Relief as water tariffs come down; smile

2018-12-06 06:02

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed.

However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought.

Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years.

These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a
statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of
recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years.

These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years.

These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement. “Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought.

“Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

Capetonians will have some relief from water restrictions this month, after the City of Cape Town announced the tariffs and restrictions will be lowered to Level 3.

This came into effect on Saturday 1 December and increases the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day.

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape water supply system, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town Metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead, mayor Dan Plato says in a statement.

“Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed.

“However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.”

Mayco member for informal settlements, water, waste services and energy, Xanthea Limberg, adds: “We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years.

“These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while at the same time providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole, as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.”

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery.

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