Voluntary reservists needed in Cape

2020-02-13 06:02
Moeridah Dien (centre) at her farewell as a police reservist, with Steenberg CPF’s Beryl Cerff (left) and CPF chair, Gavin Walbrugh (right). PHOTO: Racine Edwardes

Moeridah Dien (centre) at her farewell as a police reservist, with Steenberg CPF’s Beryl Cerff (left) and CPF chair, Gavin Walbrugh (right). PHOTO: Racine Edwardes

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The police have opened applications for reservists across the country.

In the Western Cape, the police are looking for 904 voluntary reservists, with most of the roles intended for Mitchell’s Plain (52), Khayelitsha (45), Nyanga (43), Mfuleni (38), Cape Town (32), Philippi East (26) and Steenberg (21).

A retired reservist of Steenberg police station, Moeridah Dien, says her 12 years in the role exposed her to many things – both good and bad – but all equipped her to do her job as best as she could.

“I have been with the police for over 20 years, but as a reservist – 12 years,” she says. “I had always done trauma counselling but being a reservist took me to another level. It broadened my knowledge so much. It was an awesome journey but it’s what you make of it.”

There are two categories in which a reservist can serve: functional policing and specialised operational support.

The role of the former requires duties be completed at a community safety centre where reservists are able to do admin duties such as opening dockets.

Reservists in the specialised operational support category use their expertise to assist police operations.

Dien adds: “Reservists get to wear full uniform. They have all the responsibility that a normal police officer has.”

Potential reservists must meet the following requirements. They should:

. Be born in South Africa;

. be at least 25, but under 40;

. complete a health questionnaire, at his or her own cost, which is confirmed by a registered medical practitioner;

. be medically, mentally and physically fit to perform duties;

. be of good and sound character;

. fit the psychometric profile and must successfully complete any other test that may be determined by the national police commissioner;

. be in possession of at least a senior certificate (Grade 12) or must have successfully completed a SAQA accredited NQF level 4 qualification;

. be able to speak, read and write at least two official languages, of which one must be English;

. be employed and provide proof of employment;

. provide proof of residential address;

. be someone without a criminal record or any criminal or departmental cases pending against him or her (all criminal or departmental cases must be declared); and

. be someone who does not have a tattoo which will be visible if the person wears a uniform.V Head to your nearest police station to apply. Applications close on Friday 28 February.

The South African Police Services (SAPS) have opened applications for reservists across the country.

In the Western Cape, the police are looking for 904 voluntary reservists, with most of the roles intended for Mitchell’s Plain (52), Khayelitsha (45), Nyanga (43), Mfuleni (38), Cape Town (32), Philippi East (26) and Steenberg (21).

A retired reservist of Steenberg police station, Moeridah Dien, says her 12 years in the role exposed her to many things – both good and bad – but all equipped her to do her job as best as she could.

“I have been with the police for over 20 years, but as a reservist – 12 years,” she says. “I had always done trauma counselling but being a reservist took me to another level. It broadened my knowledge so much. It was an awesome journey but it’s what you make of it.”

There are two categories in which a reservist can serve: functional policing and specialised operational support. The role of the former requires duties be completed at a community safety centre where reservists are able to do admin duties such as opening dockets. Reservists in the specialised operational support category use their expertise to assist police operations.

Dien adds: “Reservists get to wear full uniform. They have all the responsibility that a normal police officer has.”

Potential reservists must meet the following requirements. They should:

. Be born in South Africa;

. be at least 25, but under 40;

. complete a health questionnaire, at his or her own cost, which is confirmed by a registered medical practitioner;

. be medically, mentally and physically fit to perform duties;

. be of good and sound character;

. fit the psychometric profile and must successfully complete any other test that may be determined by the national police commissioner;

. be in possession of at least a senior certificate (Grade 12) or must have successfully completed a SAQA accredited NQF level 4 qualification;

. be able to speak, read and write at least two official languages, of which one must be English;

. be employed and provide proof of employment;

. provide proof of residential address;

. be someone without a criminal record or any criminal or departmental cases pending against him or her (all criminal or departmental cases must be declared); and

. be someone who does not have a tattoo which will be visible if the person wears a uniform.V Head to your nearest police station to apply. Applications close on Friday 28 February.

The South African Police Services (SAPS) have opened applications for reservists across the country.

In the Western Cape, the police are looking for 904 voluntary reservists, with most of the roles intended for Mitchell’s Plain (52), Khayelitsha (45), Nyanga (43), Mfuleni (38), Cape Town (32), Philippi East (26) and Steenberg (21).

A retired reservist of Steenberg police station, Moeridah Dien, says her 12 years in the role exposed her to many things – both good and bad – but all equipped her to do her job as best as she could.

“I have been with the police for over 20 years, but as a reservist – 12 years,” she says.

“I had always done trauma counselling but being a reservist took me to another level. It broadened my knowledge so much. It was an awesome journey but it’s what you make of it.”

There are two categories in which a reservist can serve: functional policing and specialised operational support.

The role of the former requires duties be completed at a community safety centre where reservists are able to do admin duties such as opening dockets.

Reservists in the specialised operational support category use their expertise to assist police operations.

Dien adds: “Reservists get to wear full uniform. They have all the responsibility that a normal police officer has.”

Potential reservists must meet the following requirements. They should:

. Be born in South Africa;

. be at least 25, but under 40;

. complete a health questionnaire, at his or her own cost, which is confirmed by a registered medical practitioner;

. be medically, mentally and physically fit to perform duties;

. be of good and sound character;

. fit the psychometric profile and must successfully complete any other test that may be determined by the national police commissioner;

. be in possession of at least a senior certificate (Grade 12) or must have successfully completed a SAQA accredited NQF level 4 qualification;

. be able to speak, read and write at least two official languages, of which one must be English;

. be employed and provide proof of employment;

. provide proof of residential address;

. be someone without a criminal record or any criminal or departmental cases pending against him or her (all criminal or departmental cases must be declared); and

. be someone who does not have a tattoo which will be visible if the person wears a uniform.

Applicants will be screened and must complete a questionnaire before they are given the position and sworn in under oath.V Head to your nearest police station to apply. Applications close on Friday 28 February.

The South African Police Services (SAPS) have opened applications for reservists across the country.

In the Western Cape, the police are looking for 904 voluntary reservists, with most of the roles intended for Mitchell’s Plain (52), Khayelitsha (45), Nyanga (43), Mfuleni (38), Cape Town (32), Philippi East (26) and Steenberg (21).

A retired reservist of Steenberg police station, Moeridah Dien, says her 12 years in the role exposed her to many things – both good and bad – but all equipped her to do her job as best as she could.

“I have been with the police for over 20 years, but as a reservist – 12 years,” she says. “I had always done trauma counselling but being a reservist took me to another level. It broadened my knowledge so much. It was an awesome journey but it’s what you make of it.”

There are two categories in which a reservist can serve: functional policing and specialised operational support. The role of the former requires duties be completed at a community safety centre where reservists are able to do admin duties such as opening dockets. Reservists in the specialised operational support category use their expertise to assist police operations.

Dien adds: “Reservists get to wear full uniform. They have all the responsibility that a normal police officer has.”

Potential reservists must meet the following requirements. They should:

. Be born in South Africa;

. be at least 25, but under 40;

. complete a health questionnaire, at his or her own cost, which is confirmed by a registered medical practitioner;

. be medically, mentally and physically fit to perform duties;

. be of good and sound character;

. fit the psychometric profile and must successfully complete any other test that may be determined by the national police commissioner;

. be in possession of at least a senior certificate (Grade 12) or must have successfully completed a SAQA accredited NQF level 4 qualification;

. be able to speak, read and write at least two official languages, of which one must be English;

. be employed and provide proof of employment;

. provide proof of residential address;

. be someone without a criminal record or any criminal or departmental cases pending against them (all criminal or departmental cases must be declared); and

. be someone who does not have a tattoo which will be visible if the person wears a uniform.V Head to your nearest police station to apply. Applications close on Friday 28 February.

The South African Police Services (SAPS) have opened applications for reservists across the country.

In the Western Cape, the police are looking for 904 voluntary reservists, with most of the roles intended for Mitchell’s Plain (52), Khayelitsha (45), Nyanga (43), Mfuleni (38), Cape Town (32), Philippi East (26) and Steenberg (21).

A retired reservist of Steenberg police station, Moeridah Dien, says her 12 years in the role exposed her to many things – both good and bad – but all equipped her to do her job as best as she could.

“I have been with the police for over 20 years, but as a reservist – 12 years,” she says. “I had always done trauma counselling but being a reservist took me to another level. It broadened my knowledge so much. It was an awesome journey but it’s what you make of it.”

There are two categories in which a reservist can serve: functional policing and specialised operational support. The role of the former requires duties be completed at a community safety centre where reservists are able to do admin duties such as opening dockets. Reservists in the specialised operational support category use their expertise to assist police operations. Dien adds: “Reservists get to wear full uniform. They have all the responsibility that a normal police officer has.”

Potential reservists must meet the following requirements. They should:

. Be born in South Africa;

. be at least 25, but under 40;

. complete a health questionnaire, at his or her own cost, which is confirmed by a registered medical practitioner;

. be medically, mentally and physically fit to perform duties;

. be of good and sound character;

. fit the psychometric profile and must successfully complete any other test that may be determined by the national police commissioner;

. be in possession of at least a senior certificate (Grade 12) or must have successfully completed a SAQA accredited NQF level 4 qualification;

. be able to speak, read and write at least two official languages, of which one must be English;

. be employed and provide proof of employment;

. provide proof of residential address;

. be someone without a criminal record or any criminal or departmental cases pending against him or her (all criminal or departmental cases must be declared); and

. be someone who does not have a tattoo which will be visible if the person wears a uniform.V Head to your nearest police station to apply. Applications close on Friday 28 February.

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