News24

UN puts sanctions on DRC rebels

2012-11-21 07:48

New York - The UN Security Council voted unanimously on Tuesday to sanction the leaders of Congo's M23 rebel force, which hours earlier occupied the eastern Congolese city of Goma as UN peacekeepers stood by without resisting.

But it did not name two countries accused by DRC of supporting the rebels: Rwanda and Uganda.

The council demanded that the M23 rebels withdraw from Goma, disarm and disband, and insisted on the restoration of the crumbing Congolese government authority in the country's turbulent East.

The resolution adopted imposes targeted sanctions, including a travel ban and assets freeze, on the M23 rebel group leadership. Individual nations are supposed to enforce the sanctions and report to the council.

The resolution also calls for an immediate end to external support to the rebels and asks the UN secretary-general to report on the allegations of foreign support while expressing its readiness to take appropriate measures.

It took the rare step in a resolution of singling out two M23 commanders by name: Innocent Kaina and Baudouin Ngaryu, and called for the council's sanctions committee to review their activity and unnamed other individuals.

Unnamed in the resolution were Rwanda and Uganda, which have been identified as supporters of the M23 rebellion by a UN panel of experts' report due out Friday that has been leaked to some media.

Human Rights Watch said on Tuesday that an advance copy of the report that it has reviewed names Rwanda and Uganda as supporting M23.

External support

"Sadly, this resolution fails to name Rwandan officials known by the UN to have supported M23's atrocities from day one," said the UN director for Human Rights Watch, Philippe Bolopion. "Despite its influence on Rwanda, in public the US government has been inexplicably silent," he added.

Congolese special envoy Serahin Ngwei accused Rwanda of arming the M23 and providing troops to back them in his speech to the council.

Rwanda's representative spoke to the council after the vote to deny that his country is involved in the Congolese rebellion. Uganda has previously denied involvement.

Without naming Rwanda or Uganda, the resolution said the council was worried that "external support continues to be provide to the M23, including through troop reinforcement, tactical advice and the supply of equipment, causing a significant increase of the military abilities of the M23".

It condemns M23 for attacking civilians, the UN personnel and humanitarian relief workers, and accused M23 of "summary executions, sexual and gender based violence and large scale recruitment and use of child soldiers".

The resolution calls on "all actors" to use their influence on M23 "to bring about an end to attacks".

Over the weekend, the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called Rwandan President Paul Kagame to ask him to intervene and stop the M23 offensive, according to a statement issued at the UN headquarters in New York.

New resolution

Ban also spoke on Sunday to Uganda's president Museveni, it said. Museveni, in his capacity as chairperson of the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region, indicated that he had spoken to the M23 rebels and called for calm.

On Wednesday the Security Council will review the mandate of the UN peacekeeping force in DRC, named Monusco, which has an authorised strength of 22 000 uniformed personnel, but now has a total of 19 100 in the country including 17 700 military and 1 400 international police. The new resolution asks the UN chief to recommend possible redeployment, and possible "additional force multipliers".

At least 1 500 UN peacekeepers in Goma stood by as the M23 swept in to avoid triggering a battle, a UN spokesperson said on Tuesday.

The peacekeepers "cannot substitute for the efforts of national forces" in Goma, a city of 1 million, said the deputy spokesperson for the secretary-general, Eduardo del Buey.

A Congolese military spokesperson has expressed frustration over the lack of action by the peacekeepers.

But del Buey said the decision was made on the ground by the UN force commander. "There has to be a value judgment made," he said. "Do you open fire and put civilians at risk, or do you hold your fire, continue your patrols, observe what's happening and remind the M23 that they are subject to international humanitarian and human rights law?"

The U.N. troops, operating under the name Monusco, still hold the airport, del Buey said.

Comments
  • faizieishlah.shabalala - 2012-11-21 08:35

    Oh cool. And this will stop the rape of women and children in Goma. Send them a "Get Well Card" instead

  • christi.roestorff - 2012-11-21 09:15

    What are sanctions going to achieve? This is pointless ineffective posturing! Do yourself a favor and read Shake hands with the Devil by Romeo Dallaire.

  • ModernMetaphysicist - 2012-11-21 10:31

    M23 should be dealt with swift and harshly, add the sanctions too for the Leaders and send ground forces to deal with these Barbaric M23 troops, how many more civilians have to Die before the UN will assist, cmon UN do your Job

  • shaun.mossop.3 - 2012-11-21 10:33

    Cant just start a fight in a city with a population of 1 million, Better to move back and fight them some where else.

  • pages:
  • 1