Check your blood pressure and take action

2019-05-23 06:00
Go for a regular check-up to make sure your blood pressure is under control.

Go for a regular check-up to make sure your blood pressure is under control.

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Skipping the liquor and getting active will not just do your waistline good – it can save your life.

With only half the number of people who have high blood pressure being aware of it and only half of them taking action, they are at great risk for experiencing heart disease, a stroke and kidney disease, and even death.

According to the Southern African Hypertension Society, globally, about four out of 10 adults older than 25 have high blood pressure and just 50% of them know it. Individuals who have diabetes are at a greater risk of dying due to high blood pressure.

On World Hypertension Day, which was commemorated last Friday, the public was urged to find out what their blood pressure is and to take action according to guidelines by health care workers.

High blood pressure

When your blood pressure exceeds a certain threshold, it is called high blood pressure or hypertension. Unlike many other diseases, the condition has no symptoms and is known as the “silent killer”.

Blood pressure tests are painless and easy. If your blood pressure results indicate that you are becoming hypertensive, you need to follow the guidance of your health care worker. Some of the changes you may have to make include:

. Stop smoking;

. Become more active and start with brisk walking for at least 30 minutes on most days;

. Eat more fruit and vegetables;

. Use less salt (avoid adding salt to your food once it is plated).

. Eat lean meat or remove the fat from meat before cooking or eating.

. Choose water rather than cool drinks.

. Limit your alcohol intake.

If medication is prescribed, take it as indicated even if you do not feel sick. Continue to take your medication unless otherwise instructed by healthcare workers.

As these lifestyle changes are good for every family member, making changes as a family is a good way to support the person who has hypertension. With some evidence suggesting that high blood pressure may run in the family, it is advisable to have other family members also check their blood pressure.

Knowing if you have high blood pressure is key to avoiding sudden illness or death. Check your blood pressure at least once a year by visiting your nearest clinic. The test is free and knowing you have high blood pressure and acting thereon, can be lifesaving.

Skip the queue

To make the collection of medication easier and quicker for patients who are treated for chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes and HIV/Aids, clinics run alternative distribution sites on specific dates and times.

Patients can ask the staff at their local clinics about making use of this service, which is often offered at locations like community halls or libraries.

Skipping the liquor and getting active will not just do your waistline good – it can save your life.

With only half the number of people who have high blood pressure being aware of it and only half of them taking action, they are at great risk for experiencing heart disease, a stroke and kidney disease, and even death.

According to the Southern African Hypertension Society, globally, about four out of 10 adults older than 25 have high blood pressure and just 50% of them know it. Individuals who have diabetes are at a greater risk of dying due to high blood pressure.

On World Hypertension Day, which was commemorated last Friday, the public was urged to find out what their blood pressure is and to take action according to guidelines by health care workers.

High blood pressure

When your blood pressure exceeds a certain threshold, it is called high blood pressure or hypertension. Unlike many other diseases, the condition has no symptoms and is known as the “silent killer”.

Blood pressure tests are painless and easy. If your blood pressure results indicate that you are becoming hypertensive, you need to follow the guidance of your health care worker. Some of the changes you may have to make include:

. Stop smoking;

. Become more active and start with brisk walking for at least 30 minutes on most days;

. Eat more fruit and vegetables;

. Use less salt (avoid adding salt to your food once it is plated).

. Eat lean meat or remove the fat from meat before cooking or eating.

. Choose water rather than cool drinks.

. Limit your alcohol intake.

If medication is prescribed, take it as indicated even if you do not feel sick. Continue to take your medication unless otherwise instructed by healthcare workers.

As these lifestyle changes are good for every family member, making changes as a family is a good way to support the person who has hypertension. With some evidence suggesting that high blood pressure may run in the family, it is advisable to have other family members also check their blood pressure.

Knowing if you have high blood pressure is key to avoiding sudden illness or death. Check your blood pressure at least once a year by visiting your nearest clinic. The test is free and knowing you have high blood pressure and acting thereon, can be lifesaving.

Skip the queue

To make the collection of medication easier and quicker for patients who are treated for chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes and HIV/Aids, clinics run alternative distribution sites on specific dates and times. Patients can ask the staff at their local clinics about making use of this service, which is often offered at locations like community halls or libraries.

Skipping the liquor and getting active will not just do your waistline good – it can save your life.

With only half the number of people who have high blood pressure being aware of it and only half of them taking action, they are at great risk for experiencing heart disease, a stroke and kidney disease, and even death.

According to the Southern African Hypertension Society, globally, about four out of 10 adults older than 25 have high blood pressure and just 50% of them know it. Individuals who have diabetes are at a greater risk of dying due to high blood pressure.

On World Hypertension Day, which was commemorated last Friday, the public was urged to find out what their blood pressure is and to take action according to guidelines by health care workers.

High blood pressure

When your blood pressure exceeds a certain threshold, it is called high blood pressure or hypertension. Unlike many other diseases, the condition has no symptoms and is known as the “silent killer”.

Blood pressure tests are painless and easy. If your blood pressure results indicate that you are becoming hypertensive, you need to follow the guidance of your health care worker. Some of the changes you may have to make include:

. Stop smoking;

. Become more active and start with brisk walking for at least 30 minutes on most days;

. Eat more fruit and vegetables;

. Use less salt (avoid adding salt to your food once it is plated).

. Eat lean meat or remove the fat from meat before cooking or eating.

. Choose water rather than cool drinks.

. Limit your alcohol intake.

If medication is prescribed, take it as indicated even if you do not feel sick. Continue to take your medication unless otherwise instructed by healthcare workers.

As these lifestyle changes are good for every family member, making changes as a family is a good way to support the person who has hypertension. With some evidence suggesting that high blood pressure may run in the family, it is advisable to have other family members also check their blood pressure.

Knowing if you have high blood pressure is key to avoiding sudden illness or death. Check your blood pressure at least once a year by visiting your nearest clinic. The test is free and knowing you have high blood pressure and acting thereon, can be lifesaving.

Skip the queue

To make the collection of medication easier and quicker for patients who are treated for chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes and HIV/Aids, clinics run alternative distribution sites on specific dates and times.

Patients can ask the staff at their local clinics about making use of this service, which is often offered at locations like community halls or libraries.

Skipping the liquor and getting active will not just do your waistline good – it can save your life.

With only half the number of people who have high blood pressure being aware of it and only half of them taking action, they are at great risk for experiencing heart disease, a stroke and kidney disease, and even death.

According to the Southern African Hypertension Society, globally, about four out of 10 adults older than 25 have high blood pressure and just 50% of them know it. Individuals who have diabetes are at a greater risk of dying due to high blood pressure.

On World Hypertension Day, which was commemorated last Friday, the public was urged to find out what their blood pressure is and to take action according to guidelines by health care workers.

High blood pressure

When your blood pressure exceeds a certain threshold, it is called high blood pressure or hypertension. Unlike many other diseases, the condition has no symptoms and is known as the “silent killer”.

Blood pressure tests are painless and easy. If your blood pressure results indicate that you are becoming hypertensive, you need to follow the guidance of your health care worker. Some of the changes you may have to make include:

. Stop smoking;

. Become more active and start with brisk walking for at least 30 minutes on most days;

. Eat more fruit and vegetables;

. Use less salt (avoid adding salt to your food once it is plated).

. Eat lean meat or remove the fat from meat before cooking or eating.

. Choose water rather than cool drinks.

. Limit your alcohol intake.

If medication is prescribed, take it as indicated even if you do not feel sick. Continue to take your medication unless otherwise instructed by healthcare workers.

As these lifestyle changes are good for every family member, making changes as a family is a good way to support the person who has hypertension. With some evidence suggesting that high blood pressure may run in the family, it is advisable to have other family members also check their blood pressure.

Knowing if you have high blood pressure is key to avoiding sudden illness or death. Check your blood pressure at least once a year by visiting your nearest clinic. The test is free and knowing you have high blood pressure and acting thereon, can be lifesaving.

Skip the queue

To make the collection of medication easier and quicker for patients who are treated for chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes and HIV/Aids, clinics run alternative distribution sites on specific dates and times.

Patients can ask the staff at their local clinics about making use of this service, which is often offered at locations like community halls or libraries.

Skipping the liquor and getting active will not just do your waistline good – it can save your life.

With only half the number of people who have high blood pressure being aware of it and only half of them taking action, they are at great risk for experiencing heart disease, a stroke and kidney disease, and even death.

According to the Southern African Hypertension Society, globally, about four out of 10 adults older than 25 have high blood pressure and just 50% of them know it. Individuals who have diabetes are at a greater risk of dying due to high blood pressure.

On World Hypertension Day, which was commemorated last Friday, the public was urged to find out what their blood pressure is and to take action according to guidelines by health care workers.

High blood pressure

When your blood pressure exceeds a certain threshold, it is called high blood pressure or hypertension.

Unlike many other diseases, the condition has no symptoms and is known as the “silent killer”.

Blood pressure tests are painless and easy. If your blood pressure results indicate that you are becoming hypertensive, you need to follow the guidance of your health care worker. Some of the changes you may have to make include:

. Stop smoking;

. Become more active and start with brisk walking for at least 30 minutes on most days;

. Eat more fruit and vegetables;

. Use less salt (avoid adding salt to your food once it is plated).

. Eat lean meat or remove the fat from meat before cooking or eating.

. Choose water rather than cool drinks.

. Limit your alcohol intake.

If medication is prescribed, take it as indicated even if you do not feel sick. Continue to take your medication unless otherwise instructed by healthcare workers.

As these lifestyle changes are good for every family member, making changes as a family is a good way to support the person who has hypertension. With some evidence suggesting that high blood pressure may run in the family, it is advisable to have other family members also check their blood pressure.

Knowing if you have high blood pressure is key to avoiding sudden illness or death. Check your blood pressure at least once a year by visiting your nearest clinic. The test is free and knowing you have high blood pressure and acting thereon, can be lifesaving.

Skip the queue

To make the collection of medication easier and quicker for patients who are treated for chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes and HIV/Aids, clinics run alternative distribution sites on specific dates and times.

Patients can ask the staff at their local clinics about making use of this service, which is often offered at locations like community halls or libraries.

Skipping the liquor and getting active will not just do your waistline good – it can save your life.

With only half the number of people who have high blood pressure being aware of it and only half of them taking action, they are at great risk for experiencing heart disease, a stroke and kidney disease, and even death.

According to the Southern African Hypertension Society, globally, about four out of 10 adults older than 25 have high blood pressure and just 50% of them know it. Individuals who have diabetes are at a greater risk of dying due to high blood pressure.

On World Hypertension Day, which was commemorated last Friday, the public was urged to find out what their blood pressure is and to take action according to guidelines by health care workers.

High blood pressure

When your blood pressure exceeds a certain threshold, it is called high blood pressure or hypertension. Unlike many other diseases, the condition has no symptoms and is known as the “silent killer”.

Blood pressure tests are painless and easy. If your blood pressure results indicate that you are becoming hypertensive, you need to follow the guidance of your health care worker. Some of the changes you may have to make include:

. Stop smoking;

. Become more active and start with brisk walking for at least 30 minutes on most days;

. Eat more fruit and vegetables;

. Use less salt (avoid adding salt to your food once it is plated).

. Eat lean meat or remove the fat from meat before cooking or eating.

. Choose water rather than cool drinks.

. Limit your alcohol intake.

If medication is prescribed, take it as indicated even if you do not feel sick. Continue to take your medication unless otherwise instructed by healthcare workers.

As these lifestyle changes are good for every family member, making changes as a family is a good way to support the person who has hypertension. With some evidence suggesting that high blood pressure may run in the family, it is advisable to have other family members also check their blood pressure.

Knowing if you have high blood pressure is key to avoiding sudden illness or death. Check your blood pressure at least once a year by visiting your nearest clinic. The test is free and knowing you have high blood pressure and acting thereon, can be lifesaving.

Skip the queue

To make the collection of medication easier and quicker for patients who are treated for chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes and HIV/Aids, clinics run alternative distribution sites on specific dates and times.

Patients can ask the staff at their local clinics about making use of this service, which is often offered at locations like community halls or libraries.

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