Ban infant formula - Motsoaledi

Cape Town - Infant milk formula is "no different from skin lightening creams" and should be banned worldwide, Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi said on Thursday.

He said at the launch of a Human Sciences Research Council report on children and HIV: "I think throughout the world it was a very good idea to taper down the advertisement of infant feeding formulas.

"I think they must be banned altogether - throughout the whole world," he said, adding that he might propose the idea during discussion of the millennium development goals at the World Health Assembly next week.

One of the goals relates to infant mortality.

"When this is brought (up), because I know it's on the agenda, one would bring (up) these issues of infant feeding, because it's one of the key issues.

"If there's a move to ban infant formulas, I'll be one of the people to support it," he said.

Motsoaledi said there was always argument over the best method of feeding a child.

"But we know that breastfeeding is by far the best - all around the world nothing can ever beat breastfeeding."

If there were exceptions, they should be dealt with.

Boycott

He knew he would shock people with his proposed ban, but formulas are "no different from skin lightening creams", which are banned in South Africa.

He emphasised that he was talking about milk substitute formulas, not other baby foods.

Motsoaledi, who at one time worked as a doctor in rural areas, said he knew that in those areas, women sought the slightest excuse to not breastfeed.

The World Health Organisation recommends that in most cases babies should be breastfed exclusively for the first six months.

In the mid-1970s, advocacy groups launched a worldwide boycott of Swiss formula producer Nestlé, accusing it of using unethical methods of promoting infant formula over breastmilk to poor mothers in developing countries.

The advertising of infant formula has been banned in the UK in recognition of the importance of breastfeeding since 1995.
We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Nappies, they cost too much
6% - 155 votes
Formula and food, it's getting so expensive
18% - 457 votes
Creche and school fees are a struggle every month
75% - 1873 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
16.15
+0.1%
Rand - Pound
19.90
-0.7%
Rand - Euro
16.85
-0.4%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.26
-0.6%
Rand - Yen
0.13
-0.2%
Gold
1,822.54
+0.6%
Silver
21.60
+2.3%
Palladium
2,025.00
+4.0%
Platinum
946.50
+0.2%
Brent Crude
111.22
+3.4%
Top 40
62,496
+0.8%
All Share
69,212
+0.8%
Resource 10
71,854
+1.5%
Industrial 25
77,093
+0.1%
Financial 15
15,933
+1.2%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE