Physio’ Hugh makes it to his 100th tourney

2018-10-18 06:03
Hugh Everson.

Hugh Everson.

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Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and along with coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements.

“The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family. “My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players­.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics­.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries­.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements­.

“The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go.

“David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years.

“The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements.

“The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad.

“She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics­.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements­.

“The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players­.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics­.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go.

“David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years.

“The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements.

“The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad.

“She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December­.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics­.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements­. “The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic. “I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements. “The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family. My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible.”

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic. “I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements. “The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family. My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible.”

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December­.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics­.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements­.

“The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

Hugh Everson from Ottery, physiotherapist of the SA Sevens team, will be the second physiotherapist on the HSBC World Sevens Series who will reach the milestone of 100 HSBC World Series tournaments at the Cape Town Sevens on Saturday 8 December­.

“Uncle Hugh”, as he is affectionately known by the Blitzboks, is the person who tends to all their aches and pains, and alongwith coaches Neil Powell and Renfred Dazel, he is one of the father figures to the players.

“William Koong of Fiji was the first and this is a huge milestone for me. If I look back there are a few tournaments that are memorable, but the most memorable tournament for me was in Port Elizabeth in 2013 when Madiba passed away and the moment of silence observed in honour of our remarkable leader. We eventually went on to win the tournament, which was quite an emotional moment,” he says.

Hong Kong is his favourite city to visit every time in terms of the atmosphere in the stadium, but also for shopping for electronics­.

According to Everson the most common injuries in Sevens rugby include soft tissue contusions, ankle sprains, and knee and shoulder injuries.

“Through the years I’ve seen many players come and go in the SA team and the player that always surprises friends and foes is Branco du Preez. Some of the bigger opponents tend to underestimate him due to his size, but when they come into his defensive channel they soon realise that this ‘little guy’ packs a mean punch,” he says.

Everson is originally from Kimberley and moved to Cape Town in February 2007 where he started a private practice at Milnerton Mediclinic.

“I was involved with the Springbok u.19 and SA schools teams between 2002 and 2007 and in October of 2007 Paul Treu, the coach, recruited me to join the Blitzboks. I am very blessed to have the job I have. Many people would love to be able to do what I do for a living and still travel the world,” Everson says.

When he is not involved with the Blitzboks he spends time in is private practice and with his son, Kieran. His hobbies are gardening and DIY around the house and on his bucket list is to take Kieran to Disneyland in the USA.

“When I started at the Blitzboks not everyone was supporting Sevens but through the years the profile has been significantly elevated. In South Africa, I think a large reason for this is the media and also our sponsorship partners who contracted David van der Sandt to accompany the team wherever we go. David’s work behind the scenes to get Sevens footage on the various news channels as well as Supersport has definitely raised awareness among the public. The reason why it is popular now is the brand of rugby the Blitsies play and the success achieved over the years. The success of the team can also be attributed to the hard work put in by management and players, but we make sure that there is enough time for fun. We also acknowledge that we not only work with an athlete but with the person holistically,” he says.

Whenever he meets people from Kimberley, they are proud of him and his achievements­. “The people of Kimberley had a role to play in my development into the person that I have become. I grew up in a community where there was a culture of ‘your child is my child’. I try my best to be an inspiration to youngsters, to show them that through hard work and dedication and getting an opportunity, one can make your dreams a reality. The most important aspect in my life is my family.

“My wife Tanya has been my rock through the years. She has kept our home going and gave me peace of mind that Kieran was safe and well looked after when I was abroad. She always ensured that everything that I needed was ready for when I travelled, including my clothes and snacks for the flight. Dropping me off and fetching me at the airport wasn’t always easy, but she made it possible,” Everson says.

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