Centre to host intervention to raise dyslexia awareness

2019-10-16 06:00
Indumiso Tutoring Centre wants to educate communities about dyslexia in children.PHOTO: SUPPLIED

Indumiso Tutoring Centre wants to educate communities about dyslexia in children.PHOTO: SUPPLIED

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INDUMISO Tutoring Centre will host an intervention on October 26 at Alston Primary in an attempt to raise awareness and create an understanding of dyslexia in the community.

October is Dyslexia Awareness Month, which was created by The International Dyslexia Association.

The centre’s intervention is aimed at developing ongoing communication with teachers, parents and therapists in order to build a strong foundation for dyslexic pupils.

According to Bheki Gwebu of Indumiso, the centre, which works with pupils with learning difficulties, has identified a lack of understanding regarding learning difficulties in parents and teachers.

He said the centre caters for pupils who experience specific learning difficulties which prevent them from achieving success in mainstream schools.

“We believe that together we can create a future for all individuals who struggle with dyslexia and other related learning differences so that they may have more access to the tools and resources they need,” said Gwebu.

In speaking about their work, Gwebu said most parents are in denial and cannot accept that their children are suffering from learning difficulties.

“In the uMgungundlovu District, a child born with a learning difficulty is destined for a life of dependency.

These pupils tend to be a social and financial burden to their families.

Unfortunately, they do not get the appropriate support they need due to a lack of knowledge and skills from their families and communities,” said Gwebu, who added that a majority of parents in the district are not fully literate and, as a result, they are unable to assist their children with homework or even encourage them to read.

Furthermore, he said: “Children with learning difficulties who do get enrolled in mainstream schools are often ‘neglected’ with no possibility [of being able to] learn at their own pace.

“When peers at school notice their differences, criticism, discrimination and disagreements take place.

This usually results in poor social judgment, behavioural problems, school failure, drop-outs, drug abuse, and crime.”

Gwebu encouraged parents to attend the event because it will help them address issues such as how to identify a learner with dyslexia; what is dyslexia; what causes dyslexia; how to work with a dyslexic child; and inform them about what support is available for dyslexic children.

Gwebu stressed that the aim of the centre is to pay attention to each pupil’s physical, intellectual, social, emotional and academic profile, nurturing their strengths and guiding them to use strategies to overcome areas of weakness.

The event will start from 9 am and will host Dyslexia SA as the main speaker with an occupational therapist, educational psychologist, speech therapist, dietician, homeopath, and more set to attend the event.

“We believe that together we can create a future for all individuals who struggle with dyslexia and other related learning differences so that they may have more access to the tools and resources they need,” said Bheki Gwebu of the Indumiso Tutoring Centre, who will host the intervention this October.

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