Plans to transform suburb Plans to transform area

2015-08-04 06:00
A plan to transform spaces in Manenberg includes renovations and upgrades to schools. During a statement made by the Premier Helen Zille and Mayor Patricia de Lille they say Manenberg has been indentified as a priority area for upliftment by the prov

A plan to transform spaces in Manenberg includes renovations and upgrades to schools. During a statement made by the Premier Helen Zille and Mayor Patricia de Lille they say Manenberg has been indentified as a priority area for upliftment by the prov

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

The City of Cape Town and the Western Cape government have unveiled bold plans to transform Manenberg to uplift the community.

According to a statement by Western Cape premier Helen Zille and mayor Patricia de Lille, Manenberg has been indentified as a priority area for upliftment by the province and the City due to “how deeply and tragically this suburb is affected by urban decay and the resulting crises of drug abuse and gangsterism”.

“The focus will be on advancing safety, edu­cation, healthcare, technology and innovation, while promoting social cohesion and the development of small business opportunities.

“We believe this vision can only be achieved through building social cohesion, participatory planning and partnerships. These are the non-negotiables for successful urban infrastructure development,” they say.

The objective of the transformation is to “improve the quality of life of citizens”.

“Over the past months, the province and City have been involved in an extensive community engagement process in Manenberg and have compiled a community action plan and a public investment framework. The violence prevention through urban upgrading project has been driving this pro­cess.

“The vision of the people of Manenberg has been central to these plans. Residents want to see Manenberg go from a dormitory area to a safe, secure, diverse, vibrant, innovative, attractive, cohesive and sustainable neighbourhood,” De Lille says.

A committee was set up, comprising of community stakeholders from the area, such as youth organisations, NGOs, community-based organisations and the Community Police Forum. Ward committees took part at specific stages as well.

A two-day workshop was held at the end of February to discuss the framework, with at least five sessions around interactive visioning that included large-scale maps with ideas by local leaders being visualised.

“Walk-abouts in all areas of the community were conducted so that local leaders could point out the positives and negatives that should be considered in development plans. Feedback sessions on the framework continued into this week and a very positive response from the community has been received.

“The approach taken in Manenberg fundamentally shifts government’s delivery model towards one that takes guidance from the needs of the citizens and ensures that both community and public sector leadership are partners in development,” they say.

The proposed transformation of Manenberg is to be achieved through two main interventions: Investment in people and investment in infrastructure.

“After our consultation with the community, a wide range of priority areas have been identified, including investment in the youth, investment in health facilities and investment in safety.

“Our vision is to build a youth lifestyle campus that is structured into six precincts, each with a unique character responding to the needs of the community and surrounding areas. The very nature of a ‘campus’ entails a collection of buildings comprising education facilities and student residences, sport facilities and green open spaces working together as a system,” they explain.

The precincts would include an ecological precinct, a technology and media precinct, an innovation precinct, an economic skills and development precinct, a wellness precinct, a social innovation, highroad precinct and a sport precinct.

“Currently, Manenberg does not embody this, but we intend to change this.”

There are currently 14 primary schools, three high schools, a private centre of excellence and 27 early childhood development centres in Manenberg.

“The schools are typically loosely located on large land parcels where, in most cases, portions of schoolgrounds are undefined and underutilised.

“These grounds have become a risk to pupils as they are often sites for illegal dumping and gang activity. This must change.

“Going forward, we envision a connection of these sites via a promenade to create a learning archipelago: A collection of ‘islands’ or learning hubs.

“Construction will include a safe pedestrian and cycle network, as well as the enhancement of buildings using the urban upgrading project’s ‘active box’ concept. This concept traditionally consists of a structure that is well-lit, visible at all times and has some form of activity, placed as a deterrent on a route that is perceived to be dangerous.

“This assists in making the surroundings a safe space while allowing the community to participate in various activities.

“Overall, this development will shift Manenberg to a safe, stimulating, attractive, vibrant, connected and sustainable neighbourhood.

“In addition to the planned interventions, there are several current initiatives aimed at socio-economic development in Manenberg that need to be highlighted.”

This includes the rehabilitation of Klipfontein Road at a cost of R18m, which is scheduled for completion in November, and the upgrading of parks and installation of new equipment and fencing, including the Manenberg Urban Park, Venster Park, Houw Hoek Road Park, Sherwood Park and Seine Road Park.

It also includes the identification of Manenberg as a priority area for the smart trees programme whereby large trees will be planted during this financial year.

There will also be reading sessions at the Manenberg library for preschool children, as well as holiday programmes at libraries and recreation centres to give pupils an opportunity to expand their social and creative skills.

There will be free internet access in the Manenberg library and a synthetic soccer pitch worth R5.5m which is used daily by male and female teams.

There is also investment in an alcohol and substance abuse treatment site in Ruimte Road, which opened in February this year.

“As you can see, there is much to be done, but we believe that if we rally together as the whole of society, we can transform Manenberg into the vibrant, safe and sustainable community we envision,” they say.

V

What are your thoughts? Starting with the word “Post”, SMS your views to 32516. SMSes cost R1

The City of Cape Town and the Western Cape government have unveiled bold plans to transform Manenberg to uplift the community.

According to a statement by Western Cape premier Helen Zille and mayor Patricia de Lille, Manenberg has been indentified as a priority area for upliftment by the province and the City due to “how deeply and tragically this suburb is affected by urban decay and the resulting crises of drug abuse and gangsterism”.

“The focus will be on advancing safety, edu­cation, healthcare, technology and innovation, while promoting social cohesion and the development of small business opportunities.

“We believe this vision can only be achieved through building social cohesion, participatory planning and partnerships. These are the non-negotiables for successful urban infrastructure development,” they say.

The objective of the transformation is to “improve the quality of life of citizens”.

“Over the past months, the province and City have been involved in an extensive community engagement process in Manenberg and have compiled a community action plan and a public investment framework. The violence prevention through urban upgrading project has been driving it.

“The vision of the people of Manenberg has been central to these plans. Residents want to see Manenberg go from a dormitory area to a safe, secure, diverse, vibrant, innovative, attractive, cohesive and sustainable neighbourhood,” De Lille says.

ParticipationA committee was set up, comprising of community stakeholders from the area, such as youth organisations, NGOs, community-based organisations and the Community Police Forum. Ward committees took part at specific stages as well.

A two-day workshop was held at the end of February to discuss the framework, with at least five sessions around interactive visioning that included large-scale maps with ideas by local leaders being visualised.

“Walk-abouts in all areas of the community were conducted so that local leaders could point out the positives and negatives that should be considered in development plans. Feedback sessions on the framework continued into this week and a very positive response from the community has been received.

“The approach taken in Manenberg fundamentally shifts government’s delivery model towards one that takes guidance from the needs of the citizens and ensures that both community and public sector leadership are partners in development,” they say.

The proposed transformation of Manenberg is to be achieved through two main interventions: Investment in people and investment in infrastructure.

“After our consultation with the community, a wide range of priority areas have been identified, including investment in the youth, investment in health facilities and investment in safety.

“Our vision is to build a youth lifestyle campus that is structured into six precincts, each with a unique character responding to the needs of the community and surrounding areas. The very nature of a ‘campus’ entails a collection of buildings comprising education facilities and student residences, sport facilities and green open spaces.”

The precincts would include an ecological precinct, a technology and media precinct, an innovation precinct, an economic skills and development precinct, a wellness precinct, a social innovation, highroad precinct and a sport precinct.

“Currently, Manenberg does not embody this, but we intend to change this.”

There are currently 14 primary schools, three high schools, a private centre of excellence and 27 early childhood development centres in Manenberg.

“The schools are typically loosely located on large land parcels where, in most cases, portions of schoolgrounds are undefined and underutilised. These grounds have become a risk to pupils as they are often sites for illegal dumping and gang activity. This must change.

Learning hubs“Going forward, we envision a connection of these sites via a promenade to create a learning archipelago: A collection of ‘islands’ or learning hubs.

“Construction will include a safe pedestrian and cycle network, as well as the enhancement of buildings. The concept traditionally consists of a structure that is well-lit, visible at all times and has some form of activity, placed as a deterrent on a route that is perceived to be dangerous. This assists in making the surroundings a safe space.

“Overall, this development will shift Manenberg to a safe, stimulating, attractive, vibrant, connected and sustainable neighbourhood. In addition to the planned interventions, there are several current initiatives aimed at socio-economic development in Manenberg that need to be highlighted.”V

Continued on page 2

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24

 
ADVERTORIAL
Competition regulation for a growing and inclusive economy

ADVERTORIAL: The Competition Commission of South Africa is conducting advocacy work in the South African automotive aftermarket industry and has gazetted a Draft Code of Conduct for public comment.

/News
 

5 top leg exercises for men

Here’s our selection of the five best leg exercises that you can do in the comfort of your own home.

 
 

You won't want to miss...

WATCH: Pornhub is giving users free access to premium content this holidays
5 top leg exercises for men
10 best dressed men of 2017
How to open a beer bottle without an opener
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.