Water quality stalls output

2018-05-31 06:02

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by sub-council 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.

The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts. This is a normal process though and it has been completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May. The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan. This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.”

“These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty. To get through the current drought, however, it remains essential that we reduce our water usage.”

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.

The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts. This is a normal process though and it has been completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May. The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan. This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.”

“These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty. To get through the current drought, however, it remains essential that we reduce our water usage and manage the water that we have left in our supply system through the City’s pressure management programmes and our continued emphasis on fixing leaks to reduce water losses.”

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.

The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts. This is a normal process though and it has been
completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May. The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers.It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan.

“This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty. To get through the current drought, however, it remains essential that we reduce our water usage and manage the water that we have left in our supply system through the City’s pressure management programmes and our continued emphasis on fixing leaks to reduce water losses.”

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.

The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts. This is a normal process though and it has been
completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May. The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan.

“This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty,” he says.

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks. This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.

The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts.

“This is a normal process though and it has been completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May.

The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan. This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.”

“These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty­.

“To get through the current drought, however, it remains essential that we reduce our water usage and manage the water that we have left in our supply system through the City’s pressure management programmes and our continued emphasis on fixing leaks to reduce water losses.”

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.

The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts. This is a normal process though and it has been
completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May. The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan. This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty. To get through the current drought, however, it remains essential that we reduce our water usage and manage the water that we have left in our supply system through the City’s pressure management programmes and our continued emphasis on fixing leaks to reduce water losses.”

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March. The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts. This is a normal process though and it has been completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May. The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well, with first water expected to be delivered by June and full production to be reached by July, if all goes according to plan. This plant is also set to produce seven million litres per day.”

“These projects provide only a small contribution of our daily water requirement as a city,” Neilson says.

“The desalination projects, in conjunction with our groundwater and water re-use programmes, are part of our efforts to make our city more resilient to future drought shocks and to ensure that we thrive despite climatic uncertainty. To get through the current drought, however, it remains essential that we reduce our water usage and manage the water that we have left in our supply system through the City’s pressure management programmes and our continued emphasis on fixing leaks to reduce water losses.”

The V&A Waterfront desalination plant is expected to come online in the next few weeks.

This was stated by subcouncil 16 chairperson, Matthew Kempthorne, at a recent ratepayers’ meeting.

The waterfront desalination plant was originally expected to start producing water in March.The City of Cape Town then stated the plant would be ready in April or May, but it was delayed due to “water quality issues”, Kempthorne says.

This was confirmed by staff at the City’s media office, who said “there were slight delays to ensure that the water quality is within the SANS prescripts.

This is a normal process though and it has been completed.”

On Monday last week, deputy mayor Ian Neilson visited the temporary desalination plant in Strandfontein, which is now delivering high-quality, treated desalinated water into the supply system.

The Strandfontein plant was initially expected to supply its first water in March, with the full completion in May.

The City’s third temporary desalination plant at Monwabisi was expected to reach full production in May.

This plant is injecting almost five million litres per day into the reticulation system and the water is being delivered to customers. It is foreseen that full production of seven million litres will come online during June, he says.

“Our reverse osmosis desalination plant in the Waterfront area is close to producing two million litres of drinking water per day, while progress on the desalination plant at Monwabisi is also progressing well,” Neilson says.

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