Photos: Carbon-neutral scooter safari

 
 
 
  • Africa’s southern most forest is surprisingly hard to find, hidden in a valley, it tries its very hardest to look like part of the landscape. We raced against the setting sun, arriving at nightfall at the forest camp in the heart of the indigenous forest – home to a tangled web of stinkwoods, wild pears, olives and even 1000 year old milkwoods.
  • After two days of non-stop rain there was no delaying our departure – we faced 65 knot winds and torrential rain but the road was calling us.
  • As most adventurers will attest, the Malgas ferry is the most unusual route across the Breede River – the last hand-drawn ferry in South Africa, it’s slow, but surprisingly effective.
  • De Kelder, one of the Western Cape’s most promising whale-watching spots, didn’t reveal any whales despite our concerted efforts to spot one, so we stopped for a snack of dried pineapple from the Natural Way Cafe and chatted to random passersby. Incredibly, this led to the sponsorship of our Bluetooth communication kit.
  • Enveloped by a milkwood forest, one of only ten of its kind in the world, at Grootbos Nature Reserve, which aims to plant 10 000 trees in the next few years as part of its conservation drive.
  • Even sand proves no obstacle as we drive up to Die Dam to get the best views, en-route to De Hoop Nature Reserve
  • South Africa’s rural landscapes are so jaw-droppingly beautiful, we had to stop and take a moment to appreciate the incredible views around us.
  • Surrounded by the Walker Bay region’s dramatically diverse fynbos, we drove up narrow farm roads to the Koedeberg Centre for Appropriate Rural Technology, where we’d come to share knowledge and insights of permaculture in action.
  • We joined decades of road trippers with a stop at the iconic Ronnie’s Sex Shop, a bar just off the R62 that looks like it belongs in the Wild West.
  • Where the cold Benguela current of the Atlantic Ocean meets the warm Agulhas current of the Indian Ocean, Cape Agulhas (once known as the Cape of Storms) is the site of over 250 shipwrecks and the southernmost tip of Africa. We stopped for the now-obligatory photo before heading out to De Hoop Nature Reserve.