Fetal alcohol syndrome under spotlight

2019-05-30 06:01

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The child protection week initiative which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected.

While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy.

This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy.

To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy. They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year. The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected.

While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception.

The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy.

This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy.

To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

National Child Protection Week is observed in South Africa annually to raise awareness of the rights of children.

The campaign which began in 1997 aims to mobilise all sectors of society to ensure children are cared for and protected. While the initiative is lead by the Minister of Social Development, it is every citizen’s duty to play a role in protecting children and creating a safe and secure environment for them.

This year, the week runs from today (28 May) to Tuesday 4 June.

Home of Hope, is a registered Child Protection Organisation that strives to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming alcohol during pregnancy.

They also aim to give pregnant women a chance to make an informed decision about alcohol during pregnancy and also to educate the rest of society in supporting the fight against Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

During National Child Protection Week it will be highlighted that protecting children doesn’t just begin at birth but at conception. The choices made during the nine months of pregnancy can change a child’s life for the better or the worse.

A major concern is FASD which is permanent brain damage caused to a foetus by being exposed to alcohol during pregnancy. This brain damage can manifest itself in aggressive behaviour, learning difficulties, hyperactivity, bad concentration and bad memory.

FASD is South Africa’s largest birth defect with around 60 000 to 72 000 children born with the disability each year.

The future for these children if they do not receive help or support is often one of crime, drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, unemployment and prison.

People sometimes believe that FASD only affects children of alcoholics but there is no known safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy. To the foetus, all types of alcohol are toxic. The damage is 100% permanent but fortunately also 100% preventable.

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