Strong families protect children

2015-06-09 06:01

With the hope of entrenching a culture of action and accountability for children’s rights and protection SOS Children’s Villages are drawing attention to the plight of 11.4m South African children who are living in extreme conditions of poverty, abuse and neglect.

Child Protection Week was celebrated last week.

For over 30 years, SOS Children’s Villages has been providing homes for abandoned and orphaned children in South Africa and implementing family-strengthening programmes within impoverished communities to ensure children don’t fall from their family safety net in the first place.

ExposedMosa Moremi, a children’s rights advocate at SOS Children’s Villages South Africa, explains the burden of HIV/Aids “is tearing apart family structures and leaving our most vulnerable children exposed and devastated”.

“The alarming rates of women abuse is also a very worrying factor, since violence against mothers will have direct and serious consequences for the children living in such a dysfunctional family environment,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages work to protect the rights of orphaned, abandoned and vulnerable children, providing “a loving home” with a family that cares for their needs. Moremi says that unfortunately the demand for this care in South Africa massively surpasses the supply, and the organisation realises that urgent intervention is needed to strengthen family units within the community in order to care for their children.

“Through this realisation, the family-strengthening programme was born. It offers prevention and early intervention service. Our programme is focused on strengthening and rebuilding families within communities with the end objective of self-sufficiency,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages implement and support various programmes including heathcare management, childhood development centres, community awareness campaigns, income-generating projects and workshops to educate community members on how to improve their circumstances.

The community forums bring various community-based organisations and local government services together so that the community can raise concerns about service delivery, safety and other issues.

“Removing a child from parental or family care should be a last resort when it is clear that the child may be in danger of having its rights violated, and where there is no hope of remediation at that time. Our aim is to keep family units together within their communities where this is possible,” says Moremi.

Access to basicsMoremi further says that the reality is that widespread poverty and inequality have left many communities and families in crisis. High levels of unemployment, particularly youth unemployment, low morale, total lack of even the most basic services and rampant corruption are leaving “our poor communities more vulnerable than ever, and in turn, our children are suffering beyond comprehension”.

At a very basic level the family-strength­ening programme, together with its partners, ensures that these families have access to the basics such as food, shelter, clothing, education and access to healthcare and government grants through the various programmes run in the communities.

“Child protection does, however, go much further than providing for the basic needs of the child. We endeavour to educate the community about the dangers lurking in communities for children,” Moremi says.

In these communities “abuse is rife” and many children live through this horror every day, “often perpetrated by others in child-to-child bullying or violence”.

“We inform the community of the steps that can be taken when there is abuse of any nature, whether physical, sexual or substance abuse in their household or a neighbouring household,” explains Moremi.

The awareness campaigns help communities to understand children’s rights and what to do when these rights are violated. They help people to identify potential child abuse cases and protect their children from becoming victims.

“Every step towards improving one person’s life is a step in the right direction and it’s all about caring for each other as human beings on a personal level. There is an opportunity for each and every South African to get involved and make a difference through financial support and by giving their time, skills and mentorship to a child who needs you. Not just during child protection week, but every day,” concludes Moremi.

With the hope of entrenching a culture of action and accountability for children’s rights and protection, SOS Children’s Villages are drawing attention to the plight of 11.4m South African children who are living in extreme conditions of poverty, abuse and neglect.

Child Protection Week was celebrated last week.

For over 30 years, SOS Children’s Villages has been providing homes for abandoned and orphaned children in South Africa and implementing family-strengthening programmes within impoverished communities to ensure children don’t fall from their family safety net in the first place.

ExposedMosa Moremi, a children’s rights advocate at SOS Children’s Villages South Africa, explains the burden of HIV/Aids “is tearing apart family structures and leaving our most vulnerable children exposed”.

“The alarming rates of women abuse is also a very worrying factor, since violence against mothers will have direct and serious consequences for the children living in such a dysfunctional family environment,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages work to protect the rights of orphaned, abandoned and vulnerable children. Moremi says that unfortunately the demand for this care in South Africa massively surpasses the supply, and the organisation realises that urgent intervention is needed to strengthen family units within the community in order to care for their children.

“Through this realisation, the family-strengthening programme was born. It offers prevention and early intervention service. Our programme is focused on strengthening and rebuilding families within communities with the end objective of self-sufficiency,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages implement and support various programmes including heathcare management, childhood development centres, community awareness campaigns, income-generating projects and workshops to educate community members on how to improve their circumstances.

“Removing a child from parental or family care should be a last resort when it is clear that the child may be in danger, and where there is no hope of remediation at that time. Our aim is to keep family units together within their communities where this is possible,” says Moremi.

Access to basicsMoremi further says that the reality is that widespread poverty and inequality have left many communities and families in crisis. High levels of unemployment, particularly youth unemployment, low morale, total lack of even the most basic services and rampant corruption are leaving “our poor communities more vulnerable than ever, and in turn, our children are suffering beyond comprehension”.

At a very basic level the family-strength­ening programme, together with its partners, ensures that these families have access to the basics such as food, shelter, clothing, education and access to healthcare and government grants through the various programmes run.

With the hope of entrenching a culture of action and accountability for children’s rights and protection SOS Children’s Villages are drawing attention to the plight of 11.4m South African children who are living in extreme conditions of poverty, abuse and neglect.

Child Protection Week was celebrated last week.

For over 30 years, SOS Children’s Villages has been providing homes for abandoned and orphaned children in South Africa and implementing family-strengthening programmes within impoverished communities to ensure children don’t fall from their family safety net in the first place.

ExposedMosa Moremi, a children’s rights advocate at SOS Children’s Villages South Africa, explains the burden of HIV/Aids “is tearing apart family structures and leaving our most vulnerable children exposed and devastated”.

“The alarming rates of women abuse is also a very worrying factor, since violence against mothers will have direct and serious consequences for the children living in such a dysfunctional family environment,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages work to protect the rights of orphaned, abandoned and vulnerable children, providing “a loving home” with a family that cares for their needs. Moremi says that unfortunately the demand for this care in South Africa massively surpasses the supply, and the organisation realises that urgent intervention is needed to strengthen family units within the community in order to care for their children.

“Through this realisation, the family-strengthening programme was born. It offers prevention and early intervention service. Our programme is focused on strengthening and rebuilding families within communities with the end objective of self-sufficiency,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages implement and support various programmes including heathcare management, childhood development centres, community awareness campaigns, income-generating projects and workshops to educate community members on how to improve their circumstances.

The community forums bring various community-based organisations and local government services together so that the community can raise concerns about service delivery, safety and other issues.

“Removing a child from parental or family care should be a last resort when it is clear that the child may be in danger of having its rights violated, and where there is no hope of remediation at that time. Our aim is to keep family units together within their communities where this is possible,” says Moremi.

Access to basicsMoremi further says that the reality is that widespread poverty and inequality have left many communities and families in crisis. High levels of unemployment, particularly youth unemployment, low morale, total lack of even the most basic services and rampant corruption are leaving “our poor communities more vulnerable than ever, and in turn, our children are suffering beyond comprehension”.

At a very basic level the family-strength­ening programme, together with its partners, ensures that these families have access to the basics such as food, shelter, clothing, education and access to healthcare and government grants through the various programmes run in the communities.

“Child protection does, however, go much further than providing for the basic needs of the child. We endeavour to educate the community about the dangers lurking in communities for children,” Moremi says.

In these communities “abuse is rife” and many children live through this horror every day, “often perpetrated by others in child-to-child bullying or violence”.

“We inform the community of the steps that can be taken when there is abuse of any nature, whether physical, sexual or substance abuse in their household or a neighbouring household,” explains Moremi.

The awareness campaigns help communities to understand children’s rights and what to do when these rights are violated. They help people to identify potential child abuse cases and protect their children from becoming victims.

“Every step towards improving one person’s life is a step in the right direction and it’s all about caring for each other as human beings on a personal level. There is an opportunity for each and every South African to get involved and make a difference through financial support and by giving their time, skills and mentorship to a child who needs you. Not just during child protection week, but every day,” concludes Moremi.

With the hope of entrenching a culture of action and accountability for children’s rights and protection SOS Children’s Villages are drawing attention to the plight of 11.4m South African children who are living in extreme conditions of poverty, abuse and neglect.

Child Protection Week was celebrated last week.

For over 30 years, SOS Children’s Villages has been providing homes for abandoned and orphaned children in South Africa and implementing family-strengthening programmes within impoverished communities to ensure children don’t fall from their family safety net in the first place.

Mosa Moremi, a children’s rights advocate at SOS Children’s Villages South Africa, explains the burden of HIV/Aids “is tearing apart family structures and leaving our most vulnerable children exposed”.

“The alarming rates of women abuse is also a very worrying factor, since violence against mothers will have direct and serious consequences for the children living in such a dysfunctional family environment,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages work to protect the rights of orphaned, abandoned and vulnerable children, providing homes with families who care. Moremi says that the demand for this care surpasses the supply, and the organisation realises that urgent intervention is needed to strengthen family units within the community.

“Through this realisation, the family-strengthening programme was born. It offers prevention and early intervention service. Our programme is focused on strengthening and rebuilding families within communities with the end objective of self-sufficiency,” Moremi says.

SOS Children’s Villages implement and support various programmes including heathcare management, childhood development centres, community awareness campaigns, income-generating projects and workshops to educate community members on how to improve their circumstances.

The community forums bring various community-based organisations and local government services together so that the community can raise concerns about service delivery, safety and other issues.

“Removing a child from parental or family care should be a last resort when it is clear that the child may be in danger of having its rights violated, and where there is no hope of remediation at that time. Our aim is to keep family units together within their communities where this is possible,” says Moremi.

Moremi further says that the reality is that widespread poverty have left many communities in crisis. High levels of unemployment, low morale, total lack of basic services and rampant corruption are leaving “our poor communities more vulnerable than ever”.

The family-strength­ening programme, together with its partners, ensures that these families have access to basics such as food, shelter, clothing, education and access to healthcare and government grants.

“Child protection does, however, go much further than providing for the basic needs of the child. We endeavour to educate the community about the dangers lurking in communities for children,” Moremi says.

“We inform the community of the steps that can be taken when there is abuse of any nature, whether physical, sexual or substance abuse in their household or a neighbouring household,” explains Moremi

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