What’s next after matric results?

2019-01-17 06:02
Mariska Pienaar

Mariska Pienaar

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With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents alearners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects. It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities. It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects. A matric year in its whole can also be repeated at the learner’s current school.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities. It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in.

Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few.

A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects. It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.

In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful. Many options are available for learners who did not obtain the desired results in their original matric exams. Current matric results are not set in stone, and neither do current matric results serve to cast a learner’s future path in stone.V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education.

It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.

It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects. A matric year in its whole can also be repeated at the learner’s current school.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities. It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects.

It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.

In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful. Many options are available for learners who did not obtain the desired results in their original matric exams. Current matric results are not set in stone, and neither do current matric results serve to cast a learner’s future path in stone.V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects. A matric year in its whole can also be repeated at the learner’s current school.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities. It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects. It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.

In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful. Many options are available for learners who did not obtain the desired results in their original matric exams. Current matric results are not set in stone, and neither do current matric results serve to cast a learner’s future path in stone.V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects. It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects. It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects. A matric year in its whole can also be repeated at the learner’s current school.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.

It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects.

It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful. Many options are available for learners who did not obtain the desired results in their original matric exams. Current matric results are not set in stone, and neither do current matric results serve to cast a learner’s future path in stone.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study. Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals. The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects.

It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year.

Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

With the new academic year in full swing and with some learners caught between the rock and a hard place about their next move, University of the Western Cape lecturer and counselling psychologist Mariska Pienaar answers some crucial questions to help the 2018 matric class.

What advice can be given to parents and learners at this time?

The most fundamental advice is for parents and learners to realise that there is nothing about the results from this round of matric examinations that signifies the end of the road for any learner. It is easy to develop a kind of “tunnel vision” around matric results and the implications thereof for the learner’s immediate future. Should learners not have achieved the desired outcomes with their matric examinations, however, there are many options open to them to still reach their goals, albeit perhaps in some cases with somewhat of a detour. This realisation should alleviate some of the anxiety around matric results.

If learners are unsuccessful, what can they do?

“Success” is a relative term which would have different meanings for different learners and their parents. For some it might mean that they did not pass matric. For others it might mean that they did not achieve the results that are required for entry into a specific programme at a specific tertiary institution. The options that follow however apply to both scenarios. One option is to register for supplementary matric exams, which may be written if a learner has failed a maximum of two subjects, if they couldn’t write the original exam due to illness, or if they couldn’t write the exam due to death in the family. Taking supplementary examinations not only provides the learner with the opportunity to pass previously failed subjects, but also the chance to improve their marks to such an extent that they may qualify for the courses they originally wish to study.

Learners considering this option should contact the Department of Education for information and guidelines. Students taking this option can also join the so-called Second Chance Programme which offers free educational support to scholars who wish to rewrite a maximum of two subjects.

What should parents do?

Parents may understandably be disappointed and anxious if their child did not achieve the desired outcomes in their matric exams. After all, they invested in their child’s future and want the best opportunities for them. Parents should however attempt to focus on remaining supportive and encouraging of their child. Parents should arm themselves with information around alternative routes to achieving the child’s original goals.

The central message should be that whatever happened, it is not the end of the road, and armed with the correct information. Parents and their child should work collaboratively to explore viable options that would enable the facilitation of meeting the parents’ and child’s goals.

If matriculants did not pass with university entrance, what other options are there for them?

All of the above-mentioned options of pursuing supplementary examinations and joining the Second Chance Programme, or repeating matric, are possibilities for learners who are adamant about obtaining university entrance. It should however be noted that despite popular opinion, a university degree is not necessarily the be all and end all of tertiary education. It is not necessarily always the case that a university degree versus, say, a university of technology diploma or a college certificate, would provide better career opportunities.It really depends on the field of study the prospective student is interested in. Colleges provide a variety of courses – some of which do not even require a matric qualification – including computer courses, child day care courses, beauty therapy courses, engineering studies and technical courses, to name but a few. A learner may also consider taking short courses or bridging courses, even while preparing to rewrite specific matric subjects. It is important for the learner to stay occupied and continue with self-development in the year following their original matric year. Consider doing supplementary courses which would strengthen your skills in a particular area and possibly advance your chances of gaining entry into the institution of your choice at a later stage. Consider getting involved in voluntary work, again preferably in the area of study you wish to pursue.In conclusion, students and parents are encouraged to remain hopeful.

V Mariska Pienaar is a counselling psychologist and lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Psychology.

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