Kangaroo care can save babies

2019-06-06 06:01
Trevlynn Moses from Mitchell’s Plain providing Kangaroo Mother Care to her premature twin boys at Groote Schuur Hospital’s Neonatal Unit.

Trevlynn Moses from Mitchell’s Plain providing Kangaroo Mother Care to her premature twin boys at Groote Schuur Hospital’s Neonatal Unit.

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The City of Cape Town’s Health Department and the Western Cape health department are encouraging mothers to make use of the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) technique.

The International Kangaroo Mother Care Awareness Day is a global event which is celebrated on 15 May annually by parents, communities, organisations and healthcare institutions that appreciate and acknowledge the benefits of KMC.

“The Western Cape Government Health has adopted and implemented the Kangaroo Mother Care policy and programme in our healthcare facilities to decrease the morbidity and mortality of newborn infants in South Africa. Implementing this policy has become an invaluable and integral part of our management in the preterm neonate. We are continuously striving to create awareness and improve the standard of Kangaroo Mother Care for newborn care at all the levels of healthcare, in all settings, within the Western Cape and the rest of South Africa,” says provincial health minister, Doctor Nomafrench Mbombo.

KMC is a method of caring for a baby where the mother nurses the infant on her bare chest day and night. The infant only wears a woollen cap and nappy and is kept upright using a piece of cloth wrapped around the mother’s chest.

The mother wears a shirt over the infant.

This skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby was first used in Colombia, South America, in the late 1970s with phenomenal success for babies born with low birth weight (less than 2,5 kg). Since then KMC was integrated into hospital care around the world.

Mayco member for community services and health, Doctor Zahid Badroodien says: “The skin-to-skin contact with the mother regulates the baby’s body temperature to the same as in the uterus, making the infant feel safe. The baby can breastfeed on demand and picks up weight much faster. KMC also provides the baby with stimulation, love and protection.”

Kangaroo Mother Care is critical for nursing premature and low birth weight infants, reducing the time the baby needs to stay in hospital and decreasing hospital costs.

The risk factors that lead to low birth weight include:

. Alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy;

. Smoking during pregnancy;

. Mother’s poor nutrition.

Besides being good for bonding, it also provides warmth to the baby, regulates the baby’s heartbeat, and enhances lactation. Babies have direct access to the breast and can feed at any time.

Trevlynn Moses (31) from Tafelsig, was expecting to meet her newborns on the Thursday 16 May, but she went into early labour and delivered her twin baby boys on Tuesday 2 April at the Mitchell’s Plain Maternity Obstetric Unit (MOU) with birth weights of 1600g and 1640g.

Due to the babies’ low birth weight, she and her babies were transferred to Groote Schuur Hospital’s Neonatal Unit where Kangaroo Mother Care was practiced to improve her babies’ health and increase their birth weight.

“I could definitely see the benefits of KMC with my babies because their weight improved within the first three days, they were breastfeeding nicely, and I have really developed a strong bond with them,” she says.

“To KMC my babies took minimal effort. My babies were dressed in just their nappies with their heads covered with a cap and placed in an upright position against my bare chest, and we were covered with a blanket for warmth.”

All Western Cape Government Health facilities have implemented the KMC policy in their facilities.

“Kangaroo Mother Care is an effective way to help meet a premature baby’s basic needs for warmth, nutrition, stimulation, and protection from infection. Parents of low birth weight less than 2500g or preterm babies born before 37 weeks gestation are encouraged to use KMC which involves continuous skin-to-skin contact with the baby for at least 20 hours every day and exclusive breastfeeding or cup-feeding,” says Sister Karlien La Grange, assistant manager for nursing at Mowbray Maternity Hospital.

Mowbray Maternity delivers about 900 babies per month of which little over 15% are low birth weight. Despite its potential to save thousands of babies every year, KMC has not had widespread scale-up in either high-income or low-income settings.

For babies who are receiving KMC treatment, the increased rate of growth and fewer infections translate into significant economic benefits to the health service in terms of shorter hospital stay and reduced bed occupancy. The cost of care is further reduced in that the parents, particularly the mother, are physically involved in caring, thereby, reducing the nursing workload creating a significant addition to the workforce.

The City of Cape Town’s Health Department and the Western Cape health department are encouraging mothers to make use of the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) technique.

The International Kangaroo Mother Care Awareness Day is a global event which is celebrated on 15 May annually by parents, communities, organisations and healthcare institutions that appreciate and acknowledge the benefits of KMC.

“The Western Cape Government Health has adopted and implemented the Kangaroo Mother Care policy and programme in our healthcare facilities to decrease the morbidity and mortality of newborn infants in South Africa. Implementing this policy has become an invaluable and integral part of our management in the preterm neonate. We are continuously striving to create awareness and improve the standard of Kangaroo Mother Care for newborn care at all the levels of healthcare, in all settings, within the Western Cape and the rest of South Africa,” says provincial health minister, Doctor Nomafrench Mbombo.

KMC is a method of caring for a baby where the mother nurses the infant on her bare chest day and night. The infant only wears a woollen cap and nappy and is kept upright using a piece of cloth wrapped around the mother’s chest.

The mother wears a shirt over the infant.

This skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby was first used in Colombia, South America, in the late 1970s with phenomenal success for babies born with low birth weight (less than 2,5 kg). Since then KMC was integrated into hospital care around the world.

Mayco member for community services and health, Doctor Zahid Badroodien says: “The skin-to-skin contact with the mother regulates the baby’s body temperature to the same as in the uterus, making the infant feel safe. The baby can breastfeed on demand and picks up weight much faster. KMC also provides the baby with stimulation, love and protection.”

Kangaroo Mother Care is critical for nursing premature and low birth weight infants, reducing the time the baby needs to stay in hospital and decreasing hospital costs.

The risk factors that lead to low birth weight include:

. Alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy;

. Smoking during pregnancy;

. Mother’s poor nutrition.

Besides being good for bonding, it also provides warmth to the baby, regulates the baby’s heartbeat, and enhances lactation. Babies have direct access to the breast and can feed at any time.

Trevlynn Moses (31) from Tafelsig, was expecting to meet her newborns on the Thursday 16 May, but she went into early labour and delivered her twin baby boys on Tuesday 2 April at the Mitchell’s Plain Maternity Obstetric Unit (MOU) with birth weights of 1600g and 1640g.

Due to the babies’ low birth weight, she and her babies were transferred to Groote Schuur Hospital’s Neonatal Unit where Kangaroo Mother Care was practiced to improve her babies’ health and increase their birth weight.

“I could definitely see the benefits of KMC with my babies because their weight improved within the first three days, they were breastfeeding nicely, and I have really developed a strong bond with them,” she says.

“To KMC my babies took minimal effort. My babies were dressed in just their nappies with their heads covered with a cap and placed in an upright position against my bare chest, and we were covered with a blanket for warmth.”

All Western Cape Government Health facilities have implemented the KMC policy in their facilities.

“Kangaroo Mother Care is an effective way to help meet a premature baby’s basic needs for warmth, nutrition, stimulation, and protection from infection. Parents of low birth weight less than 2500g or preterm babies born before 37 weeks gestation are encouraged to use KMC which involves continuous skin-to-skin contact with the baby for at least 20 hours every day and exclusive breastfeeding or cup-feeding,” says Sister Karlien La Grange, assistant manager for nursing at Mowbray Maternity Hospital.

Mowbray Maternity delivers about 900 babies per month of which little over 15% are low birth weight.

Despite its potential to save thousands of babies every year, KMC has not had widespread scale-up in either high-income or low-income settings.

For babies who are receiving KMC treatment, the increased rate of growth and fewer infections translate into significant economic benefits to the health service in terms of shorter hospital stay and reduced bed occupancy. The cost of care is further reduced in that the parents, particularly the mother, are physically involved in caring, thereby, reducing the nursing workload creating a significant addition to the workforce.

The City of Cape Town’s Health Department and the Western Cape health department are encouraging mothers to make use of the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) technique.

The International Kangaroo Mother Care Awareness Day is a global event which is celebrated on 15 May annually by parents, communities, organisations and healthcare institutions that appreciate and acknowledge the benefits of KMC.

“The Western Cape Government Health has adopted and implemented the Kangaroo Mother Care policy and programme in our healthcare facilities to decrease the morbidity and mortality of newborn infants in South Africa. Implementing this policy has become an invaluable and integral part of our management in the preterm neonate. We are continuously striving to create awareness and improve the standard of Kangaroo Mother Care for newborn care at all the levels of healthcare, in all settings, within the Western Cape and the rest of South Africa,” says provincial health minister, Doctor Nomafrench Mbombo.

KMC is a method of caring for a baby where the mother nurses the infant on her bare chest day and night. The infant only wears a woollen cap and nappy and is kept upright using a piece of cloth wrapped around the mother’s chest. The mother wears a shirt over the infant.

This skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby was first used in Colombia, South America, in the late 1970s with phenomenal success for babies born with low birth weight (less than 2,5 kg). Since then KMC was integrated into hospital care around the world.

Mayco member for community services and health, Doctor Zahid Badroodien says: “The skin-to-skin contact with the mother regulates the baby’s body temperature to the same as in the uterus, making the infant feel safe. The baby can breastfeed on demand and picks up weight much faster. KMC also provides the baby with stimulation, love and protection.”

Kangaroo Mother Care is critical for nursing premature and low birth weight infants, reducing the time the baby needs to stay in hospital and decreasing hospital costs.

The risk factors that lead to low birth weight include:

. Alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy;

. Smoking during pregnancy;

. Mother’s poor nutrition.

Besides being good for bonding, it also provides warmth to the baby, regulates the baby’s heartbeat, and enhances lactation. Babies have direct access to the breast and can feed at any time.

Trevlynn Moses (31) from Tafelsig, was expecting to meet her newborns on the Thursday 16 May, but she went into early labour and delivered her twin baby boys on Tuesday 2 April at the Mitchell’s Plain Maternity Obstetric Unit (MOU) with birth weights of 1600g and 1640g.

Due to the babies’ low birth weight, she and her babies were transferred to Groote Schuur Hospital’s Neonatal Unit where Kangaroo Mother Care was practiced to improve her babies’ health and increase their birth weight.

“I could definitely see the benefits of KMC with my babies because their weight improved within the first three days, they were breastfeeding nicely, and I have really developed a strong bond with them,” she says.

“To KMC my babies took minimal effort. My babies were dressed in just their nappies with their heads covered with a cap and placed in an upright position against my bare chest, and we were covered with a blanket for warmth.”

All Western Cape Government Health facilities have implemented the KMC policy in their facilities.

“Kangaroo Mother Care is an effective way to help meet a premature baby’s basic needs for warmth, nutrition, stimulation, and protection from infection. Parents of low birth weight less than 2500g or preterm babies born before 37 weeks gestation are encouraged to use KMC which involves continuous skin-to-skin contact with the baby for at least 20 hours every day and exclusive breastfeeding or cup-feeding,” says Sister Karlien La Grange, assistant manager for nursing at Mowbray Maternity Hospital.

Mowbray Maternity delivers about 900 babies per month of which little over 15% are low birth weight. Despite its potential to save thousands of babies every year, KMC has not had widespread scale-up in either high-income or low-income settings.

For babies who are receiving KMC treatment, the increased rate of growth and fewer infections translate into significant economic benefits to the health service in terms of shorter hospital stay and reduced bed occupancy. The cost of care is further reduced in that the parents, particularly the mother, are physically involved in caring, thereby, reducing the nursing workload creating a significant addition to the workforce.

The City of Cape Town’s Health Department and the Western Cape health department are encouraging mothers to make use of the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) technique.

The International Kangaroo Mother Care Awareness Day is a global event which is celebrated on 15 May annually by parents, communities, organisations and healthcare institutions that appreciate and acknowledge the benefits of KMC.

“The Western Cape Government Health has adopted and implemented the Kangaroo Mother Care policy and programme in our healthcare facilities to decrease the morbidity and mortality of newborn infants in South Africa. Implementing this policy has become an invaluable and integral part of our management in the preterm neonate. We are continuously striving to create awareness and improve the standard of Kangaroo Mother Care for newborn care at all the levels of healthcare, in all settings, within the Western Cape and the rest of South Africa,” says provincial health minister, Doctor Nomafrench Mbombo.

KMC is a method of caring for a baby where the mother nurses the infant on her bare chest day and night. The infant only wears a woollen cap and nappy and is kept upright using a piece of cloth wrapped around the mother’s chest.

The mother wears a shirt over the infant.

This skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby was first used in Colombia, South America, in the late 1970s with phenomenal success for babies born with low birth weight (less than 2,5 kg). Since then KMC was integrated into hospital care around the world.

Mayco member for community services and health, Doctor Zahid Badroodien says: “The skin-to-skin contact with the mother regulates the baby’s body temperature to the same as in the uterus, making the infant feel safe. The baby can breastfeed on demand and picks up weight much faster. KMC also provides the baby with stimulation, love and protection.”

Kangaroo Mother Care is critical for nursing premature and low birth weight infants, reducing the time the baby needs to stay in hospital and decreasing hospital costs.

The risk factors that lead to low birth weight include:

. Alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy;

. Smoking during pregnancy;

. Mother’s poor nutrition.

Besides being good for bonding, it also provides warmth to the baby, regulates the baby’s heartbeat, and enhances lactation. Babies have direct access to the breast and can feed at any time.

Trevlynn Moses (31) from Tafelsig, was expecting to meet her newborns on the Thursday 16 May, but she went into early labour and delivered her twin baby boys on Tuesday 2 April at the Mitchell’s Plain Maternity Obstetric Unit (MOU) with birth weights of 1600g and 1640g.

Due to the babies’ low birth weight, she and her babies were transferred to Groote Schuur Hospital’s Neonatal Unit where Kangaroo Mother Care was practiced to improve her babies’ health and increase their birth weight.

“I could definitely see the benefits of KMC with my babies because their weight improved within the first three days, they were breastfeeding nicely, and I have really developed a strong bond with them,” she says.

“To KMC my babies took minimal effort. My babies were dressed in just their nappies with their heads covered with a cap and placed in an upright position against my bare chest, and we were covered with a blanket for warmth.”

All Western Cape Government Health facilities have implemented the KMC policy in their facilities.

“Kangaroo Mother Care is an effective way to help meet a premature baby’s basic needs for warmth, nutrition, stimulation, and protection from infection. Parents of low birth weight less than 2500g or preterm babies born before 37 weeks gestation are encouraged to use KMC which involves continuous skin-to-skin contact with the baby for at least 20 hours every day and exclusive breastfeeding or cup-feeding,” says Sister Karlien La Grange, assistant manager for nursing at Mowbray Maternity Hospital.

Mowbray Maternity delivers about 900 babies per month of which little over 15% are low birth weight.

Despite its potential to save thousands of babies every year, KMC has not had widespread scale-up in either high-income or low-income settings.

For babies who are receiving KMC treatment, the increased rate of growth and fewer infections translate into significant economic benefits to the health service in terms of shorter hospital stay and reduced bed occupancy.

The cost of care is further reduced in that the parents, particularly the mother, are physically involved in caring, thereby, reducing the nursing workload creating a significant addition to the workforce.

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