Want not, waste not, crop is food

2018-07-05 06:00
The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus vegetables from commercial farmers and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus vegetables from commercial farmers and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

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According to estimates, about 10 million tonnes of food produced in South Africa is not consumed.

This is from The Second Harvest programme which sources and collects surplus fruit and vegetables from commercial farmers across the country, and, in turn, redistributes the fresh produce to 600 beneficiary organisations­.

At the same time, it has been established that over a quarter of South Africans go around in empty stomachs.

A new project, launched by a Gardens-based NGO Last week, aims to link these two problems and find a single solution.

Called FoodForward and founded in 2009 to address widespread poverty levels, it connects a world of excess to a world of need by recovering the surplus produce from the consumer goods supply chain.

As a result, the organisation now reaches up to 250 000 on a daily basis at a cost of R0.79 per meal. Beneficiary organisations include orphanages, places of safety, creches, disability care, aged care, skills and youth development­.

The Second Harvest allows farmers to donate surplus crops generated during harvest-time.

This ensures that the crops are not discarded for lack of want.

Andy du Plessis, Managing Director at FoodForward SA said: “[Around half of] edible agricultural production is wasted due to specification requirements, cold-chain and processing inadequacies as well as access to markets, explains Du Plessis.

“All this edible, nutritious food is wasted while 14 million South Africans go hungry every day,” he says.

The Second Harvest programme uses a method called Foodbanking, which involves sourcing, collection, sorting, and distribution of edible, within-date surplus food donated from supply chain partners, for distribution to registered NPOs that provide community based feeding programmes.

“Foodbanking is the most effective solution to reduce hunger, and reducing food waste is the third most effective solution fighting climate change.

“The agricultural surplus farmers donate to us surplus that would otherwise be going to waste. This is donated to us instead of ploughing it back into the earth or going to landfill. That is why our model is so cost effective­.

“A number of factors account for this surplus food going to waste, including supply chain weaknesses; urbanisation; and a growing demand for food, particularly processed foods.

“As more food is produced, more food is either lost or wasted. This staggering food loss and waste occurs mostly in the agricultural and post-harvest stages and to a lesser degree in the processing, packaging and distribution stages.

“When one includes the resources used to produce the food (water, energy, and disposal costs) to this lost or wasted food, it seems unthinkable that such a paradox exists in the South African context,” Du Plessis concluded­.

An estimated 10 million tonnes of food produced in South Africa is not consumed. At the same time, over a quarter of all South Africans are going hungry. A new project, launched by Gardens-based Food Forward SA last week, looks to link these two problems with one solution.

The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus fruit and vegetables from commercial farmers across South Africa and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

Established in 2009 to address widespread hunger in South Africa, FoodForward SA connects a world of excess to a world of need by recovering surplus food from the consumer goods supply chain. The organisation reaches up to 250 000 daily at the cost of R0.79 per meal. Beneficiary organisations include orphanages, places of safety, creches, disability care, aged care, skills and youth development. The Second Harvest allows farmers to donate their post-harvest surpluses while they are harvesting, to ensure the food does not go to waste.

[Around half of] edible agricultural production is wasted due to specification requirements, cold-chain and processing inadequacies as well as access to markets, explains FoodForward SA managing director, Andy du Plessis.

“All this edible, nutritious food is wasted while 14 million South Africans go hungry every day,” he says.

The Second Harvest programme uses a method called Foodbanking. It involves sourcing edible, within-date surplus food donated from supply chain partners, for distribution to registered NPOs that provide community based feeding programmes.

“Foodbanking is the most effective solution to reduce hunger, and reducing food waste is the third most effective solution fighting climate change. The agricultural surplus farmers donate to us is surplus that would otherwise be going to waste. This is donated to us instead of ploughing it back into the earth or going to landfill. That is why our model is so cost effective.

“A number of factors account for this surplus food going to waste. As more food is produced, so more food is either lost or wasted. This staggering food loss and waste occurs mostly in the agricultural and post-harvest stages and to a lesser degree in the processing, packaging and distribution stages.

“ When one includes the resources used to produce the food (water, energy, and disposal costs) to this lost or wasted food, it seems unthinkable that such a paradox exists in the South African context. These wasted resources have a negative impact on our already weak economy.”

Around one third of food produced in South Africa goes to landfills, explains Du Plessis.

“When one also factors in the positive environmental impact of food not being dumped in landfills, there is no question that this model should be further explored as a viable cost effective solution to address food insecurity.

“An independent analysis of the greenhouse gas emissions savings of FoodForward SA’s Foodbanking model conducted by WWF and Greenhouse reflect a total saving of 17 600 tonnes, which is equivalent to 3700 passenger vehicles being driven every day for a year, or the annual electricity usage of 6000 South African households,” he says.

An estimated 10 million tonnes of food produced in South Africa is not consumed. At the same time, over a quarter of all South Africans are going hungry. A new project, launched by Gardens-based Food Forward SA last week, looks to link these two problems with one solution.

The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus fruit and vegetables from commercial farmers across South Africa and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

Established in 2009 to address widespread hunger in South Africa, FoodForward SA connects a world of excess to a world of need by recovering surplus food from the consumer goods supply chain.

The organisation reaches up to 250 000 daily at the cost of R0.79 per meal. Beneficiary organisations include orphanages, places of safety, creches, disability care, aged care, skills and youth development. The Second Harvest allows farmers to donate their post-harvest surpluses while they are harvesting, to ensure the food does not go to waste.

[Around half of] edible agricultural production is wasted due to specification requirements, cold-chain and processing inadequacies as well as access to markets, explains FoodForward SA managing director, Andy du Plessis.

“All this edible, nutritious food is wasted while 14 million South Africans go hungry every day,” he says.

The Second Harvest programme uses a method called Foodbanking. It involves sourcing, collection, sorting, and distribution of edible, within-date surplus food donated from supply chain partners, for distribution to registered NPOs that provide community based feeding programmes.

“Foodbanking is the most effective solution to reduce hunger, and reducing food waste is the third most effective solution fighting climate change. The agricultural surplus farmers donate to us is surplus that would otherwise be going to waste. This is donated to us instead of ploughing it back into the earth or going to landfill. That is why our model is so cost effective.

“A number of factors account for this surplus food going to waste.

“As more food is produced, so more food is either lost or wasted. This staggering food loss and waste occurs mostly in the agricultural and post-harvest stages and to a lesser degree in the processing, packaging and distribution stages.

“When one includes the resources used to produce the food (water, energy, and disposal costs) to this lost or wasted food, it seems unthinkable that such a paradox exists in the South African context. These wasted resources have a negative impact on our already weak economy.”

Around one third of food produced in South Africa goes to landfills, explains Du Plessis.

“When one also factors in the positive environmental impact of food not being dumped in landfills, there is no question that this model should be further explored as a viable cost effective solution to address food insecurity. An independent analysis of the greenhouse gas emissions savings of FoodForward SA’s Foodbanking model conducted by WWF and Greenhouse reflect a total saving of 17 600 tonnes, which is equivalent to 3700 passenger vehicles being driven every day for a year, or the annual electricity usage of 6000 South African households,” he says.

“Given the enormous impact of implementing the Foodbanking model at scale, there is definitely a case to be made for how edible surplus food should be considered as another alternative to address the food insecurity burden across South Africa.”

An estimated 10 million tonnes of food produced in South Africa is not consumed. At the same time, over a quarter of all South Africans are going hungry. A new project, launched by Gardens-based Food Forward SA last week, looks to link these two problems with one solution­.

The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus fruit and vegetables from commercial farmers across South Africa and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

Established in 2009 to address widespread hunger in South Africa, FoodForward SA connects a world of excess to a world of need by recovering surplus food from the consumer goods supply chain. The organisation reaches up to 250 000 daily at the cost of R0.79 per meal. Beneficiary organisations include orphanages, places of safety, creches, disability care, aged care, skills and youth development. The Second Harvest allows farmers to donate their post-harvest surpluses while they are harvesting, to ensure the food does not go to waste.

[Around half of] edible agricultural production is wasted due to specification requirements, cold-chain and processing inadequacies as well as access to markets, explains FoodForward SA managing director, Andy du Plessis.

“All this edible, nutritious food is wasted while 14 million South Africans go hungry every day.”

The Second Harvest programme uses a method called Foodbanking. It involves sourcing, collection, sorting, and distribution of edible, within-date surplus food donated from supply chain partners, for distribution to registered NPOs that provide community based feeding programmes.

“Foodbanking is the most effective solution to reduce hunger, and reducing food waste is the third most effective solution fighting climate change. The agricultural surplus farmers donate to us is surplus that would otherwise be going to waste. This is donated to us instead of ploughing it back into the earth or going to landfill. That is why our model is so cost effective.

“A number of factors account for this surplus food going to waste, including supply chain weaknesses; urbanisation; and a growing demand for food, particularly processed foods.

“As more food is produced, so more food is either lost or wasted. This staggering food loss and waste occurs mostly in the agricultural and post-harvest stages and to a lesser degree in the processing, packaging and distribution stages.

“When one includes the resources used to produce the food (water, energy, and disposal costs) to this lost or wasted food, it seems unthinkable that such a paradox exists in the South African context. These wasted resources have a negative impact on our already weak economy.”

Around one third of food produced in South Africa goes to landfills, explains Du Plessis.

“When one also factors in the positive environmental impact of food not being dumped in landfills, there is no question that this model should be further explored as a viable cost effective solution to address food insecurity. An independent analysis of the greenhouse gas emissions savings of FoodForward SA’s Foodbanking model conducted by WWF and Greenhouse reflect a total saving of 17 600 tonnes, which is equivalent to 3700 passenger vehicles being driven every day for a year, or the annual electricity usage of 6000 South African households,” he says.

“Given the enormous impact of implementing the Foodbanking model at scale, there is definitely a case to be made for how edible surplus food should be considered as another alternative to address the food insecurity burden across South Africa.”

An estimated 10 million tonnes of food produced in South Africa is not consumed. At the same time, over a quarter of all South Africans are going hungry. A new project, launched by Gardens-based Food Forward SA last week, looks to link these two problems with one solution­.

The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus fruit and vegetables from commercial farmers across South Africa and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

Established in 2009 to address widespread hunger in South Africa, FoodForward SA connects a world of excess to a world of need by recovering surplus food from the consumer goods supply chain. The organisation reaches up to 250 000 daily at the cost of R0.79 per meal. Beneficiary organisations include orphanages, places of safety, creches, disability care, aged care, skills and youth development. The Second Harvest allows farmers to donate their post-harvest surpluses while they are harvesting, to ensure the food does not go to waste.

[Around half of] edible agricultural production is wasted due to specification requirements, cold-chain and processing inadequacies as well as access to markets, explains FoodForward SA managing director, Andy du Plessis.

“All this edible, nutritious food is wasted while 14 million South Africans go hungry every day,” he says.

The Second Harvest programme uses a method called Foodbanking. It involves sourcing, collection, sorting, and distribution of edible, within-date surplus food donated from supply chain partners, for distribution to registered NPOs that provide community based feeding programmes.

“Foodbanking is the most effective solution to reduce hunger, and reducing food waste is the third most effective solution fighting climate change. The agricultural surplus farmers donate to us is surplus that would otherwise be going to waste. This is donated to us instead of ploughing it back into the earth or going to landfill. That is why our model is so cost effective.

“A number of factors account for this surplus food going to waste.

“As more food is produced, so more food is either lost or wasted. This staggering food loss and waste occurs mostly in the agricultural and post-harvest stages and to a lesser degree in the processing, packaging and distribution stages.

“When one includes the resources used to produce the food (water, energy, and disposal costs) to this lost or wasted food, it seems unthinkable that such a paradox exists in the South African context. These wasted resources have a negative impact on our already weak economy.”

Around one third of food produced in South Africa goes to landfills, explains Du Plessis.

“When one also factors in the positive environmental impact of food not being dumped in landfills, there is no question that this model should be further explored as a viable cost effective solution to address food insecurity. An independent analysis of the greenhouse gas emissions savings of FoodForward SA’s Foodbanking model conducted by WWF and Greenhouse reflect a total saving of 17 600 tonnes, which is equivalent to 3700 passenger vehicles being driven every day for a year, or the annual electricity usage of 6000 South African households,” he says.

An estimated 10 million tonnes of food produced in South Africa is not consumed. At the same time, over a quarter of all South Africans are going hungry.

A new project, launched by Gardens-based Food Forward SA last week, looks to link these two problems with one solution.

The Second Harvest programme sources and collects surplus fruit and vegetables from commercial farmers across South Africa and redistributes this fresh produce to the 600 beneficiary organisations in FoodForward’s network.

Established in 2009 to address widespread hunger in South Africa, FoodForward SA connects a world of excess to a world of need by recovering surplus food from the consumer goods supply chain. The organisation reaches up to 250 000 daily at the cost of R0.79 per meal. Beneficiary organisations include orphanages, places of safety, creches, disability care, aged care, skills and youth development.

The Second Harvest allows farmers to donate their post-harvest surpluses while they are harvesting, to ensure the food does not go to waste.

[Around half of] edible agricultural production is wasted due to specification requirements, cold-chain and processing inadequacies as well as access to markets, explains FoodForward SA managing director, Andy du Plessis.

“All this edible, nutritious food is wasted while 14 million South Africans go hungry every day,” he says.

The Second Harvest programme uses a method called Foodbanking. It involves sourcing, collection, sorting, and distribution of edible, within-date surplus food donated from supply chain partners, for distribution to registered NPOs that provide community based feeding programmes.

“Foodbanking is the most effective solution to reduce hunger, and reducing food waste is the third most effective solution fighting climate change. The agricultural surplus farmers donate to us is surplus that would otherwise be going to waste. This is donated to us instead of ploughing it back into the earth or going to landfill. That is why our model is so cost effective.

“A number of factors account for this surplus food going to waste, including supply chain weaknesses; urbanisation; and a growing demand for food, particularly processed foods.

“As more food is produced, so more food is either lost or wasted. This staggering food loss and waste occurs mostly in the agricultural and post-harvest stages and to a lesser degree in the processing, packaging and distribution stages.

“When one includes the resources used to produce the food (water, energy, and disposal costs) to this lost or wasted food, it seems unthinkable that such a paradox exists in the South African context. These wasted resources have a negative impact on our already weak economy.”

Around one third of food produced in South Africa goes to landfills, explains Du Plessis.

“When one also factors in the positive environmental impact of food not being dumped in landfills, there is no question that this model should be further explored as a viable cost effective solution to address food insecurity. An independent analysis of the greenhouse gas emissions savings of FoodForward SA’s Foodbanking model conducted by WWF and Greenhouse reflect a total saving of 17 600 tonnes, which is equivalent to 3700 passenger vehicles being driven every day for a year, or the annual electricity usage of 6000 South African households,” he says.

“Given the enormous impact of implementing the Foodbanking model at scale, there is definitely a case to be made for how edible surplus food should be considered as another alternative to address the food insecurity burden across South Africa.”

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