Young binge-eaters are at risk of drug abuse

By admin
07 June 2014

Obesity and diabetes are just two of the health risks faced by kids who binge-eat. Now a new study shows children who overeat are also more likely to start using drugs than those who don’t.

Obesity and diabetes are just two of the health risks faced by kids who binge-eat. Now a new study shows children who overeat are also more likely to start using drugs than those who don’t.

A recent study conducted at Boston Children’s Hospital in the US surveyed about 17 000 kids over nine years. It concluded that children who regularly binged were almost three times more likely to start using drugs.

Dr Kendrin Sonneville, the study’s lead author, says the increased risk of drug use is probably due to impulsive behaviour, the same kind of temperament that causes children to binge-eat. She suggests that irregular eating behaviour needs to be monitored in children and attended to long before eating starts to affect a child’s weight. Parents often wait to see weight gain before they take action, but seeking advice from a dietician beforehand might prevent problems later.

Get moving

If you’re worried about your child and obesity, it’s time to get active. Climbing five floors of stairs five times a week will burn an average of 1 268 kilojoules. Look for easy was to be more active during the day.

Fabulous fibre

Pectin in apples helps detox your digestive tract. Pears, bananas, citrus fruits, carrots and cabbage also contain this fibre.

Top marks for tuna

Perfect to add to your summer salad, tuna has a wealth of health benefits. It’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which play a major role in lowering cholesterol levels and help to protect against conditions such as hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and depression. Tuna is also high in protein and vitamin B, which means it’s great for boosting energy levels. Every can of tuna also contains just less than 1 mg of vitamin B6 which encourages the production of the happy hormone serotonin. But beware not to eat fresh tuna too often as it could have high levels of mercury.

Tomatoes ward off woes

Worried that you child is eating away their sorrows? Add tomatoes to their diet and you could help decrease the risk of depression. Lycopene, an antioxidant that gives tomatoes their red colour, has already been found to help reduce the risk of prostate cancer and heart attacks and now seems to have stress-reducing properties. Researchers at Tianjin Medical University in China analysed the mental health records and diet habits of about 1 000 men and women and found that those who ate tomatoes two to six times a week were 46 per cent less likely to suffer from depression than those who ate them less than once a week.

Sources: health24.com, archpedi.jamanetwork.com, jad-journal.com, bmj.com, info.gov.za, livestrong.com, roehampton.ac.uk

Find Love!

Men
Women