Prepping for Carnival on track

2020-03-05 06:04
Some of the colourful art pieces that will bring the theme to life. PHOTOS: Samantha lee-Jacobs

Some of the colourful art pieces that will bring the theme to life. PHOTOS: Samantha lee-Jacobs

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With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them. “The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance. “To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman. “This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available at www.capetowncarnival.com.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book a seat or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available.

Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information..

With enough frills, glitter, sequin, paint and everything in between to line the entire fan walk, the production of the costumes and floats for this year’s Cape Town Carnival are well under way.

With a conscious mind of the environmental impact that an event of its magnitude can have, this year sees the team reusing as much as possible while creating the thousands of costumes and props that will be on display.

In its 11th edition, the Cape Town Carnival will light up the streets in an explosion of colour and sound in keeping to the “Incredible journey: sounds of South Africa” theme.

From a giant eland representing the contributions of the first artists – the San, to the traditional ‘big lady’ redressed in a funky hairstyle, you can expect to see it all – even a gigantic bust of Nelson Mandela all accompanied by 2 000 ecstatic and energetic performers dressed in traditional regalia.

This year’s carnival takes place on Human Rights Day, Saturday 21 March along the 1.2km of the Green Point Fan Walk, and organisers expect more than 50 000 people to turn up.

Hundreds of workers are busy behind the scenes. Some of them are students who have volunteered their time to put together the show.

Levern Dewee is one of them.

“The carnival has become such a part of our lives that I cannot imagine my life without it now,” says Dewee.

Brad Baard, creative director of the Carnival, says: “South Africa is known worldwide for its rich texture of cross-culture influences – we’re a country with 11 official languages, after all – so it’s little wonder that this year’s theme, which showcases the nation’s incredibly diverse cultures through music, song, dance and art, will offer up an almighty pattern of interwoven colour, sound, creativity and captivating energy.”

Some of the costumes worn by the lead performers will be a traditional Zulu bridal gown, and cultural Xhosa, Ndebele and Sesotho clothing.

Baard explains: “The costumes is an acknowledgment of the longevity of cultural influences.”

Angela MacPherson, head of float-building for the Carnival, says this year they have gone bigger and better.

“Our aim has always been to create joy and unity through creativity, so our workshop activity is particularly evident of the collaboration needed to bring the floats, costumes and puppets to life,” she says.

Professor Rachel Jafta, chair of Cape Town Carnival Trust, says the extravaganza creates a great sense of confidence.

“What’s beautiful to see is how this process instils a wonderful sense of confidence, pride and purpose in these young people. They leave here with their eyes wide open and their imaginations alive,” says Jafta.

Expect to see something different as well with a 50s inspired dance number aboard a float that represents the pulsating Saturday night Sophiatown beer halls and world-famous black South African singers and musicians.

Chante Wildeman, lead performer who will be bringing this float to life alongside Unathi Makhambi, says it is a great honour to celebrate this era through dance.

“To bring this music alive again after all these years is amazing,” says Wildeman.

“This was to them what house music is to us today,” she says.

She added that the celebration shows that “we got our soil in us” and that we are all connected through culture, music and dance.

“It’s a tribute to our incredible South African music and the energy of that era, infused with traditional African sound and the influence of visiting American musicians – it’s a float that reflects the energy of creativity responding to challenging times,” says Baard.

The show will be closed out with the AfroFuture float which represents a vision of what the city of tomorrow could look like.

“What the wonder of AfroFuture typifies – as does this year’s overall theme – is that with our incredible diversity, massive talent and potential, South Africa has everything we need to build an amazing future together,” says Baard.

People’s Post is one of the media partners of the event.

The Cape Town Carnival is a free-to-view public event however seating packages are available. Visit www.capetowncarnival.com to book or for more information.

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