Identikidz tags help reunite 318 lost children

2020-01-16 06:00
The City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme has tagged more than 121 335 kids this school holidays.

The City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme has tagged more than 121 335 kids this school holidays.

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Thanks to the City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme, 318 children who were lost on 16 of the Western Cape’s beaches were reunited with their parents this school holidays.

Since the start of the programme in mid-December more than 121 335 children have been tagged.

The programme, which registers and issues young beach visitors with an identification armband, has grown significantly. Already nearly 50% more children were tagged this season.

The City is quick to point out, however, that it is not a babysitting service and should not replace the responsibility of parents to supervise their children at all times while they’re on the beach.

City’s Mayco member for community services and health, councillor Zahid Badroodien, says it simply means that should a child wander off, the City is able to find their family.

“All the children who were lost on our beaches were reunited with loved ones and to date this year, there has been a decrease in the number of children lost. For the same time during the previous season, 82 519 children were tagged and 523 lost,” says Badroodien.

Factors which contributed to children going missing on beaches include:

. Children come to the beaches without parents or an adult;

. Parents are intoxicated and don’t realise the child is gone;

. Parents who leave the beach without their children; and

. Parents do not supervise their children while they are on the beach.

In terms of water safety, there have been no further drowning incidents since before Christmas, with the confirmed number of fatalities at 13.

“We continue to run awareness campaigns to highlight the most common reasons for drowning, to encourage water safety and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming.

“Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety and our lifeguards have their hands full keeping everyone safe,” says Badroodien.

The programme concluded on Sunday 12 January. The weather is set to remain ideal for the beach as the peak of summer approaches and bathers are reminded to heed the instructions of lifeguards and to obey the rules which are there for their safety.

“There are still many beach-going days ahead and I want to commend the lifeguards for a job well done. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, and to not drink and swim,” adds Badroodien.

Thanks to the City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme, 318 children who were lost on 16 of the Western Cape’s beaches were reunited with their parents this school holidays.

Since the start of the programme in mid-December (“Identikids makes a return to beaches,” People’s Post 17 December), more than 121 335 children have been tagged. The programme, which registers and issues young beach visitors with an identification armband, has grown significantly. Already nearly 50% more children were tagged this season.

The City is quick to point out, however, that it is not a babysitting service and should not replace the responsibility of parents to supervise their children at all times while they’re on the beach.

City’s Mayco member for community services and health, councillor Zahid Badroodien, says it simply means that should a child wander off, the City is able to find their family.

“All the children who were lost on our beaches were reunited with loved ones and to date this year, there has been a decrease in the number of children lost. For the same time during the previous season, 82 519 children were tagged and 523 lost,” says Badroodien.

Factors which contributed to children going missing on beaches include:

. Children come to the beaches without parents or an adult;

. Parents are intoxicated and don’t realise the child is gone;

. Parents who leave the beach without their children; and

. Parents do not supervise their children while they are on the beach.

In terms of water safety, there have been no further drowning incidents since before Christmas, with the confirmed number of fatalities at 13.

“We continue to run awareness campaigns to highlight the most common reasons for drowning, to encourage water safety and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety and our lifeguards have their hands full keeping everyone safe,” says Badroodien.

The programme concluded on Sunday 12 January. The weather is set to remain ideal for the beach as the peak of summer approaches and bathers are reminded to heed the instructions of lifeguards and to obey the rules which are there for their safety.

“There are still many beach-going days ahead and I want to commend the lifeguards for a job well done. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, and to not drink and swim,” adds Badroodien.

Thanks to the City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme, 318 children who were lost on 16 of the Western Cape’s beaches were reunited with their parents this school holidays.

Since the start of the programme in mid-December (“Identikids makes a return to beaches,” People’s Post 17 December), more than 121 335 children have been tagged. The programme, which registers and issues young beach visitors with an identification armband, has grown significantly. Already nearly 50% more children were tagged this season.

The City is quick to point out, however, that it is not a babysitting service and should not replace the responsibility of parents to supervise their children at all times while they’re on the beach.

City’s Mayco member for community services and health, councillor Zahid Badroodien, says it simply means that should a child wander off, the City is able to find their family.

“All the children who were lost on our beaches were reunited with loved ones and to date this year, there has been a decrease in the number of children lost. For the same time during the previous season, 82 519 children were tagged and 523 lost,” says Badroodien.

Factors which contributed to children going missing on beaches include:

. Children come to the beaches without parents or an adult;

. Parents are intoxicated and don’t realise the child is gone;

. Parents who leave the beach without their children; and

. Parents do not supervise their children while they are on the beach.

In terms of water safety, there have been no further drowning incidents since before Christmas, with the confirmed number of fatalities at 13.

“We continue to run awareness campaigns to highlight the most common reasons for drowning, to encourage water safety and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety and our lifeguards have their hands full keeping everyone safe,” says Badroodien.

The programme concluded on Sunday 12 January. The weather is set to remain ideal for the beach as the peak of summer approaches and bathers are reminded to heed the instructions of lifeguards and to obey the rules which are there for their safety.

“There are still many beach-going days ahead and I want to commend the lifeguards for a job well done. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, and to not drink and swim,” adds Badroodien.

Thanks to the City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme, 318 children who were lost on 16 of the Western Cape’s beaches were reunited with their parents this school holidays.

Since the start of the programme in mid-December (“Identikids makes a return to beaches,” People’s Post 17 December), more than 121 335 children have been tagged. The programme, which registers and issues young beach visitors with an identification armband, has grown significantly. Already nearly 50% more children were tagged this season.

The City is quick to point out, however, that it is not a babysitting service and should not replace the responsibility of parents to supervise their children at all times while they’re on the beach.

City’s Mayco member for community services and health, councillor Zahid Badroodien, says it simply means that should a child wander off, the City is able to find their family.

“All the children who were lost on our beaches were reunited with loved ones and to date this year, there has been a decrease in the number of children lost. For the same time during the previous season, 82 519 children were tagged and 523 lost,” says Badroodien.

Factors which contributed to children going missing on beaches include:

. Children come to the beaches without parents or an adult;

. Parents are intoxicated and don’t realise the child is gone;

. Parents who leave the beach without their children; and

. Parents do not supervise their children while they are on the beach.

In terms of water safety, there have been no further drowning incidents since before Christmas, with the confirmed number of fatalities at 13.

“We continue to run awareness campaigns to highlight the most common reasons for drowning, to encourage water safety and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety and our lifeguards have their hands full keeping everyone safe,” says Badroodien.

The programme concluded on Sunday 12 January. The weather is set to remain ideal for the beach as the peak of summer approaches and bathers are reminded to heed the instructions of lifeguards and to obey the rules which are there for their safety.

“There are still many beach-going days ahead and I want to commend the lifeguards for a job well done. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, and to not drink and swim,” adds Badroodien.

Thanks to the City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme, 318 children who were lost on 16 of the Western Cape’s beaches were reunited with their parents this school holidays.

Since the start of the programme in mid-December (“Identikids makes a return to beaches,” People’s Post 17 December), more than 121 335 children have been tagged. The programme, which registers and issues young beach visitors with an identification armband, has grown significantly. Already nearly 50% more children were tagged this season.

The City is quick to point out, however, that it is not a babysitting service and should not replace the responsibility of parents to supervise their children at all times while they’re on the beach.

City’s Mayco member for community services and health, councillor Zahid Badroodien, says it simply means that should a child wander off, the City is able to find their family.

“All the children who were lost on our beaches were reunited with loved ones and to date this year, there has been a decrease in the number of children lost. For the same time during the previous season, 82 519 children were tagged and 523 lost,” says Badroodien.

Factors which contributed to children going missing on beaches include:

. Children come to the beaches without parents or an adult;

. Parents are intoxicated and don’t realise the child is gone;

. Parents who leave the beach without their children; and

. Parents do not supervise their children while they are on the beach.

In terms of water safety, there have been no further drowning incidents since before Christmas, with the confirmed number of fatalities at 13.

“We continue to run awareness campaigns to highlight the most common reasons for drowning, to encourage water safety and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety and our lifeguards have their hands full keeping everyone safe,” says Badroodien.

The programme concluded on Sunday 12 January. The weather is set to remain ideal for the beach as the peak of summer approaches and bathers are reminded to heed the instructions of lifeguards and to obey the rules which are there for their safety.

“There are still many beach-going days ahead and I want to commend the lifeguards for a job well done. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, and to not drink and swim,” adds Badroodien.

Thanks to the City of Cape Town’s Identikidz programme, 318 children who were lost on 16 of the Western Cape’s beaches were reunited with their parents this school holidays.

Since the start of the programme in mid-December (“Identikids makes a return to beaches,” People’s Post 17 December), more than 121 335 children have been tagged.

The programme, which registers and issues young beach visitors with an identification armband, has grown significantly. Already nearly 50% more children were tagged this season.

The City is quick to point out, however, that it is not a babysitting service and should not replace the responsibility of parents to supervise their children at all times while they’re on the beach.

City’s Mayco member for community services and health, councillor Zahid Badroodien, says it simply means that should a child wander off, the City is able to find their family. “All the children who were lost on our beaches were reunited with loved ones and to date this year, there has been a decrease in the number of children lost. For the same time during the previous season, 82 519 children were tagged and 523 lost,” says Badroodien.

Factors which contributed to children going missing on beaches include:

. Children come to the beaches without parents or an adult;

. Parents are intoxicated and don’t realise the child is gone;

. Parents who leave the beach without their children; and

. Parents do not supervise their children while they are on the beach.

In terms of water safety, there have been no further drowning incidents since before Christmas, with the confirmed number of fatalities at 13.

“We continue to run awareness campaigns to highlight the most common reasons for drowning, to encourage water safety and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety and our lifeguards have their hands full keeping everyone safe,” says Badroodien.

The programme concluded on Sunday 12 January. The weather is set to remain ideal for the beach as the peak of summer approaches and bathers are reminded to heed the instructions of lifeguards and to obey the rules which are there for their safety.

“There are still many beach-going days ahead and I want to commend the lifeguards for a job well done. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, and to not drink and swim,” adds Badroodien.

NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/News
Traffic Alerts
Traffic
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.