Dealing with head injuries

2019-04-04 06:01

World Head Injury Awareness Day, observed annually on 20 March, looks at the number of people who suffer from a mild bump on their head to severe brain injury.

The Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital deals with a variety of these head injuries.

While some head injuries are quite obvious, the Hospital and ChildSafe would also like to raise awareness around the mild head injury.

Mild head injury, also known as concussion, means that the brain has had a mild injury and will need time to recover. It is common to have mild headaches, dizziness, nausea or slight sleepiness.

A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by sudden strong movement of the brain against the skull. This is caused by a collision with another person or object. A child does not need to lose consciousness to have concussion.

If the child has just had a head injury that has been assessed as not requiring hospital treatment it is important that you observe your child at home for the next 24 hours in case their condition gets worse, as occasionally slow bleeding or other problems can occur later.

If the child receives a bump or blow to the head or body and that causes a jarring of the head or neck, the child should stop playing immediately. It is important to monitor them for signs and symptoms of concussion.

Take the child to the nearest hospital emergency centre if at any time they develop HEAD BUMPS*:

H - worsening Headache, seizures, unconscious

E - worsening Eye problems (blurred, double vision)

A - Abnormal behaviour change

D - Dizziness, persistent vomiting

B - Balance issues with weakness or numbness in legs or arms

U - Unsteady on feet, slurred speech

M - Memory impaired, confused, disoriented

P - Poor concentration, drowsy, sleepy

S - Something’s not right (concerned about child)

World Head Injury Awareness Day, observed annually on 20 March, looks at the number of people who suffer from a mild bump on their head to severe brain injury.

The Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital deals with a variety of these head injuries. While some head injuries are quite obvious, the Hospital and ChildSafe would also like to raise awareness around the mild head injury.

Mild head injury, also known as concussion, means that the brain has had a mild injury and will need time to recover. It is common to have mild headaches, dizziness, nausea or slight sleepiness.A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by sudden strong movement of the brain against the skull. This is caused by a collision with another person or object. A child does not need to lose consciousness to have concussion. Most concussion injuries do not involve any loss of consciousness. If the child has just had a head injury that has been assessed as not requiring hospital treatment it is important that you observe your child at home for the next 24 hours in case their condition gets worse, as occasionally slow bleeding or other problems can occur later.

If the child receives a bump or blow to the head or body and that causes a jarring of the head or neck, the child should stop playing immediately. It is important to monitor them for signs and symptoms of concussion.

Take the child to the nearest hospital emergency centre if at any time they develop HEAD BUMPS*:

H - worsening Headache, seizures, unconscious

E - worsening Eye problems (blurred, double vision)

A - Abnormal behaviour change

D - Dizziness, persistent vomiting

B - Balance issues with weakness or numbness in legs or arms

U - Unsteady on feet, slurred speech

M - Memory impaired, confused, disoriented

P - Poor concentration, drowsy, sleepy

S - Something’s not right (concerned about child)

World Head Injury Awareness Day, observed annually on 20 March, looks at the number of people who suffer from a mild bump on their head to severe brain injury.

The Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital deals with a variety of these head injuries.

While some head injuries are quite obvious, the Hospital and ChildSafe would also like to raise awareness around the mild head injury. Mild head injury, also known as concussion, means that the brain has had a mild injury and will need time to recover.

It is common to have mild headaches, dizziness, nausea or slight sleepiness. A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by sudden strong movement of the brain against the skull. This is caused by a collision with another person or object. A child does not need to lose consciousness to have concussion. Most concussion injuries do not involve any loss of consciousness. If the child has just had a head injury that has been assessed as not requiring hospital treatment it is important that you observe your child at home for the next 24 hours in case their condition gets worse, as occasionally slow bleeding or other problems can occur later. If the child receives a bump or blow to the head or body and that causes a jarring of the head or neck, the child should stop playing immediately. It is important to monitor them for signs and symptoms of concussion.

World Head Injury Awareness Day, observed annually on 20 March, looks at the number of people who suffer from a mild bump on their head to severe brain injury.

The Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital deals with a variety of these head injuries.

While some head injuries are quite obvious, the Hospital and ChildSafe would also like to raise awareness around the mild head injury.

Mild head injury, also known as concussion, means that the brain has had a mild injury and will need time to recover.

It is common to have mild headaches, dizziness, nausea or slight sleepiness.

A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by sudden strong movement of the brain against the skull. This is caused by a collision with another person or object. A child does not need to lose consciousness to have concussion.

Most concussion injuries do not involve any loss of consciousness.

If the child has just had a head injury that has been assessed as not requiring hospital treatment it is important that you observe your child at home for the next 24 hours in case their condition gets worse, as occasionally slow bleeding or other problems can occur later.

If the child receives a bump or blow to the head or body and that causes a jarring of the head or neck, the child should stop playing immediately.

It is important to monitor them for signs and symptoms of concussion.

World Head Injury Awareness Day, observed annually on 20 March, looks at the number of people who suffer from a mild bump on their head to severe brain injury.

The Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital deals with a variety of these head injuries. While some head injuries are quite obvious, the Hospital and ChildSafe would also like to raise awareness around the mild head injury.

Mild head injury, also known as concussion, means that the brain has had a mild injury and will need time to recover. It is common to have mild headaches, dizziness, nausea or slight sleepiness.

A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by sudden strong movement of the brain against the skull.

This is caused by a collision with another person or object. A child does not need to lose consciousness to have concussion. Most concussion injuries do not involve any loss of consciousness.

If the child has just had a head injury that has been assessed as not requiring hospital treatment it is important that you observe your child at home for the next 24 hours in case their condition gets worse, as occasionally slow bleeding or other problems can occur later.

If the child receives a bump or blow to the head or body and that causes a jarring of the head or neck, the child should stop playing immediately. It is important to monitor them for signs and symptoms of concussion.

Take the child to the nearest hospital emergency centre if at any time they develop HEAD BUMPS*:

H - worsening Headache, seizures, unconscious

E - worsening Eye problems (blurred, double vision)

A - Abnormal behaviour change

D - Dizziness, persistent vomiting

B - Balance issues with weakness or numbness in legs or arms

U - Unsteady on feet, slurred speech

M - Memory impaired, confused, disoriented

P - Poor concentration, drowsy, sleepy

S - Something’s not right (concerned about child)

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