Adopt a water safety mindset at the beach

2019-11-21 06:01

For most Capetonians, summer holidays are all about the sun and the sea. But there is another word starting with an “s” that should be at the top of everyone’s list: safety.

The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) urges the public to adopt a water safety mindset around coastal and inland waters this festive season.

Craig Lambinon, spokesperson for Sea Rescue, says the number one rule for a safe experience at the beach, is to choose a beach that has lifeguards on duty and to swim between their flags.

“If you do that, you don’t need to worry about rip currents, or suddenly getting out of your depth. Putting an arm in the air and waving for help will get a rapid response from the lifeguards on duty,” Lambinon says. For various reasons, people regularly swim where there are no lifeguards on duty. This is when things can go wrong.

“In a typical scenario, Sea Rescue gets an emergency call for a swimmer in difficulty. When we get there, we find two or more people in danger of drowning. Tragically, sometimes we are not able to get there in time and someone drowns,” he says.

Lambinon says the person who does not survive is often the one who went into the water to help the person in difficulty.

“Sea Rescue launched our Pink Rescue Buoy project in November 2017. These bright pink rescue buoys are hung on strategically placed signs. If there is an incident and someone needs help these buoys can be thrown to the person in trouble in the water,” he says.

The emergency number for the closest Sea Rescue station is printed on these signs. Lambinon says the safest thing to do is to call Sea Rescue if they see someone in trouble.

“If anyone decides, against advice, to enter the water to try to rescue someone first call Sea Rescue and then use the rescue buoy to provide flotation for the casualty.”

Have a plan in place in the event of an emergency:

. Make sure you have emergency numbers saved on your cellphone. In an emergency, dial 112 from any cellphone. Or Google Sea Rescue or NSRI for the closest Sea Rescue station’s telephone number.

. Check the wind, weather and tides before going to the beach, fishing or boating.

. Tell someone where you are going and when you are due back, and make sure that they know your route, your intentions and who to call if you don’t return on time.

. When climbing on rocks or fishing from rocks, never turn your back on the sea. Rock anglers must wear a life jacket and know when spring high tide is.

. If you are paddling or if you are on a boat, before you launch, download NSRI’s free SafeTrx app – http://www.nsri.org.za/safetrx.

For most Capetonians, summer holidays are all about the sun and the sea. But there is another word starting with an “s” that should be at the top of everyone’s list: safety. The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) urges the public to adopt a water safety mindset around coastal and inland waters this festive season.

Craig Lambinon, spokesperson for Sea Rescue, says the number one rule for a safe experience at the beach, is to choose a beach that has lifeguards on duty and to swim between their flags.

“If you do that, you don’t need to worry about rip currents, or suddenly getting out of your depth. Putting an arm in the air and waving for help will get a rapid response from the lifeguards on duty,” Lambinon says. For various reasons, people regularly swim where there are no lifeguards on duty. This is when things can go wrong.

“In a typical scenario, Sea Rescue gets an emergency call for a swimmer in difficulty. When we get there, we find two or more people in danger of drowning. Tragically, sometimes we are not able to get there in time and someone drowns,” he says.

Lambinon says the person who does not survive is often the one who went into the water to help the person in difficulty.

“Sea Rescue launched our Pink Rescue Buoy project in November 2017. These bright pink rescue buoys are hung on strategically placed signs. If there is an incident and someone needs help these buoys can be thrown to the person in trouble in the water,” he says.

The emergency number for the closest Sea Rescue station is printed on these signs. Lambinon says the safest thing to do is to call Sea Rescue if they see someone in trouble. “If anyone decides, against advice, to enter the water to try to rescue someone first call Sea Rescue and then use the rescue buoy to provide flotation for the casualty.”

Have a plan in place in the event of an emergency:

. Make sure you have emergency numbers saved on your cellphone. In an emergency, dial 112 from any cellphone. Or Google Sea Rescue or NSRI for the closest Sea Rescue station’s telephone number.

. Check the wind, weather and tides before going to the beach, fishing or boating.

. Tell someone where you are going and when you are due back, and make sure that they know your route, your intentions and who to call if you don’t return on time.

. When climbing on rocks or fishing from rocks, never turn your back on the sea. Rock anglers must wear a life jacket and know when spring high tide is.

. If you are paddling or if you are on a boat, before you launch, download NSRI’s free SafeTrx app – http://www.nsri.org.za/safetrx.

For most Capetonians, summer holidays are all about the sun and the sea. But there is another word starting with an “s” that should be at the top of everyone’s list: safety.

The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) urges the public to adopt a water safety mindset around coastal and inland waters this festive season.

Craig Lambinon, spokesperson for Sea Rescue, says the number one rule for a safe experience at the beach, is to choose a beach that has lifeguards on duty and to swim between their flags.

“If you do that, you don’t need to worry about rip currents, or suddenly getting out of your depth. Putting an arm in the air and waving for help will get a rapid response from the lifeguards on duty,” Lambinon says. For various reasons, people regularly swim where there are no lifeguards on duty. This is when things can go wrong.

“In a typical scenario, Sea Rescue gets an emergency call for a swimmer in difficulty. When we get there, we find two or more people in danger of drowning. Tragically, sometimes we are not able to get there in time and someone drowns,” he says.

Lambinon says the person who does not survive is often the one who went into the water to help the person in difficulty.

“Sea Rescue launched our Pink Rescue Buoy project in November 2017. These bright pink rescue buoys are hung on strategically placed signs. If there is an incident and someone needs help these buoys can be thrown to the person in trouble in the water,” he says.

The emergency number for the closest Sea Rescue station is printed on these signs. Lambinon says the safest thing to do is to call Sea Rescue if they see someone in trouble.

“If anyone decides, against advice, to enter the water to try to rescue someone first call Sea Rescue and then use the rescue buoy to provide flotation for the casualty.”

Have a plan in place in the event of an emergency:

. Make sure you have emergency numbers saved on your cellphone. In an emergency, dial 112 from any cellphone. Or Google Sea Rescue or NSRI for the closest Sea Rescue station’s telephone number.

. Check the wind, weather and tides before going to the beach, fishing or boating.

. Tell someone where you are going and when you are due back, and make sure that they know your route, your intentions and who to call if you don’t return on time.

. When climbing on rocks or fishing from rocks, never turn your back on the sea. Rock anglers must wear a life jacket and know when spring high tide is.

. If you are paddling or if you are on a boat, before you launch, download NSRI’s free SafeTrx app – http://www.nsri.org.za/safetrx.

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