WCCPA pays tribute to a medical pioneer

2019-06-27 06:01
Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross and Noor Osman, WCCPA chairperson, unveiling the plaque honouring founder of the Cerebral Palsy Clinic.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross and Noor Osman, WCCPA chairperson, unveiling the plaque honouring founder of the Cerebral Palsy Clinic.

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The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching.

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally.

Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure. Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching.

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally.

Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital.

The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching. Decades of hardwork

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally. Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital.

The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching. Decades of hardwork

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally. Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching.

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally.

Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic.

The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching.

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally.

Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching.

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally.

Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

The Western Cape Cerebral Palsy Association (WCCPA) unveiled a commemorative plaque in honour of Doctor Leila Arens at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. The ceremony took place in Rondebosch on Wednesday 12 June.

Arens spent most of her professional career as a physician, studying and caring for children with Cerebral Palsy, a developmental disorder of a child’s brain which results in difficulty of movement affecting daily activities such as walking, sitting, eating and drinking. The condition is lifelong with no cure.

Arens published many studies on these topics and pioneered several novel therapies designed to improve the quality of life of the children she treated. She taught many generations of medical students and was known for her excellent teaching.

In 1968 Arens, with Doctor Gladys Beinhart, started the WCCPA Cerebral Palsy Clinic at Red Cross, at a time when Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology was in its infancy internationally.

Over the past 50 years, thousands of children with cerebral palsy were recipients of specialist rehabilitative therapies provided at the clinic. The clinic continues to provide 300 rehabilitative physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy sessions a month that aim to improve both the functional ability and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy.

Doctor Anita Parbhoo, medical manager at Red Cross, says: “Collaborating with WCCPA therapists in a multidisciplinary clinic to treat cerebral palsy patients has provided a holistic patient-centred service for these patients”.

Arens passed away on 8 July 2018 in Minnesota in the United States of America (USA) where she emigrated to in 2001 to join her children.

A statement read: “The WCCPA, Western Cape Government Health and the Red Cross Hospital will forever be grateful to this pioneer and visionary for her dedication to the treatment and care of children with cerebral palsy.’’

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