Help fund bulletproof yoga rooms

2019-11-21 06:00
Children in underprivileged communities will be given the opportunity to relax and regroup through yoga, following the building of eight new yoga classrooms in Lavender Hill and Khayelitsha.

Children in underprivileged communities will be given the opportunity to relax and regroup through yoga, following the building of eight new yoga classrooms in Lavender Hill and Khayelitsha.

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The Earthchild Project’s yoga sessions have proven to relieve the stress and anger in children of two disadvantaged Cape Town communities, and now the organisation is hoping to create permanent calming spaces to host the classes.

The project works with 3 500 children and 300 teachers in eight schools in Lavender Hill and Khayelitsha.

It aims to instil mindfulness in its beneficiaries, through yoga, and to teach them practical gardening know-how in each of the schools’ organic gardens, which double as calming outdoor gardens.

Currently, yoga sessions are held in spare classrooms, school halls or outside, but Carly Appelby, communications and marketing manager for the project, says this is not ideal.

“Kids have to practice outside and being outside is not ideal a lot of the time.

“The Earthchild Project has identified the need for these children to have a space that is quiet and safe.”

Subsequently, it has begun to raise money to build dedicated yoga classrooms at each of the eight schools they service.

The bulletproof classrooms will be made from repurposed materials, lowering the cost of each building and assisting to save the environment.

“It’s the materials that would otherwise go to landfill sites,” says Appelby.

Each classroom will cost R300 000 but, considering the benefits of the yoga programme, she says, it will be worth it.

“It’s unbelievable. Our teachers have reported that after a yoga session kids are quieter, calmer and there are fewer fights.

A lot of kindness comes out through lesson plans and many go home and teach their siblings yoga.”

The Shala Cape Town Yoga School, which has been a partner of the project since 2009, is also working towards the goal of building these eight classrooms.

For the past 10 years, the school has held various fundraising classes and events, donated yoga mats and volunteered teaching hours for school yoga programmes.

Additionally, The Shala has helped to train Earthchild Project facilitators to teach yoga themselves,” says Thomas Sheehy, co-owner of the yoga school.

The reason behind the long-standing partnership, he says, is to create meaningful and sustainable change by providing practical skills in how to live a holistic, balanced lifestyle with a focus on self-awareness, health and the environment.

“We encourage anybody who may be interested in this important work to get involved by donating time, expertise and finances in any way possible,” he says, adding that many students of The Earthchild Project’s programmes have graduated to become teachers and continue to invest in the communities.

At the time of print, its GivenGain fundraiser page had raised almost R150 000, half of the funds needed to build the second yoga classroom.

Lesley-Ann Brandt, a Cape Town-born actor on Netflix and Fox’s Lucifer, is also on board, having launched the #carelikeademon campaign to assist The Earthchild Project in achieving its goal.V To support The Earthchild Project, visit www.gofundme.com/f/21-day-urban-yoga-challenge or givengain.com/ap/yogashala/ or visit its website at earthchildproject.org.

The Earthchild Project’s yoga sessions have proven to relieve the stress and anger in children of two disadvantaged Cape Town communities, and now the organisation is hoping to create permanent calming spaces to host the classes.

The project works with 3 500 children and 300 teachers in eight schools in Lavender Hill and Khayelitsha.

It aims to instil mindfulness in its beneficiaries, through yoga, and to teach them practical gardening know-how in each of the schools’ organic gardens, which double as calming outdoor gardens.

Currently, yoga sessions are held in spare classrooms, school halls or outside, but Carly Appelby, communications and marketing manager for the project, says this is not ideal.

“Kids have to practice outside and being outside is not ideal a lot of the time.

“The Earthchild Project has identified the need for these children to have a space that is quiet and safe.”

Subsequently, it has begun to raise money to build dedicated yoga classrooms at each of the eight schools they service.

The bulletproof classrooms will be made from repurposed materials, lowering the cost of each building and assisting to save the environment.

“It’s the materials that would otherwise go to landfill sites,” says Appelby.

Each classroom will cost R300 000 but, considering the benefits of the yoga programme, she says, it will be worth it.

“It’s unbelievable. Our teachers have reported that after a yoga session kids are quieter, calmer and there are fewer fights.

A lot of kindness comes out through lesson plans and many go home and teach their siblings yoga.”

The Shala Cape Town Yoga School, which has been a partner of the project since 2009, is also working towards the goal of building these eight classrooms.

For the past 10 years, the school has held various fundraising classes and events, donated yoga mats and volunteered teaching hours for school yoga programmes.

Additionally, The Shala has helped to train Earthchild Project facilitators to teach yoga themselves,” says Thomas Sheehy, co-owner of the yoga school.

The reason behind the long-standing partnership, he says, is to create meaningful and sustainable change by providing practical skills in how to live a holistic, balanced lifestyle with a focus on self-awareness, health and the environment.

“We encourage anybody who may be interested in this important work to get involved by donating time, expertise and finances in any way possible,” he says, adding that many students of The Earthchild Project’s programmes have graduated to become teachers and continue to invest in the communities.

At the time of print, its GivenGain fundraiser page had raised almost R150 000, half of the funds needed to build the second yoga classroom.

Lesley-Ann Brandt, a Cape Town-born actor on Netflix and Fox’s Lucifer, is also on board, having launched the #carelikeademon campaign to assist The Earthchild Project in achieving its goal.V To support The Earthchild Project, visit www.gofundme.com/f/21-day-urban-yoga-challenge or givengain.com/ap/yogashala/ or visit its website at earthchildproject.org.

The Earthchild Project’s yoga sessions have proven to relieve the stress and anger in children of two disadvantaged Cape Town communities, and now the organisation is hoping to create permanent calming spaces to host the classes.

The project works with 3 500 children and 300 teachers in eight schools in Lavender Hill and Khayelitsha.

It aims to instil mindfulness in its beneficiaries, through yoga, and to teach them practical gardening know-how in each of the schools’ organic gardens, which double as calming outdoor gardens.

Currently, yoga sessions are held in spare classrooms, school halls or outside, but Carly Appelby, communications and marketing manager for the project, says this is not ideal.

“Kids have to practice outside and being outside is not ideal a lot of the time.

“The Earthchild Project has identified the need for these children to have a space that is quiet and safe.”

Subsequently, it has begun to raise money to build dedicated yoga classrooms at each of the eight schools they service.

The bulletproof classrooms will be made from repurposed materials.

This method is intended to lower the cost of each building and assist to save the environment.

“It’s the materials that would otherwise go to landfill sites,” says Appelby.

Each classroom will cost R300 000 but, considering the benefits of the yoga programme, she says, it will be worth it.

“It’s unbelievable. Our teachers have reported that after a yoga session kids are quieter, calmer and there are fewer fights.

A lot of kindness comes out through lesson plans and many go home and teach their siblings yoga.”

The Shala Cape Town Yoga School, which has been a partner of the project since 2009, is also working towards the goal of building these eight classrooms.

For the past 10 years, the school has held various fundraising classes and events, donated yoga mats and volunteered teaching hours for school yoga programmes.

Additionally, The Shala has helped to train Earthchild Project facilitators to teach yoga themselves,” says Thomas Sheehy, co-owner of the yoga school.

The reason behind the long-standing partnership, he says, is to create meaningful and sustainable change by providing practical skills in how to live a holistic, balanced lifestyle with a focus on self-awareness, health and the environment.

“We encourage anybody who may be interested in this important work to get involved by donating time, expertise and finances in any way possible,” he says, adding that many students of The Earthchild Project’s programmes have graduated to become teachers and continue to invest in the communities.

At the time of print, its GivenGain fundraiser page had raised almost R150 000, half of the funds needed to build the second yoga classroom.

Lesley-Ann Brandt, a Cape Town-born actor on Netflix and Fox’s Lucifer, is also on board, having launched the #carelikeademon campaign to assist The Earthchild Project in achieving its goal.V To support The Earthchild Project, visit www.gofundme.com/f/21-day-urban-yoga-challenge or givengain.com/ap/yogashala/ or visit its website at earthchildproject.org.

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