Carnival of Cape Town splendour for all to enjoy

2019-01-31 06:21

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The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again this year, in the event’s 10th anniversary.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Media24’s Nasdak roof, 50 days to the carnival.

Since it launch, the carnival has attracted thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate diverse cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour.

Jay Douwes said: “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine! A call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be.” Douwes is Cape Town Carnival CEO .

Rachel Jafta, founder of the carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

She added: “The event has since become a global event, with people travelling from other provinces and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival.

Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.”

Mayor Dan Plato said it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, the townships and the City as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour.

“This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together. “It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.”

“We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.

Award-winning artist and arts curator Khanyisile Mbongwa, who is assisting the Carnival team, said: “Cape Town Carnival occupies a unique space and role, communicating through the language of the carnivalesque, which is a combination of creativity, exaggeration, colour and spectacle at the intersection of social commentary and celebration. This is really important. We have a difficult history in this country and this city and we cannot do things without asking ourselves serious questions. This year, the carnival asks those questions. The freedom to play, the time to play, and the opportunity to play: these have been politically and socially denied to many South Africans for a long time, making play a political act. Carnival asserts the right to play. The Carnival provides a vehicle for residents to reclaim the city.”

Dunisani Chabalala, deputy director of the National Department of Arts and Culture says they are proud to be associated with the event and hoped it would become a flagship initiative as part of the department.

Lead performer Nonkoliseko Samagu said carnival gave her the outlet to express herself through art and dance. She said she was excited to be part of the initiative every year because it not only helps her, but also gives her an outlet to help others through an organisation she has started.

The sponsors of the 2019 Cape Town Carnival are Multichoice, the City of Cape Town, the National Department of Arts and Culture, the National Lotteries Commission, Kfm, the Western Cape Government, Tsogo Sun, Media24, the Western Cape Tourism, Trade and Investment Agency (Wesgro), Business and Arts South Africa (BASA), Peninsula Beverages, and Gearhouse.

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar.

The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play.

That is what the theme represents.

A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another.

“Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.Award-winning artist and arts curator Khanyisile Mbongwa, who is assisting the Carnival team, said: “Cape Town Carnival occupies a unique space and role, communicating through the language of the carnivalesque, which is a combination of creativity, exaggeration, colour and spectacle at the intersection of social commentary and celebration. This is really important. We have a difficult history in this country and this city and we cannot do things without asking ourselves serious questions. This year, the carnival asks those questions. The freedom to play, the time to play, and the opportunity to play: these have been politically and socially denied to many South Africans for a long time, making play a political act. Carnival asserts the right to play.

The Carnival provides a vehicle for residents to reclaim the city.”

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.Award-winning artist and arts curator Khanyisile Mbongwa, who is assisting the Carnival team, said: “Cape Town Carnival occupies a unique space and role, communicating through the language of the carnivalesque, which is a combination of creativity, exaggeration, colour and spectacle at the intersection of social commentary and celebration. This is really important. We have a difficult history in this country and this city and we cannot do things without asking ourselves serious questions. This year, the carnival asks those questions. The freedom to play, the time to play, and the opportunity to play: these have been politically and socially denied to many South Africans for a long time, making play a political act. Carnival asserts the right to play.

The Carnival provides a vehicle for residents to reclaim the city.”

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.Award-winning artist and arts curator Khanyisile Mbongwa, who is assisting the Carnival team, said: “Cape Town Carnival occupies a unique space and role, communicating through the language of the carnivalesque, which is a combination of creativity, exaggeration, colour and spectacle at the intersection of social commentary and celebration. This is really important. We have a difficult history in this country and this city and we cannot do things without asking ourselves serious questions. This year, the carnival asks those questions. The freedom to play, the time to play, and the opportunity to play: these have been politically and socially denied to many South Africans for a long time, making play a political act. Carnival asserts the right to play.

The Carnival provides a vehicle for residents to reclaim the city.”

Dunisani Chabalala, deputy director of the National Department of Arts and Culture says they are proud to be associated with the event and hoped it would become a flagship initiative as part of the department.

Lead performer Nonkoliseko Samagu said carnival gave her the outlet to express herself through art and dance.

She said she was excited to be part of the initiative every year because it not only helps her, but also gives her an outlet to help others through an organisation she has started.

The sponsors of the 2019 Cape Town Carnival are Multichoice, the City of Cape Town, the National Department of Arts and Culture, the National Lotteries Commission, Kfm, the Western Cape Government, Tsogo Sun, Media24, the Western Cape Tourism, Trade and Investment Agency (Wesgro), Business and Arts South Africa (BASA), Peninsula Beverages, and Gearhouse.

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow.

“As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.

“We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another.

“Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.Award-winning artist and arts curator Khanyisile Mbongwa, who is assisting the Carnival team, said: “Cape Town Carnival occupies a unique space and role, communicating through the language of the carnivalesque, which is a combination of creativity, exaggeration, colour and spectacle at the intersection of social commentary and celebration. This is really important. We have a difficult history in this country and this city and we cannot do things without asking ourselves serious questions. This year, the carnival asks those questions. The freedom to play, the time to play, and the opportunity to play: these have been politically and socially denied to many South Africans for a long time, making play a political act. Carnival asserts the right to play.

The Carnival provides a vehicle for residents to reclaim the city.”

Dunisani Chabalala, deputy director of the National Department of Arts and Culture says they are proud to be associated with the event and hoped it would become a flagship initiative as part of the department.

Lead performer Nonkoliseko Samagu said carnival gave her the outlet to express herself through art and dance. She said she was excited to be part of the initiative every year because it not only helps her, but also gives her an outlet to help others through an organisation she has started.The sponsors of the 2019 Cape Town Carnival are Multichoice, the City of Cape Town, the National Department of Arts and Culture, the National Lotteries Commission, Kfm, the Western Cape Government, Tsogo Sun, Media24, the Western Cape Tourism, Trade and Investment Agency (Wesgro), Business and Arts South Africa (BASA), Peninsula Beverages, and Gearhouse.

The Cape Town Carnival will set the scene for glitz and glamour once again as the event returns, celebrating a decade this year.

The event will be held on Saturday 16 March, with the pre-parade starting from 18:00.

The official countdown event was held last Wednesday at Nasdak. This event marked 50 days to the carnival.

Each year, the carnival attracts thousands of spectators who come together to celebrate cultures, history and social cohesion through a display of colour and splendour. “This year’s theme is Vuka Ukhanye: Arise and Shine!, a call to action to shake off limiting beliefs and be all we can be,” said Cape Town Carnival CEO Jay Douwes.

Rachel Jafta, founder of the Carnival and chairperson of the Cape Town Carnival Trust, said: “The Cape Town Carnival was envisaged as a way of bringing people together and building social cohesion, while offering an extraordinary visual and creative feast and a skills development hub for a wide array of skills.”

Jafta continued that the event has since become a global event with people travelling from both other provinces in South Africa and the rest of the world to marvel in the spectacle that is the Cape Town Carnival. Another part of the carnival is the annual skills transfer project that sees job creation for residents from vulnerable communities in and around Cape Town.

Cape Town Mayor, Dan Plato commented that it was good to see government working together.

“It is a wonderful initiative and it creates opportunities for the communities on the Cape Flats, townships and the city as a whole. The carnival grows and grows and must continue to grow. As the City of Cape Town, we will do whatever we can to make sure it remains a big part of our events calendar. The carnival brings people from different cultures and diversities together, celebrating all that is Cape Town.We all have a role to play. That is what the theme represents. A call to action for individual and collective engagement to inspire each other and ourselves to not leave it up to someone else. To not expect the world to take care of itself, but to get involved. With this we are in a position to do so and at the same time, make it fun and beautiful,” said Carnival creative director Brad Baard.

Baard says the city’s vital social and cultural character is kept alive by creating and supporting social interaction between all Capetonians and through recognition of one another. “Cape Town’s spirit shouldn’t be underestimated – it’s part of the fabric of our society,” he said.

The event featured a panel discussion by role players and sponsors.Award-winning artist and arts curator Khanyisile Mbongwa, who is assisting the Carnival team, said: “Cape Town Carnival occupies a unique space and role, communicating through the language of the carnivalesque, which is a combination of creativity, exaggeration, colour and spectacle at the intersection of social commentary and celebration. This is really important. We have a difficult history in this country and this city and we cannot do things without asking ourselves serious questions. This year, the carnival asks those questions. The freedom to play, the time to play, and the opportunity to play: these have been politically and socially denied to many South Africans for a long time, making play a political act. Carnival asserts the right to play.

The Carnival provides a vehicle for residents to reclaim the city.”

Dunisani Chabalala, deputy director of the National Department of Arts and Culture says they are proud to be associated with the event and hoped it would become a flagship initiative as part of the department.

Lead performer Nonkoliseko Samagu said carnival gave her the outlet to express herself through art and dance. She said she was excited to be part of the initiative every year because it not only helps her, but also gives her an outlet to help others through an organisation she has started.

The sponsors of the 2019 Cape Town Carnival are Multichoice, the City of Cape Town, the National Department of Arts and Culture, the National Lotteries Commission, Kfm, the Western Cape Government, Tsogo Sun, Media24, the Western Cape Tourism, Trade and Investment Agency (Wesgro), Business and Arts South Africa (BASA), Peninsula Beverages, and Gearhouse.

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