Top cop outlines her new vision for WC

2020-01-16 06:00
Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata addresses the media at the premier’s office on Monday 6 December.

Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata addresses the media at the premier’s office on Monday 6 December.

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Recently appointed Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata, took up her post on Monday 6 January.

She kicked the day off with a meeting with the police’s Western Cape provincial management and community policing forum (CPF) representatives at the premier’s office.

Shortly afterwards, the deputy minister of police, Cassel Mathale, and the national commissioner of police, Gen Khehla Sitole, presented Matakata to the premier of the Western Cape, Alan Winde, and MEC for community safety, Albert Fritz.

Addressing the media after these two engagements, Matakata outlined a new vision for policing in the province.

High up on her list of priorities is the building of cohesion within the police’s Western Cape management team thereby ensuring police officers are accountable and responsive to community needs. That, in her view, will guarantee quality service delivery.

She acknowledged that policing the province is no mean feat, but, with all role players on board, she and her management team were set on stamping the authority of the state.

During her tenure, the capacitation of police stations as the first line of defence in dealing with serious violent crimes will be intensified. In essence, human and physical resources will be distributed to where the needs are.

Policing will also be supported by an effective detection service that will investigate and solve reported cases.

In a bid to ensure all citizens of the Western Cape are and feel safe, an effective intelligence capacity will underpin all policing efforts.

“I have been keeping an eye on the issue of crime in this province, including crimes against women and children plaguing certain communities. An aggressive response, that involves all stakeholders, is required. Also, the main generators of serious violent crimes, namely drugs, alcohol and illegal firearms, are what we will be focussing on,” says Matakata.

In her view, boots on the ground are key in addressing crime, but dealing with socio-economic factors that impede policing initiatives remains crucial.

Matakata appealed for support and commitment from all stakeholders.

Recently appointed Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata, took up her post on Monday 6 January.

She kicked the day off with a meeting with the police’s Western Cape provincial management and community policing forum (CPF) representatives at the premier’s office.

Shortly afterwards, the deputy minister of police, Cassel Mathale, and the national commissioner of police, Gen Khehla Sitole, presented Matakata to the premier of the Western Cape, Alan Winde, and MEC for community safety, Albert Fritz.

Addressing the media after these two engagements, Matakata outlined a new vision for policing in the province.

High up on her list of priorities is the building of cohesion within the police’s Western Cape management team thereby ensuring police officers are accountable and responsive to community needs. That, in her view, will guarantee quality service delivery.

She acknowledged that policing the province is no mean feat, but, with all role players on board, she and her management team were set on stamping the authority of the state.

During her tenure, the capacitation of police stations as the first line of defence in dealing with serious violent crimes will be intensified. In essence, human and physical resources will be distributed to where the needs are.

Policing will also be supported by an effective detection service that will investigate and solve reported cases.

In a bid to ensure all citizens of the Western Cape are and feel safe, an effective intelligence capacity will underpin all policing efforts.

“I have been keeping an eye on the issue of crime in this province, including crimes against women and children plaguing certain communities. An aggressive response, that involves all stakeholders, is required. Also, the main generators of serious violent crimes, namely drugs, alcohol and illegal firearms, are what we will be focussing on,” says Matakata.

In her view, boots on the ground are key in addressing crime, but dealing with socio-economic factors that impede policing initiatives remains crucial.

Matakata appealed for support and commitment from all stakeholders.

Recently appointed Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata, took up her post on Monday 6 January.

She kicked the day off with a meeting with the police’s Western Cape provincial management and community policing forum (CPF) representatives at the premier’s office.

Shortly afterwards, the deputy minister of police, Cassel Mathale, and the national commissioner of police, Gen Khehla Sitole, presented Matakata to the premier of the Western Cape, Alan Winde, and MEC for community safety, Albert Fritz.

Addressing the media after these two engagements, Matakata outlined a new vision for policing in the province.

High up on her list of priorities is the building of cohesion within the police’s Western Cape management team thereby ensuring police officers are accountable and responsive to community needs. That, in her view, will guarantee quality service delivery.

She acknowledged that policing the province is no mean feat, but, with all role players on board, she and her management team were set on stamping the authority of the state.

During her tenure, the capacitation of police stations as the first line of defence in dealing with serious violent crimes will be intensified. In essence, human and physical resources will be distributed to where the needs are.

Policing will also be supported by an effective detection service that will investigate and solve reported cases.

In a bid to ensure all citizens of the Western Cape are and feel safe, an effective intelligence capacity will underpin all policing efforts.

“I have been keeping an eye on the issue of crime in this province, including crimes against women and children plaguing certain communities. An aggressive response, that involves all stakeholders, is required. Also, the main generators of serious violent crimes, namely drugs, alcohol and illegal firearms, are what we will be focussing on,” says Matakata.

In her view, boots on the ground are key in addressing crime, but dealing with socio-economic factors that impede policing initiatives remains crucial.

Matakata appealed for support and commitment from all stakeholders.

Recently appointed Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata, took up her post on Monday 6 January.

She kicked the day off with a meeting with the police’s Western Cape provincial management and community policing forum (CPF) representatives at the premier’s office.

Shortly afterwards, the deputy minister of police, Cassel Mathale, and the national commissioner of police, Gen Khehla Sitole, presented Matakata to the premier of the Western Cape, Alan Winde, and MEC for community safety, Albert Fritz.

Addressing the media after these two engagements, Matakata outlined a new vision for policing in the province.

High up on her list of priorities is the building of cohesion within the police’s Western Cape management team thereby ensuring police officers are accountable and responsive to community needs.

That, in her view, will guarantee quality service delivery.

She acknowledged that policing the province is no mean feat, but, with all role players on board, she and her management team were set on stamping the authority of the state.

During her tenure, the capacitation of police stations as the first line of defence in dealing with serious violent crimes will be intensified. In essence, human and physical resources will be distributed to where the needs are.

Policing will also be supported by an effective detection service that will investigate and solve reported cases.

In a bid to ensure all citizens of the Western Cape are and feel safe, an effective intelligence capacity will underpin all policing efforts.

“I have been keeping an eye on the issue of crime in this province, including crimes against women and children plaguing certain communities. An aggressive response, that involves all stakeholders, is required. Also, the main generators of serious violent crimes, namely drugs, alcohol and illegal firearms, are what we will be focussing on,” says Matakata.

In her view, boots on the ground are key in addressing crime, but dealing with socio-economic factors that impede policing initiatives remains crucial.

Matakata appealed for support and commitment from all stakeholders.

Recently appointed Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata, took up her post on Monday 6 January.

She kicked the day off with a meeting with the police’s Western Cape provincial management and community policing forum (CPF) representatives at the premier’s office.

Shortly afterwards, the deputy minister of police, Cassel Mathale, and the national commissioner of police, Gen Khehla Sitole, presented Matakata to the premier of the Western Cape, Alan Winde, and MEC for community safety, Albert Fritz.

Addressing the media after these two engagements, Matakata outlined a new vision for policing in the province.

High up on her list of priorities is the building of cohesion within the police’s Western Cape management team thereby ensuring police officers are accountable and responsive to community needs.

That, in her view, will guarantee quality service delivery.

She acknowledged that policing the province is no mean feat, but, with all role players on board, she and her management team were set on stamping the authority of the state.

During her tenure, the capacitation of police stations as the first line of defence in dealing with serious violent crimes will be intensified. In essence, human and physical resources will be distributed to where the needs are.

Policing will also be supported by an effective detection service that will investigate and solve reported cases.

In a bid to ensure all citizens of the Western Cape are and feel safe, an effective intelligence capacity will underpin all policing efforts.

“I have been keeping an eye on the issue of crime in this province, including crimes against women and children plaguing certain communities. An aggressive response, that involves all stakeholders, is required. Also, the main generators of serious violent crimes, namely drugs, alcohol and illegal firearms, are what we will be focussing on,” says Matakata.

In her view, boots on the ground are key in addressing crime, but dealing with socio-economic factors that impede policing initiatives remains crucial.

Matakata appealed for support and commitment from all stakeholders.

Recently appointed Western Cape Provincial Commissioner, Lt Gen Yolisa Matakata, took up her post on Monday 6 January.

She kicked the day off with a meeting with the police’s Western Cape provincial management and community policing forum (CPF) representatives at the premier’s office.

Shortly afterwards, the deputy minister of police, Cassel Mathale, and the national commissioner of police, Gen Khehla Sitole, presented Matakata to the premier of the Western Cape, Alan Winde, and MEC for community safety, Albert Fritz.

Addressing the media after these two engagements, Matakata outlined a new vision for policing in the province.

High up on her list of priorities is the building of cohesion within the police’s Western Cape management team thereby ensuring police officers are accountable and responsive to community needs. That, in her view, will guarantee quality service delivery.

She acknowledged that policing the province is no mean feat, but, with all role players on board, she and her management team were set on stamping the authority of the state.

During her tenure, the capacitation of police stations as the first line of defence in dealing with serious violent crimes will be intensified. In essence, human and physical resources will be distributed to where the needs are.

Policing will also be supported by an effective detection service that will investigate and solve reported cases.

In a bid to ensure all citizens of the Western Cape are and feel safe, an effective intelligence capacity will underpin all policing efforts. “I have been keeping an eye on the issue of crime in this province, including crimes against women and children plaguing certain communities. An aggressive response, that involves all stakeholders, is required. Also, the main generators of serious violent crimes, namely drugs, alcohol and illegal firearms, are what we will be focussing on,” Matakata says.

In her view, boots on the ground are key in addressing crime, but dealing with socio-economic factors that impede policing initiatives remains crucial.

Matakata appealed for support and commitment from all stakeholders.

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