African penguins

2019-05-30 06:01
African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town.

African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town.

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A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town soon.

The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season which is between May and September.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape.

Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild.

“The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town from the last week of May. The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season from May to September 2019.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape.

Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild. “The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town soon.

The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season which is between May and September.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape.

Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild.

“The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town soon.

The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season which is between May and September.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape. Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild.

“The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town soon.

The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season which is between May and September.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape.

Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild.

“The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town soon.

The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season which is between May and September.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape.

Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild.

“The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

A well-anticipated research project identified as the African Penguin Movement Ecology Research will start at Boulders Penguin Colony in Simon’s Town soon.

The project will take place over the African penguin breeding season which is between May and September.

“The study is being led by the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology from the University of Cape Town and the South African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob). The partnership will see a collaboration between these two organisations and South African National Parks (SANParks) Cape Research Centre to conduct the study,” says Dr Alison Kock, marine biologist at the Cape Research Centre.

About 30 penguins will be tagged over the breeding season, with batches of six birds per sampling period, for the maximum of two days. Adult penguins will be fitted with electronic loggers that record their movements through a Global Positioning System (GPS) locations, and will also record their dive depths as well as video footage of their behaviour at sea. These devices will be attached to their lower backs with waterproof tape.

Another method that will be used during the study is a small sample of birds that will be marked with a non-permanent pink dye so that their nest attendance times can be monitored, as well as to choose birds that are going to the sea the following day.

Kock goes on to state that African penguins have dramatically declined over the last century with only an estimated 23 000 breeding pairs remaining in the wild.

“The findings of this research project will assist the scientists to better understand the types of fish the African penguins eat, in order to help manage fish stocks more sustainably; determine their hunting areas that can be used to motivate for the extensions of marine protected areas; and knowing where they go can help limit threats to these areas, such as pollution,” Kock explained.

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