Amazon forest was transformed by ancient people: study

2017-02-07 16:39
This picture from the University of Exeter shows a geoglyph built in the western Brazilian Amazon that had been concealed for centuries by the rainforest. (Jenny Watling, University of Exeter, AFP)

This picture from the University of Exeter shows a geoglyph built in the western Brazilian Amazon that had been concealed for centuries by the rainforest. (Jenny Watling, University of Exeter, AFP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Miami -Long before European settlers arrived in the Americas in 1492, the Amazon rainforest was transformed for thousands of years by indigenous people who carved mysterious circles into the landscape, researchers say.

While the purpose of these hundreds of ditched enclosures, or geoglyphs, remains unclear, scientists say they may have served as ritual gathering places.

Modern deforestation - coupled with aerial photographs of the landscape - helped reveal some 450 of these geoglyphs in Acre state in the western Brazilian Amazon.

Defensive reasons

"The fact that these sites lay hidden for centuries beneath mature rainforest really challenges the idea that Amazonian forests are 'pristine ecosystems,'" said lead author Jennifer Watling, a post-doctoral researcher at the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at the University of Sao Paulo.

The research is based on state-of-the-art techniques used to reconstruct some 6 000 years of vegetation and fire history around two geoglyph sites.

Watling, who did the research while studying at the University of Exeter, said the findings show the area was not - contrary to popular belief - untouched by humans in the past.

Forest degradation

"Our evidence that Amazonian forests have been managed by indigenous peoples long before European contact should not be cited as justification for the destructive, unsustainable land-use practiced today," she added.

"It should instead serve to highlight the ingenuity of past subsistence regimes that did not lead to forest degradation and the importance of indigenous knowledge for finding more sustainable land-use alternatives."

Read more on:    us
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/News
Traffic Alerts
Traffic
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.