Free vaccines available

2019-05-02 06:01
The Western Cape Health Department is hosting a mass vaccination drive.

The Western Cape Health Department is hosting a mass vaccination drive.

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The Western Cape Department of Health calls on parents and guardians to take care of their children’s health by taking them for free immunisations at clinics and schools.

This is an easy way to support your child’s development, to prevent diseases and to limit the spread of disease within your family and your community. It will also give your child and community a better future.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that annually the lives of at least three million children are saved because of immunisation.

Vaccines are given to children by oral drops or an injection in the arm or leg. When a vaccine is administered, the body’s immune system is stimulated to create antibodies to protect the child against a specific disease or virus. By maintaining high rates of immunisation in our communities, we can prevent deadly diseases from returning to and spreading in those communities.

WHO emphasises that vaccines are completely safe and thoroughly tested before being approved for use. Contrary to a fraudulent paper that was published in 1998, there are no links or evidence that any vaccines can cause autism. In fact, when children are not vaccinated, they can suffer serious injury, such as paralysis, blindness or even death, when contracting polio, measles or whooping cough. The only side effects a child might experience after an immunisation, are a sore arm and sometimes a mild fever.

Immunisation prevents deadly diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria and whooping cough. It protects your child and ultimately your community from these diseases. The Road to Health booklet helps you to record immunisations received. If you lose the booklet, you can ask your healthcare worker or clinic for a duplicate. Use the immunisation schedule in the Road to Health Booklet to ensure your child receives their vaccinations at the right time. If your child missed a scheduled immunisation, talk to a health care worker at a clinic.

In the time leading up to immunisation campaigns at schools, parents or guardians will be asked for permission for children to receive immunisation. By giving consent, you position your child to learn and grow without the hindrance of falling ill with the most common and potentially deadly diseases that affect children.

The department also calls on the public to support the survey on the effective coverage of its immunisation campaign. Between February and May, trained fieldworkers are visiting randomly selected households to collect information that will be used to adapt the current immunisation strategy to the benefit of all.

World Immunisation Week started on Wednesday 24 April and ends today (Tuesday 30).

V Anyone with questions about the survey, can call 084 406 3362 or 079 511 6727.

The Western Cape Department of Health calls on parents and guardians to take care of their children’s health by taking them for free immunisations at clinics and schools.

This is an easy way to support your child’s development, to prevent diseases and to limit the spread of disease within your family and your community. It will also give your child and community a better future.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that annually the lives of at least three million children are saved because of immunisation. Vaccines are given to children by oral drops or an injection in the arm or leg. When a vaccine is administered, the body’s immune system is stimulated to create antibodies to protect the child against a specific disease or virus. By maintaining high rates of immunisation in our communities, we can prevent deadly diseases from returning to and spreading in those communities. WHO emphasises that vaccines are completely safe and thoroughly tested before being approved for use. Contrary to a fraudulent paper that was published in 1998, there are no links or evidence that any vaccines can cause autism. In fact, when children are not vaccinated, they can suffer serious injury, such as paralysis, blindness or even death, when contracting polio, measles or whooping cough. The only side effects a child might experience after an immunisation, are a sore arm and sometimes a mild fever.

Immunisation prevents deadly diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria and whooping cough. It protects your child and ultimately your community from these diseases. The Road to Health booklet helps you to record immunisations received. If you lose the booklet, you can ask your healthcare worker or clinic for a duplicate. Use the immunisation schedule in the Road to Health Booklet to ensure your child receives their vaccinations at the right time. If your child missed a scheduled immunisation, talk to a health care worker at a clinic.

In the time leading up to immunisation campaigns at schools, parents or guardians will be asked for permission for children to receive immunisation. By giving consent, you position your child to learn and grow without the hindrance of falling ill with the most common and potentially deadly diseases that affect children.

The department also calls on the public to support the survey on the effective coverage of its immunisation campaign. Between February and May, trained fieldworkers are visiting randomly selected households to collect information that will be used to adapt the current immunisation strategy to the benefit of all.

World Immunisation Week started on Wednesday 24 April and ends today (Tuesday 30).

V Anyone with questions about the survey, can call 084 406 3362 or 079 511 6727.

The Western Cape Department of Health calls on parents and guardians to take care of their children’s health by taking them for free immunisations at clinics and schools.

This is an easy way to support your child’s development, to prevent diseases and to limit the spread of disease within your family and your community.

It will also give your child and community a better future.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that annually the lives of at least three million children are saved because of immunisation.

Vaccines are given to children by oral drops or an injection in the arm or leg. When a vaccine is administered, the body’s immune system is stimulated to create antibodies to protect the child against a specific disease or virus. By maintaining high rates of immunisation in our communities, we can prevent deadly diseases from returning to and spreading in those communities.

WHO emphasises that vaccines are completely safe and thoroughly tested before being approved for use. Contrary to a fraudulent paper that was published in 1998, there are no links or evidence that any vaccines can cause autism. In fact, when children are not vaccinated, they can suffer serious injury, such as paralysis, blindness or even death, when contracting polio, measles or whooping cough. The only side effects a child might experience after an immunisation, are a sore arm and sometimes a mild fever.

Immunisation prevents deadly diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria and whooping cough. It protects your child and ultimately your community from these diseases.

The Road to Health booklet helps you to record immunisations received. If you lose the booklet, you can ask your healthcare worker or clinic for a duplicate. Use the immunisation schedule in the Road to Health Booklet to ensure your child receives their vaccinations at the right time. If your child missed a scheduled immunisation, talk to a health care worker at a clinic.

In the time leading up to immunisation campaigns at schools, parents or guardians will be asked for permission for children to receive immunisation. By giving consent, you position your child to learn and grow without the hindrance of falling ill with the most common and potentially deadly diseases that affect children.

The department also calls on the public to support the survey on the effective coverage of its immunisation campaign. Between February and May, trained fieldworkers are visiting randomly selected households to collect information that will be used to adapt the current immunisation strategy to the benefit of all.

World Immunisation Week started on Wednesday 24 April and ends today (Tuesday 30).

V Anyone with questions about the survey, can call 084 406 3362 or 079 511 6727.

The Western Cape Department of Health calls on parents and guardians to take care of their children’s health by taking them for free immunisations at clinics and schools.

This is an easy way to support your child’s development, to prevent diseases and to limit the spread of disease within your family and your community. It will also give your child and community a better future.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that annually the lives of at least three million children are saved because of immunisation.

Vaccines are given to children by oral drops or an injection in the arm or leg. When a vaccine is administered, the body’s immune system is stimulated to create antibodies to protect the child against a specific disease or virus. By maintaining high rates of immunisation in our communities, we can prevent deadly diseases from returning to and spreading in those communities.

WHO emphasises that vaccines are completely safe and thoroughly tested before being approved for use. Contrary to a fraudulent paper that was published in 1998, there are no links or evidence that any vaccines can cause autism. In fact, when children are not vaccinated, they can suffer serious injury, such as paralysis, blindness or even death, when contracting polio, measles or whooping cough. The only side effects a child might experience after an immunisation, are a sore arm and sometimes a mild fever.Immunisation prevents deadly diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria and whooping cough.

It protects your child and ultimately your community from these diseases.

The Road to Health booklet helps you to record immunisations received. If you lose the booklet, you can ask your healthcare worker or clinic for a duplicate. Use the immunisation schedule in the Road to Health Booklet to ensure your child receives their vaccinations at the right time. If your child missed a scheduled immunisation, talk to a health care worker at a clinic.

In the time leading up to immunisation campaigns at schools, parents or guardians will be asked for permission for children to receive immunisation. By giving consent, you position your child to learn and grow without the hindrance of falling ill with the most common and potentially deadly diseases that affect children.

The department also calls on the public to support the survey on the effective coverage of its immunisation campaign. Between February and May, trained fieldworkers are visiting randomly selected households to collect information that will be used to adapt the current immunisation strategy to the benefit of all.

World Immunisation Week started on Wednesday 24 April and ends today (Tuesday 30).

V Anyone with questions about the survey, can call 084 406 3362 or 079 511 6727.

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