Sopa speaks to ‘wants and needs’

2020-02-27 06:03

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours.

“Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government.

The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours.

“Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers. “There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape.

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours. Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours. Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours. Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.” Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year. The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours. Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.” Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde. Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours. Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.”

Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde.

Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours.

“Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

The 2020 State of the Province Address (Sopa), delivered by Western Cape premier Alan Winde on Thursday in Rocklands, was his second in his five-year term since his election last year.

The address highlighted the successes of the past seven months and outlined the plans put in place by the current government for change, development, growth and improvement in the province.

Key matters raised in Winde’s speech were employment, electricity outages and economic growth.

Winde started his speech by outlining some of the recent successes in service delivery, including the safety plan and deployment of 500 additional law enforcement officials, and the province being named the top job creator in the country.

“In the national government stats released last week, it was announced that the Western Cape created 24 000 new jobs for the quarter, more than half of the net jobs created in our country. We are South Africa’s jobs province,” said Winde.

“When I delivered my first Sopa in July last year, we vowed to ‘get to work’. Over the past seven months, we have certainly done just that. Since being elected, I have visited dozens of communities, I have met with thousands of citizens, and we have received tens of thousands of emails, texts and calls, telling us what you want and need,” said Winde. “We have heard you. You don’t want smart cities and bullet trains. You want working cities and normal trains that get you to where you need to be, safely and on time. You want a government that focuses on getting the basics right, and actually delivers.” Winde shared a four-point plan to make the province less reliant on Eskom, therefore relieving residents of load shedding. The decision comes after an announcement by president Cyril Ramaphosa in his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February where he announced provinces could generate their own energy.

Winde said the province was a goldmine for renewable energy. However, he expressed concerns that the province may not be able to benefit as the president had not outlined the stipulations of producing its own energy.

After the spate of school break-ins and vandalism, the province would also look to install 30 high-security fences at schools each year for the next 30 years to keep learners and teachers safe, said Winde.

Further, Winde said the province would continue to fight for the management rights of the rail system in the province, stating “we can do it better”.

While this request has been denied on several occasions, Winde said they would conduct a feasibility study on moving control of rail away from the national government. The local government would also introduce a game-changing minibus pilot project which would use technology to monitor and improve the behaviour of taxi drivers.

“There will be increased investment in public transport infrastructure, including ranks, stops and shelters, to improve the daily experience of taxi commuters,” said Winde. Funding in excess of R250 million has been made available from the private sector, the national government and the City of Cape Town to ensure 1 000 unemployed youth are trained and placed in jobs in the next financial year.

The plans for the next five years in office were guided by the several visits conducted by Winde and his cabinet and includes safety and corruption concerns.

“Bolstering the forensic unit which looks into municipal matters to strengthen accountability at this level of government and to root out any risk for potential corruption,” he said.

“You told us your families are not safe because drugs, gangs and gender-based violence are tearing them apart. Within less than four months of taking office, we have delivered. In September, we launched a comprehensive, province-wide safety plan aimed at halving the murder rate,” he said.

More needed to be done in working together with other government departments and spheres, said Winde.

“I also have to be frank with you. South Africa is in bad shape. Last week, we heard from the president that youth unemployment is at an all-time high,” said Winde.

“Fewer jobs also mean less tax money, which means budget cuts to health and education departments across the country.”

He welcomed the decision to bolster youth employment and development programmes and offered some of the province’s successful projects as blueprints.

He stated that with more funding from the national government, this would be more successful and would assist in stemming the unemployment issue in the country.

Winde concluded his address with a promise to not rest until this change was felt by everyone in the Western Cape: “We will not slow down until you as the residents of this province see and feel the progress of our delivery first hand – our success is your success, and your success is ours. Our job together is to build a better South Africa. We dare not fail, as our future depends on it.”

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