The dagga debate

As one who uses neither cannabis nor tobacco products I felt spurred to respond to the letter from Yagyah Adams on Tuesday 25 September regarding the decriminalisation of dagga (“Decriminalising dagga not welcome”, People’s Post).

Sir, you make several questionable statements in your emotionally charged letter but it is the error in the very first sentence that invalidates the rest of it. You used the word “addiction” when that word should have been one synonymous with “usage” or “partaking of”.

So, when I, and many others, have a meal we may – or not – have a glass of wine or perhaps a beer with it. If we do so it doesn’t make us addicts, as your words suggest.

I do agree with you, however, that those addicted to any mind-altering drugs add no value to families or to society, but don’t blame it on the drugs. Just as one can’t blame shootings on the guns themselves.

The fault lies with dysfunctional people and any restrictions that you would like to see imposed will not solve that problem­.

Philip Greenlees Pinelands

As one who uses neither cannabis nor tobacco products I felt spurred to respond to the letter from Yagyah Adams on Tuesday 25 September regarding the decriminalisation of dagga (“Decriminalising dagga not welcome”, People’s Post).

Sir, you make several questionable statements in your emotionally charged letter but it is the error in the very first sentence that invalidates the rest of it. You used the word “addiction” when that word should have been one synonymous with “usage” or “partaking of”.

So, when I, and many others, have a meal we may – or not – have a glass of wine or perhaps a beer with it. If we do so it doesn’t make us addicts, as your words suggest.

I do agree with you, however, that those addicted to any mind-altering drugs add no value to families or to society, but don’t blame it on the drugs. Just as one can’t blame shootings on the guns themselves. The fault lies with dysfunctional people and any restrictions that you would like to see imposed will not solve that problem­.

Philip Greenlees Pinelands
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