Get outlets that sell alcohol out of our neighbourhoods

2017-12-05 06:00

We have once again entered the period of 16 Days of Activism against women and child abuse. It is, however, important to note that these campaigns will not really be effective unless we address its root causes.

One of the key causes in disadvantaged areas is the abuse of alcohol. It is the main substance that keeps food away from the mouths of children, that leads to the assault of women and children and which often causes vulnerable women to commit themselves to, or become involved with, abusive men in the first place. In these areas, alcohol is most commonly obtained from shebeens, taverns and spaza shops.

The biggest problem with these outlets is that they make buying alcohol possible right there where people live, including early in the morning and late at night. The incidence of physical, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse of women and children would have been lower if alcohol was less accessible. Few people would spend money on travelling to distant liquor outlets or make the effort to go to them and they would not be able to buy it after hours.

It should be illegal for a tavern or shebeen to be in a residential area. Many spaza shops and shebeens are even selling liquor without licences, and also to children. The very government that complains of alcoholism that is so rife in disadvantaged areas has issued licences to these outlets. The community in which they operate is usually not consulted when applications for these licences are considered.

People often protest in front of homes known to be drug dens. Why don’t communities also demand the closure of places selling alcohol in residential areas? Places selling liquor should be limited to shopping centres, which cannot be accessed easily after hours. Police often crack down on hawkers selling goods without permits. During the holiday period, police confiscate thousands of litres of alcohol from beachgoers. How often, however, do they have inspections and confiscate alcohol from spaza shops and shebeens selling liquor without valid permits?

Will we ever find that these places are not only fined but even closed down? Will we ever see the day when these outlets are restricted from operating in our neighbourhoods? The public is usually urged to fight against women and child abuse, but what are the departments of social development, community safety and justice and the liquor authority doing about this key contributor to this abuse?

R Bartes Cape Town

We have once again entered the period of 16 Days of Activism against women and child abuse. It is, however, important to note that these campaigns will not really be effective unless we address its root causes.

One of the key causes in disadvantaged areas is the abuse of alcohol. It is the main substance that keeps food away from the mouths of children, that leads to the assault of women and children and which often causes vulnerable women to commit themselves to, or become involved with, abusive men in the first place. In these areas, alcohol is most commonly obtained from shebeens, taverns and spaza shops.

The biggest problem with these outlets is that they make buying alcohol possible right there where people live, including early in the morning and late at night.

The incidence of physical, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse of women and children would have been lower if alcohol was less accessible. Few people would spend money on travelling to distant liquor outlets or make the effort to go to them and they would not be able to buy it after hours.

It should be illegal for a tavern or shebeen to be in a residential area. Many spaza shops and shebeens are even selling liquor without licences, and also to children. The very government that complains of alcoholism that is so rife in disadvantaged areas has issued licences to these outlets. The community in which they operate is usually not consulted when applications for these licences are considered.

People often protest in front of homes known to be drug dens. Why don’t communities also demand the closure of places selling alcohol in residential areas?

Places selling liquor should be limited to shopping centres, which cannot be accessed easily after hours. Police often crack down on hawkers selling goods without permits.

During the holiday period, police confiscate thousands of litres of alcohol from beachgoers. How often, however, do they have inspections and confiscate alcohol from spaza shops and shebeens selling liquor without valid permits?

Will we ever find that these places are not only fined but even closed down? Will we ever see the day when these outlets are restricted from operating in our neighbourhoods?

The public is usually urged to fight against women and child abuse, but what are the departments of social development, community safety and justice and the liquor authority doing about this key contributor to this abuse?

R Bartes Cape Town

We have once again entered the period of 16 Days of Activism against women and child abuse. It is, however, important to note that these campaigns will not really be effective unless we address its root causes.

One of the key causes in disadvantaged areas is the abuse of alcohol. It is the main substance that keeps food away from the mouths of children, that leads to the assault of women and children and which often causes vulnerable women to commit themselves to, or become involved with, abusive men in the first place. In these areas, alcohol is most commonly obtained from shebeens, taverns and spaza shops.

The biggest problem with these outlets is that they make buying alcohol possible right there where people live, including early in the morning and late at night.

The incidence of physical, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse of women and children would have been lower if alcohol was less accessible. Few people would spend money on travelling to distant liquor outlets or make the effort to go to them and they would not be able to buy it after hours.

It should be illegal for a tavern or shebeen to be in a residential area. Many spaza shops and shebeens are even selling liquor without licences, and also to children. The very government that complains of alcoholism that is so rife in disadvantaged areas has issued licences to these outlets. The community in which they operate is usually not consulted when applications for these licences are considered.

People often protest in front of homes known to be drug dens. Why don’t communities also demand the closure of places selling alcohol in residential areas?

Places selling liquor should be limited to shopping centres, which cannot be accessed easily after hours. Police often crack down on hawkers selling goods without permits.

During the holiday period, police confiscate thousands of litres of alcohol from beachgoers. How often, however, do they have inspections and confiscate alcohol from spaza shops and shebeens selling liquor without valid permits?

Will we ever find that these places are not only fined but even closed down? Will we ever see the day when these outlets are restricted from operating in our neighbourhoods?

The public is usually urged to fight against women and child abuse, but what are the departments of social development, community safety and justice and the liquor authority doing about this key contributor to this abuse?

R Bartes Cape Town

We have once again entered the period of 16 Days of Activism against women and child abuse. It is, however, important to note that these campaigns will not really be effective unless we address its root causes.

One of the key causes in disadvantaged areas is the abuse of alcohol. It is the main substance that keeps food away from the mouths of children, that leads to the assault of women and children and which often causes vulnerable women to commit themselves to, or become involved with, abusive men in the first place. In these areas, alcohol is most commonly obtained from shebeens, taverns and spaza shops.

The biggest problem with these outlets is that they make buying alcohol possible right there where people live, including early in the morning and late at night.

The incidence of physical, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse of women and children would have been lower if alcohol was less accessible. Few people would spend money on travelling to distant liquor outlets or make the effort to go to them and they would not be able to buy it after hours.

It should be illegal for a tavern or shebeen to be in a residential area. Many spaza shops and shebeens are even selling liquor without licences, and also to children. The very government that complains of alcoholism that is so rife in disadvantaged areas has issued licences to these outlets. The community in which they operate is usually not consulted when applications for these licences are considered.

People often protest in front of homes known to be drug dens. Why don’t communities also demand the closure of places selling alcohol in residential areas?

Places selling liquor should be limited to shopping centres, which cannot be accessed easily after hours. Police often crack down on hawkers selling goods without permits.

During the holiday period, police confiscate thousands of litres of alcohol from beachgoers. How often, however, do they have inspections and confiscate alcohol from spaza shops and shebeens selling liquor without valid permits?

Will we ever find that these places are not only fined but even closed down? Will we ever see the day when these outlets are restricted from operating in our neighbourhoods?

The public is usually urged to fight against women and child abuse, but what are the departments of social development, community safety and justice and the liquor authority doing about this key contributor to this abuse?

R Bartes Cape Town

We have once again entered the period of 16 Days of Activism against women and child abuse. It is, however, important to note that these campaigns will not really be effective unless we address its root causes.

One of the key causes in disadvantaged areas is the abuse of alcohol. It is the main substance that keeps food away from the mouths of children, that leads to the assault of women and children and which often causes vulnerable women to commit themselves to, or become involved with, abusive men in the first place. In these areas, alcohol is most commonly obtained from shebeens, taverns and spaza shops.

The biggest problem with these outlets is that they make buying alcohol possible right there where people live, including early in the morning and late at night.

The incidence of physical, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse of women and children would have been lower if alcohol was less accessible. Few people would spend money on travelling to distant liquor outlets or make the effort to go to them and they would not be able to buy it after hours.

It should be illegal for a tavern or shebeen to be in a residential area. Many spaza shops and shebeens are even selling liquor without licences, and also to children. The very government that complains of alcoholism that is so rife in disadvantaged areas has issued licences to these outlets. The community in which they operate is usually not consulted when applications for these licences are considered.

People often protest in front of homes known to be drug dens. Why don’t communities also demand the closure of places selling alcohol in residential areas?

Places selling liquor should be limited to shopping centres, which cannot be accessed easily after hours. Police often crack down on hawkers selling goods without permits.

During the holiday period, police confiscate thousands of litres of alcohol from beachgoers. How often, however, do they have inspections and confiscate alcohol from spaza shops and shebeens selling liquor without valid permits?

Will we ever find that these places are not only fined but even closed down? Will we ever see the day when these outlets are restricted from operating in our neighbourhoods?

The public is usually urged to fight against women and child abuse, but what are the departments of social development, community safety and justice and the liquor authority doing about this key contributor to this abuse?

R Bartes Cape Town

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/News
 

Kevin Anderson’s dog is winning at Instagram!

South African tennis player and 2018 Wimbledon finalist Kevin Anderson has a large pool of loyal fans but among the most noticeable is his adorable dog Lady Kady – who even has her own instagram account.

 

Paws

Kim Kardashian-West buys fake testicles to boost her dog’s self-esteem
10 tips on exercising your dog
Our top picks for doggo post of the week
Meet the unstoppable two-legged cat taking over the interwebs!
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.