and try to stay on your feet in the lead-up to going to bed. If you do get peckish after dinner, snack on a piece or fruit or yoghurt rather than anything carb-heavy.

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