Slave Route Challenge celebrates 10 years

2020-02-13 06:03
Some of the ecstatic runners make their way through Darling Street during last year’s event.

Some of the ecstatic runners make their way through Darling Street during last year’s event.

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While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000. This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception.

The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum.

The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration.

“We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer. The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online.

Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run also marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer.

The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations.

The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison.

Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000.

This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield.

Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “We are proud to be associated with the Slave Route Challenge Powered by Brimstone. Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration. We are proud to celebrate 10 years of meaningful impact together with this event.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

While entries for this year’s Slave Route Challenge have been closed, interested participants can still submit their applications online. Organisers have extended the online registration to Friday 14 February, with the main run taking place on Sunday 23 February. This year’s run marks 10 years since the race’s inception. The event caters for the avid runner or walker and novice with a half marathon, 10km run, 10km walk and 5km fun run/walk on offer. The added appeal of this event is that it takes ownership of the country’s past, changes the narrative of South Africa’s heritage and transforms it into a legacy for future generations. The route starts in front of the City Hall, in Darling Street, right in front of the balcony where the late President Nelson Mandela made his first speech after his release from Victor Verster Prison. Runners and walkers get an opportunity to see some of Cape Town’s breathtakingly beautiful views including District Six, the Company Gardens, Bo-Kaap, the Castle of Good Hope, the Hurling Swing Pump, SA Jewish Museum, Slave Bell, Dorp Street Mosque, Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum, Gallows Hill, the majestic Atlantic Seaboard, Fort Wynyard, Prestwich Memorial, Iziko Slave Lodge, the Slave Tree Plaque and Palestine Museum. The run will finish on the Grand Parade where the Whipping Post used to be.

Each year the race has a commemorative medal and a race beneficiary. Last year the race beneficiary, Mary Harding, received R65 000. This year the race beneficiary is Lofob – League Of the Friends Of the Blind. Lofob is based in Grassy Park and was established in 1933 as a registered non-profit, public benefit organisation serving the needs of blind and visually impaired children, youth and adults, and their families, throughout the Western Cape and further afield. Dr Armand Bam, CEO of Lofob, says: “Our rich heritage as an organisation serving those most impoverished and the significance of this race as a reminder of our country’s history, makes this a significant celebration.” V Log onto www.slaveroute.co.za for the route maps.

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