City avails funds for a safer, secure Cape

2019-02-07 06:00

Mayor Dan Plato has announced that the City of Cape Town is pulling out all the stops to beef up safety and security initiatives in communities across the city.

“An additional R165m has been made available to boost efforts against crime within the city.”

He made the announcement during a Council sitting on Thursday last week, which he said became available through budget adjustments.

Plato added that the money will increase visible policing in vulnerable communities.

Additional funds will also be made available for much-needed capital projects like fire stations.

“This is just the start of our efforts to increase safety levels in our communities,” he says. “I want to see even more budget allocated to our enforcement agencies and rescue services in the next financial year.”

Plato says the public will have the opportunity to comment on the budget once it has been published in the City’s annual budget next month.

He said the R165.2m allocation comprises capital expenditure of R42.2m and operating expenditure of R123m.

Some of the capital projects that will benefit from the allocation include:

.R7.5m for the upgrade of the Ndabeni vehicle pound

.R2.6m in additional funding for the Somerset West fire sation

.R15m to procure between 36 and 40 replacement vehicles, depending on the type of vehicles required

.R5.5m for additional two-way radios for Law Enforcement staff

The planned operating expenditure includes:

.R30m to recruit additional Law Enforcement officers

.R10m for uniforms, personal protective gear and equipment for staff

.R50m for additional overtime allocation to ensure a more sustained, 24/7 service and R20m to cover related fuel costs

.R8m for repairs and maintenance of vehicles in the various departments

.44 new CCTV cameras across the city in vulnerable areas, and a new camera room in Ocean View

.Expanding the K9 Unit, thanks to funding from the Western Cape Government

“The staff in our Safety and Security Directorate provide an invaluable contribution to safety in our city, in spite of very trying circumstances.

In the previous financial year, they contended with an unprecedented increase in land invasions and protest action; worked tirelessly to patrol the streets amid ongoing gang violence; worked non-stop to plan for the potential impact of one of the worst droughts on record as well as an increase in attacks on staff,” adds Plato.

According to Plato, during the 2017/18 financial year, the number of arrests made by the City’s enforcement agencies increased by 17% year-on-year, as outlined in the release of the annual statistics.

The number of firearm confiscations increased exponentially, as did the number of screenings for driving under the influence (DUI). There were increases in the amount of liquor confiscated and notices issued for traffic and bylaw offences as well as overloaded vehicles, to mention just a few categories.

Mayco member for safety and security JP Smith said the sheer volume of work that gets done is staggering and he doesn’t think many people fully appreciate it.

Our pilot project in Delft with the neighbourhood safety team, which added some 100 plus officers there every day, has shown good results and we would be in a position to expand this to our other hotspots with this extra budget,” he said.

The Western Cape Government has contributed R3m to the Metro Police K9 Unit.

The City of Cape Town is pulling out all the stops to beef up safety and security initiatives in communities across the city. An additional R165m has been made available to boost efforts against crime within the city. The funding was announced by mayor Dan Plato during the Council sitting on Thursday last week. The money became available through budget adjustments, said Plato.

He added that the money will increase visible policing in vulnerable communities. Additional funds will also be made available for much-needed capital projects like fire stations.

“This is just the start of our efforts to increase safety levels in our communities,” he says. “I want to see even more budget allocated to our enforcement agencies and rescue services in the next financial year.”

Plato says the public will have the opportunity to comment on the budget once it has been published in the City’s annual budget next month. He says the R165.2m allocation comprises capital expenditure of R42.2m and operating expenditure of R123m.

Some of the capital projects that will benefit from the allocation include:

.R7.5m for the upgrade of the Ndabeni vehicle pound

.R2.6m in additional funding for the Somerset West fire sation

.R15m to procure between 36 and 40 replacement vehicles, depending on the type of vehicles required

.R5.5m for additional two-way radios for Law Enforcement staff

The planned operating expenditure includes:

.R30m to recruit additional Law Enforcement officers

.R10m for uniforms, personal protective gear and equipment for staff

.R50m for additional overtime allocation to ensure a more sustained, 24/7 service and R20m to cover related fuel costs

.R8m for repairs and maintenance of vehicles in the various departments

.44 new CCTV cameras across the city in vulnerable areas, and a new camera room in Ocean View

.Expanding the K9 Unit, thanks to funding from the Western Cape Government

“The staff in our Safety and Security Directorate provide an invaluable contribution to safety in our city, in spite of very trying circumstances. In the previous financial year, they contended with an unprecedented increase in land invasions and protest action; worked tirelessly to patrol the streets amid ongoing gang violence; worked non-stop to plan for the potential impact of one of the worst droughts on record as well as an increase in attacks on staff,” adds Plato.

According to Plato during the 2017/18 financial year, the number of arrests made by the City’s enforcement agencies increased by 17% year-on-year, as outlined in the release of the annual statistics.

The number of firearm confiscations increased exponentially, as did the number of screenings for driving under the influence (DUI). There were increases in the amount of liquor confiscated and notices issued for traffic and bylaw offences as well as overloaded vehicles, to mention just a few categories.

Mayco member for safety and security JP Smith said the sheer volume of work that gets done is staggering and he doesn’t think many people fully appreciate it.

“It is also worth noting that the City’s Safety and Security Directorate is likely the most transparent public safety agency in terms of accounting to the public it serves. I note that a few other metropolitan municipalities have started providing monthly updates on their enforcement statistics – this has been the norm in Cape Town for many years. Our pilot project in Delft with the neighbourhood safety team, which added some 100 plus officers there every day, has shown good results and we would be in a position to expand this to our other hotspots with this extra budget,” he says.

The Western Cape Government has contributed R3m to bolster the Metro Police K9 Unit.

Plato says: “The Western Cape Government is determined to do everything it can to make this a safer Western Cape. That is why we have made additional funds available to support the City of Cape Town’s professionally staffed Law Enforcement team. The contribution towards the K9 Unit is intended to help address drug-related crime. Earlier this year, we transferred almost R4m to the City to support school resource officers. These funds go toward keeping our learners, and their learning spaces, safe from criminals.”

Provincial minister of community safety, Alan Winde, says that despite seven of the top 10 murder precincts being located in Cape Town, including the murder capital of SA, Nyanga, the National Government has refused to give the City enough police.

“In fact, they have gradually withdrawn 4500 cops from our streets over the last four years. I commend the City’s Law Enforcement agencies for the excellent work they do under challenging circumstances to fight crime in our city. They have increasingly stepped up to fill the gap in many areas where SAPS is failing, including gang violence, rail enforcement, liquor enforcement, metal theft and marine enforcement,’’ says Winde.

“We hear the pleas of our communities and we are responding. The people of Cape Town must feel safe, and while police remains the primary law enforcement authority, I want to make sure that, as the City of Cape Town, we play our part in doing everything we can to keep our communities safe,” says Plato.V Full details on some key statistics by department are available here: http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre%20Assets/ENFORCEMENT%20STATS.pdf.

The City of Cape Town is pulling out all the stops to beef up safety and security initiatives in communities across the city. An additional R165m has been made available to boost efforts against crime within the city. The funding was announced by mayor Dan Plato during the Council sitting on Thursday last week. The money became available through budget adjustments, said Plato.

He added that the money will increase visible policing in vulnerable communities. Additional funds will also be made available for much-needed capital projects like fire stations.

“This is just the start of our efforts to increase safety levels in our communities,” he says. “I want to see even more budget allocated to our enforcement agencies and rescue services in the next financial year.”

Plato says the public will have the opportunity to comment on the budget once it has been published in the City’s annual budget next month. He says the R165.2m allocation comprises capital expenditure of R42.2m and operating expenditure of R123m.

Some of the capital projects that will benefit from the allocation include:

.R7.5m for the upgrade of the Ndabeni vehicle pound

.R2.6m in additional funding for the Somerset West fire sation

.R15m to procure between 36 and 40 replacement vehicles, depending on the type of vehicles required

.R5.5m for additional two-way radios for Law Enforcement staff

The planned operating expenditure includes:

.R30m to recruit additional Law Enforcement officers

.R10m for uniforms, personal protective gear and equipment for staff

.R50m for additional overtime allocation to ensure a more sustained, 24/7 service and R20m to cover related fuel costs

.R8m for repairs and maintenance of vehicles in the various departments

.44 new CCTV cameras across the city in vulnerable areas, and a new camera room in Ocean View

.Expanding the K9 Unit, thanks to funding from the Western Cape Government

“The staff in our Safety and Security Directorate provide an invaluable contribution to safety in our city, in spite of very trying circumstances. In the previous financial year, they contended with an unprecedented increase in land invasions and protest action; worked tirelessly to patrol the streets amid ongoing gang violence; worked non-stop to plan for the potential impact of one of the worst droughts on record as well as an increase in attacks on staff,” adds Plato.

According to Plato during the 2017/18 financial year, the number of arrests made by the City’s enforcement agencies increased by 17% year-on-year, as outlined in the release of the annual statistics.

The number of firearm confiscations increased exponentially, as did the number of screenings for driving under the influence (DUI). There were increases in the amount of liquor confiscated and notices issued for traffic and bylaw offences as well as overloaded vehicles, to mention just a few categories.

Mayco member for safety and security JP Smith said the sheer volume of work that gets done is staggering and he doesn’t think many people fully appreciate it.

“It is also worth noting that the City’s Safety and Security Directorate is likely the most transparent public safety agency in terms of accounting to the public it serves. I note that a few other metropolitan municipalities have started providing monthly updates on their enforcement statistics – this has been the norm in Cape Town for many years. Our pilot project in Delft with the neighbourhood safety team, which added some 100 plus officers there every day, has shown good results and we would be in a position to expand this to our other hotspots with this extra budget,” he says.

The Western Cape Government has contributed R3m to bolster the Metro Police K9 Unit.

Plato says: “The Western Cape Government is determined to do everything it can to make this a safer Western Cape. That is why we have made additional funds available to support the City of Cape Town’s professionally staffed Law Enforcement team. The contribution towards the K9 Unit is intended to help address drug-related crime. Earlier this year, we transferred almost R4m to the City to support school resource officers. These funds go toward keeping our learners, and their learning spaces, safe from criminals.”

Provincial minister of community safety, Alan Winde, says that despite seven of the top 10 murder precincts being located in Cape Town, including the murder capital of SA, Nyanga, the National Government has refused to give the City enough police.

“In fact, they have gradually withdrawn 4500 cops from our streets over the last four years. I commend the City’s Law Enforcement agencies for the excellent work they do under challenging circumstances to fight crime in our city. They have increasingly stepped up to fill the gap in many areas where SAPS is failing, including gang violence, rail enforcement, liquor enforcement, metal theft and marine enforcement,’’ says Winde.

“We hear the pleas of our communities and we are responding. The people of Cape Town must feel safe, and while police remains the primary law enforcement authority, I want to make sure that, as the City of Cape Town, we play our part in doing everything we can to keep our communities safe,” says Plato.

The City of Cape Town is pulling out all the stops to beef up safety and security initiatives in communities across the city. An additional R165m has been made available to boost efforts against crime within the city. The funding was announced by mayor Dan Plato during the Council sitting on Thursday last week. The money became available through budget adjustments, said Plato.

He added that the money will increase visible policing in vulnerable communities. Additional funds will also be made available for much-needed capital projects like fire stations.

“This is just the start of our efforts to increase safety levels in our communities,” he says. “I want to see even more budget allocated to our enforcement agencies and rescue services in the next financial year.”

Plato says the public will have the opportunity to comment on the budget once it has been published in the City’s annual budget next month. He says the R165.2m allocation comprises capital expenditure of R42.2m and operating expenditure of R123m.

Some of the capital projects that will benefit from the allocation include:

.R7.5m for the upgrade of the Ndabeni vehicle pound

.R2.6m in additional funding for the Somerset West fire sation

.R15m to procure between 36 and 40 replacement vehicles, depending on the type of vehicles required

.R5.5m for additional two-way radios for Law Enforcement staff

The planned operating expenditure includes:

.R30m to recruit additional Law Enforcement officers

.R10m for uniforms, personal protective gear and equipment for staff

.R50m for additional overtime allocation to ensure a more sustained, 24/7 service and R20m to cover related fuel costs

.R8m for repairs and maintenance of vehicles in the various departments

.44 new CCTV cameras across the city in vulnerable areas, and a new camera room in Ocean View

.Expanding the K9 Unit, thanks to funding from the Western Cape Government

“The staff in our Safety and Security Directorate provide an invaluable contribution to safety in our city, in spite of very trying circumstances. In the previous financial year, they contended with an unprecedented increase in land invasions and protest action; worked tirelessly to patrol the streets amid ongoing gang violence; worked non-stop to plan for the potential impact of one of the worst droughts on record as well as an increase in attacks on staff,” adds Plato.

According to Plato during the 2017/18 financial year, the number of arrests made by the City’s enforcement agencies increased by 17% year-on-year, as outlined in the release of the annual statistics.

The number of firearm confiscations increased exponentially, as did the number of screenings for driving under the influence (DUI). There were increases in the amount of liquor confiscated and notices issued for traffic and bylaw offences as well as overloaded vehicles, to mention just a few categories.

Mayco member for safety and security JP Smith said the sheer volume of work that gets done is staggering and he doesn’t think many people fully appreciate it. “It is also worth noting that the City’s Safety and Security Directorate is likely the most transparent public safety agency in terms of accounting to the public it serves. I note that a few other metropolitan municipalities have started providing monthly updates on their enforcement statistics – this has been the norm in Cape Town for many years. Our pilot project in Delft with the neighbourhood safety team, which added some 100 plus officers there every day, has shown good results and we would be in a position to expand this to our other hotspots with this extra budget,” he says.

The Western Cape Government has contributed R3m to bolster the Metro Police K9 Unit. Plato says: “The contribution towards the K9 Unit is intended to help address drug-related crime. Earlier this year, we transferred almost R4m to the City to support school resource officers. These funds go toward keeping our learners, and their learning spaces, safe from criminals.”

Provincial minister of community safety, Alan Winde, said: “I commend the City’s Law Enforcement agencies for the excellent work they do under challenging circumstances to fight crime in our city. They have increasingly stepped up to fill the gap in many areas where SAPS is failing, including gang violence, rail enforcement, liquor enforcement, metal theft and marine enforcement,’’ says Winde.

The City of Cape Town is pulling out all the stops to beef up safety and security initiatives in communities across the city. An additional R165m has been made available to boost efforts against crime within the city. The funding was announced by mayor Dan Plato during the Council sitting on Thursday last week. The money became available through budget adjustments, said Plato.

He added that the money will increase visible policing in vulnerable communities. Additional funds will also be made available for much-needed capital projects like fire stations.

“This is just the start of our efforts to increase safety levels in our communities,” he says. “I want to see even more budget allocated to our enforcement agencies and rescue services in the next financial year.”

Plato says the public will have the opportunity to comment on the budget once it has been published in the City’s annual budget next month. He says the R165.2m allocation comprises capital expenditure of R42.2m and operating expenditure of R123m.

Some of the capital projects that will benefit from the allocation include:

.R7.5m for the upgrade of the Ndabeni vehicle pound

.R2.6m in additional funding for the Somerset West fire sation

.R15m to procure between 36 and 40 replacement vehicles, depending on the type of vehicles required

.R5.5m for additional two-way radios for Law Enforcement staff

The planned operating expenditure includes:

.R30m to recruit additional Law Enforcement officers

.R10m for uniforms, personal protective gear and equipment for staff

.R50m for additional overtime allocation to ensure a more sustained, 24/7 service and R20m to cover related fuel costs

.R8m for repairs and maintenance of vehicles in the various departments

.44 new CCTV cameras across the city in vulnerable areas, and a new camera room in Ocean View

.Expanding the K9 Unit, thanks to funding from the Western Cape Government

“The staff in our Safety and Security Directorate provide an invaluable contribution to safety in our city, in spite of very trying circumstances. In the previous financial year, they contended with an unprecedented increase in land invasions and protest action; worked tirelessly to patrol the streets amid ongoing gang violence; worked non-stop to plan for the potential impact of one of the worst droughts on record as well as an increase in attacks on staff,” adds Plato.

According to Plato during the 2017/18 financial year, the number of arrests made by the City’s enforcement agencies increased by 17% year-on-year, as outlined in the release of the annual statistics.

The number of firearm confiscations increased exponentially, as did the number of screenings for driving under the influence (DUI). There were increases in the amount of liquor confiscated and notices issued for traffic and bylaw offences as well as overloaded vehicles, to mention just a few categories.

Mayco member for safety and security JP Smith said the sheer volume of work that gets done is staggering and he doesn’t think many people fully appreciate it.

“It is also worth noting that the City’s Safety and Security Directorate is likely the most transparent public safety agency in terms of accounting to the public it serves. I note that a few other metropolitan municipalities have started providing monthly updates on their enforcement statistics – this has been the norm in Cape Town for many years. Our pilot project in Delft with the neighbourhood safety team, which added some 100 plus officers there every day, has shown good results and we would be in a position to expand this to our other hotspots with this extra budget,” he says.

The Western Cape Government has contributed R3m to bolster the Metro Police K9 Unit.

Plato says: “The Western Cape Government is determined to do everything it can to make this a safer Western Cape. That is why we have made additional funds available to support the City of Cape Town’s professionally staffed Law Enforcement team. The contribution towards the K9 Unit is intended to help address drug-related crime. Earlier this year, we transferred almost R4m to the City to support school resource officers. These funds go toward keeping our learners, and their learning spaces, safe from criminals.”

Provincial minister of community safety, Alan Winde, says that despite seven of the top 10 murder precincts being located in Cape Town, including the murder capital of SA, Nyanga, the National Government has refused to give the City enough police.

“In fact, they have gradually withdrawn 4500 cops from our streets over the last four years. I commend the City’s Law Enforcement agencies for the excellent work they do under challenging circumstances to fight crime in our city. They have increasingly stepped up to fill the gap in many areas where SAPS is failing, including gang violence, rail enforcement, liquor enforcement, metal theft and marine enforcement,’’ says Winde.

“We hear the pleas of our communities and we are responding. The people of Cape Town must feel safe, and while police remains the primary law enforcement authority, I want to make sure that, as the City of Cape Town, we play our part in doing everything we can to keep our communities safe,” says Plato.V Full details on some key statistics by department are available here: http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre%20Assets/ENFORCEMENT%20STATS.pdf.

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