Irma’s painting goes on auction

2019-06-25 06:00
Irma Stern’s Arab Dhows will be going under the hammer.

Irma Stern’s Arab Dhows will be going under the hammer.

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An evocative Irma Stern painting that was bought from the artist and paid in monthly instalments by a young actress as a gift for her father 80 years ago, and owned by her family ever since, makes its first appearance on the open market The Old Mutual Conference Centre, Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, on Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 July.

This is an auction by The Stephan Welz & Co.

The painting, Arab Dhows, was purchased in 1940 by Barbara Macleod for 12 guineas, which she paid to the artist – scrupulously, according to Irma Stern’s records – in four instalments. The work will be auctioned at the Constantia based Fine Art and Design Auctioneers with an estimated value of R700 000 to R900 000.

Stern (1894 - 1966) painted Arab Dhows in 1939 at the start of what is regarded as her golden period. According to a statement, this was marked by intense productivity during the 1940s when she spent much of her time in Zanzibar and became energised and excited by the exotic life she encountered there.

“She was particularly enthralled by Arab Dhows and the exotic goods their traders brought to the region. The painting was part of a 1940 exhibition in Johannesburg where Ms Macleod bought the work for her father, Lewis Rose Macleod, then editor of the Rand Daily Mail, which went on to become a strong voice in opposition to apartheid,” read the statement.Rare, intimate portraits

Other works likely to attract strong interest from collectors include two watercolours and a hand-written letter by Lady Anne Barnard (1750 – 1825). This fiercely independent Scottish aristocrat came to the Cape of Good Hope in 1797 as the wife of the Colonial Secretary of the Cape Colony. Her African adventures, recorded in her diaries, drawings and paintings, became legendary.

“The two, 220 year old watercolours give us a rare glimpse into the lives of individual women from the under classes of the Cape Colony at the end of the 18th century, and they have been brought to life through ground-breaking new research by historian Tracey Randle who has managed to trace their origins and possible identities by digging deep into the archives,” the statement went on to say.

The paintings on auction, titled Black Madonna and Khoi Woman, are intimate depictions of a young slave woman, known as Theresa, nursing the infant of her master, Jacob van Reenen, and of a woman dressed in the regal sheep skin cloak and beaded adornment of a Khoi chieftainess.

The paintings reflect Barnard’s keen interest in the indigenous people, servants and slaves around her and reveal empathy absent from most other recorders of her times.

The works are accompanied by unique documentary provenance and have been in the possession of the descendants of Barnard from 1966.

They are offered for the first time in over 50 years with a handwritten letter from Barnard to Henry Dundas in 1801. Each painting goes on auction with an estimated value of R50 000 to R80 000.

“These two watercolours by Lady Anne represent not just rare works of art never seen on the market, but a potential archive of marginalised stories yet untapped, untold and unwritten,” says Randle. Blue Heads

Two works by Gerard Sekoto (1913 - 1993) will be on the auction, perhaps the most striking being his Head of an African Woman with its predominantly blue colouring. From 1963 to the mid 1970s, Sekoto repeatedly painted what became known as his ‘blue heads’, a series of busts primarily of women, most frequently with the use of a blue palette.

Before he began painting his first blue heads, Sekoto produced a ballpoint pen on paper sketch of Miriam Makeba, universally acclaimed as the Queen of African Song. The pen drawing of Makeba features the same composition as Sekoto’s blue heads, raising the possibility that it may have been the inspiration for his blue head paintings of African women. Sekoto wrote of his practice of painting the blue heads that he wanted to express the beauty of the women of his own race, as opposed to the white female beauties that he felt were so abundantly portrayed by artists throughout history. Head of an African Woman will be on auction with an estimated value of R600 000 to R900 000.

Viewings for this auction will take place from Friday 28 until Sunday 30 June at 10:00 to 17:00 with the jewellery being packed away at 16:30.

A walkabout with Anton Welz will be on Saturday 29 June at 11:00.

V For more information, visit www.stephanwelzandco.co.za or contact 021 794 6461 or e-mail stephanwelz@stephanwelzandco.co.za.

An evocative Irma Stern painting that was bought from the artist and paid in monthly instalments by a young actress as a gift for her father 80 years ago, and owned by her family ever since, makes its first appearance on the open market The Old Mutual Conference Centre, Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, on Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 July.

This is an auction by The Stephan Welz & Co.

The painting, Arab Dhows, was purchased in 1940 by Barbara Macleod for 12 guineas, which she paid to the artist – scrupulously, according to Irma Stern’s records – in four instalments. The work will be auctioned at the Constantia based Fine Art and Design Auctioneers with an estimated value of R700 000 to R900 000.

Stern (1894 - 1966) painted Arab Dhows in 1939 at the start of what is regarded as her golden period. According to a statement, this was marked by intense productivity during the 1940s when she spent much of her time in Zanzibar and became energised and excited by the exotic life she encountered there.

“She was particularly enthralled by Arab Dhows and the exotic goods their traders brought to the region. The painting was part of a 1940 exhibition in Johannesburg where Ms Macleod bought the work for her father, Lewis Rose Macleod, then editor of the Rand Daily Mail, which went on to become a strong voice in opposition to apartheid,” read the statement.Rare, intimate portraits

Other works likely to attract strong interest from collectors include two watercolours and a hand-written letter by Lady Anne Barnard (1750 – 1825). This fiercely independent Scottish aristocrat came to the Cape of Good Hope in 1797 as the wife of the Colonial Secretary of the Cape Colony. Her African adventures, recorded in her diaries, drawings and paintings, became legendary.

“The two, 220 year old watercolours give us a rare glimpse into the lives of individual women from the under classes of the Cape Colony at the end of the 18th century, and they have been brought to life through ground-breaking new research by historian Tracey Randle who has managed to trace their origins and possible identities by digging deep into the archives,” the statement went on to say.

The paintings on auction, titled Black Madonna and Khoi Woman, are intimate depictions of a young slave woman, known as Theresa, nursing the infant of her master, Jacob van Reenen, and of a woman dressed in the regal sheep skin cloak and beaded adornment of a Khoi chieftainess.

The paintings reflect Barnard’s keen interest in the indigenous people, servants and slaves around her and reveal empathy absent from most other recorders of her times.

The works are accompanied by unique documentary provenance and have been in the possession of the descendants of Barnard from 1966.

They are offered for the first time in over 50 years with a handwritten letter from Barnard to Henry Dundas in 1801. Each painting goes on auction with an estimated value of R50 000 to R80 000.

“These two watercolours by Lady Anne represent not just rare works of art never seen on the market, but a potential archive of marginalised stories yet untapped, untold and unwritten,” says Randle. Blue Heads

Two works by Gerard Sekoto (1913 - 1993) will be on the auction, perhaps the most striking being his Head of an African Woman with its predominantly blue colouring. From 1963 to the mid 1970s, Sekoto repeatedly painted what became known as his ‘blue heads’, a series of busts primarily of women, most frequently with the use of a blue palette.

Before he began painting his first blue heads, Sekoto produced a ballpoint pen on paper sketch of Miriam Makeba, universally acclaimed as the Queen of African Song. The pen drawing of Makeba features the same composition as Sekoto’s blue heads, raising the possibility that it may have been the inspiration for his blue head paintings of African women.

Sekoto wrote of his practice of painting the blue heads that he wanted to express the beauty of the women of his own race, as opposed to the white female beauties that he felt were so abundantly portrayed by artists throughout history. Head of an African Woman will be on auction with an estimated value of R600 000 to R900 000.

Viewings for this auction will take place from Friday 28 until Sunday 30 June at 10:00 to 17:00 with the jewellery being packed away at 16:30.

A walkabout with Anton Welz will be on Saturday 29 June at 11:00.

V For more information, visit www.stephanwelzandco.co.za or contact 021 794 6461 or e-mail stephanwelz@stephanwelzandco.co.za.

An evocative Irma Stern painting that was bought from the artist and paid in monthly instalments by a young actress as a gift for her father 80 years ago, and owned by her family ever since, makes its first appearance on the open market The Old Mutual Conference Centre, Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, on Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 July.

This is an auction by The Stephan Welz & Co.

The painting, Arab Dhows, was purchased in 1940 by Barbara Macleod for 12 guineas, which she paid to the artist – scrupulously, according to Irma Stern’s records – in four instalments. The work will be auctioned at the Constantia based Fine Art and Design Auctioneers with an estimated value of R700 000 to R900 000.

Stern (1894 - 1966) painted Arab Dhows in 1939 at the start of what is regarded as her golden period. According to a statement, this was marked by intense productivity during the 1940s when she spent much of her time in Zanzibar and became energised and excited by the exotic life she encountered there.

“She was particularly enthralled by Arab Dhows and the exotic goods their traders brought to the region. The painting was part of a 1940 exhibition in Johannesburg where Ms Macleod bought the work for her father, Lewis Rose Macleod, then editor of the Rand Daily Mail, which went on to become a strong voice in opposition to apartheid,” read the statement.

Other works likely to attract strong interest from collectors include two watercolours and a hand-written letter by Lady Anne Barnard (1750 – 1825). This fiercely independent Scottish aristocrat came to the Cape of Good Hope in 1797 as the wife of the Colonial Secretary of the Cape Colony. Her African adventures, recorded in her diaries, drawings and paintings, became legendary.

“The two, 220 year old watercolours give us a rare glimpse into the lives of individual women from the under classes of the Cape Colony at the end of the 18th century, and they have been brought to life through ground-breaking new research by historian Tracey Randle who has managed to trace their origins and possible identities by digging deep into the archives,” the statement went on to say.

The paintings on auction, titled Black Madonna and Khoi Woman, are intimate depictions of a young slave woman, known as Theresa, nursing the infant of her master, Jacob van Reenen, and of a woman dressed in the regal sheep skin cloak and beaded adornment of a Khoi chieftainess.

The paintings reflect Barnard’s keen interest in the indigenous people, servants and slaves around her and reveal empathy absent from most other recorders of her times.

The works are accompanied by unique documentary provenance and have been in the possession of the descendants of Barnard from 1966.

They are offered for the first time in over 50 years with a handwritten letter from Barnard to Henry Dundas in 1801. Each painting goes on auction with an estimated value of R50 000 to R80 000.

“These two watercolours by Lady Anne represent not just rare works of art never seen on the market, but a potential archive of marginalised stories yet untapped, untold and unwritten,” says Randle.

Two works by Gerard Sekoto (1913 - 1993) will be on the auction, perhaps the most striking being his Head of an African Woman with its predominantly blue colouring. From 1963 to the mid 1970s, Sekoto repeatedly painted what became known as his ‘blue heads’, a series of busts primarily of women, most frequently with the use of a blue palette.

Before he began painting his first blue heads, Sekoto produced a ballpoint pen on paper sketch of Miriam Makeba, universally acclaimed as the Queen of African Song. The pen drawing of Makeba features the same composition as Sekoto’s blue heads, raising the possibility that it may have been the inspiration for his blue head paintings of African women. Sekoto wrote of his practice of painting the blue heads that he wanted to express the beauty of the women of his own race, as opposed to the white female beauties that he felt were so abundantly portrayed by artists throughout history. Head of an African Woman will be on auction with an estimated value of R600 000 to R900 000.

Viewings for this auction will take place from Friday 28 until Sunday 30 June at 10:00 to 17:00 with the jewellery being packed away at 16:30.

A walkabout with Anton Welz will be on Saturday 29 June at 11:00.

V For more information, visit www.stephanwelzandco.co.za or contact 021 794 6461 or e-mail stephanwelz@stephanwelzandco.co.za.

An evocative Irma Stern painting that was bought from the artist and paid in monthly instalments by a young actress as a gift for her father 80 years ago, and owned by her family ever since, makes its first appearance on the open market The Old Mutual Conference Centre, Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, on Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 July.

This is an auction by The Stephan Welz & Co.

The painting, Arab Dhows, was purchased in 1940 by Barbara Macleod for 12 guineas, which she paid to the artist – scrupulously, according to Irma Stern’s records – in four instalments. The work will be auctioned at the Constantia based Fine Art and Design Auctioneers with an estimated value of R700 000 to R900 000.

Stern (1894 - 1966) painted Arab Dhows in 1939 at the start of what is regarded as her golden period. According to a statement, this was marked by intense productivity during the 1940s when she spent much of her time in Zanzibar and became energised and excited by the exotic life she encountered there.

“She was particularly enthralled by Arab Dhows and the exotic goods their traders brought to the region. The painting was part of a 1940 exhibition in Johannesburg where Ms Macleod bought the work for her father, Lewis Rose Macleod, then editor of the Rand Daily Mail, which went on to become a strong voice in opposition to apartheid,” read the statement.Rare, intimate portraits

Other works likely to attract strong interest from collectors include two watercolours and a hand-written letter by Lady Anne Barnard (1750 – 1825). This fiercely independent Scottish aristocrat came to the Cape of Good Hope in 1797 as the wife of the Colonial Secretary of the Cape Colony. Her African adventures, recorded in her diaries, drawings and paintings, became legendary.

“The two, 220 year old watercolours give us a rare glimpse into the lives of individual women from the under classes of the Cape Colony at the end of the 18th century, and they have been brought to life through ground-breaking new research by historian Tracey Randle who has managed to trace their origins and possible identities by digging deep into the archives,” the statement went on to say.

The paintings on auction, titled Black Madonna and Khoi Woman, are intimate depictions of a young slave woman, known as Theresa, nursing the infant of her master, Jacob van Reenen, and of a woman dressed in the regal sheep skin cloak and beaded adornment of a Khoi chieftainess.

The paintings reflect Barnard’s keen interest in the indigenous people, servants and slaves around her and reveal empathy absent from most other recorders of her times.

The works are accompanied by unique documentary provenance and have been in the possession of the descendants of Barnard from 1966.

They are offered for the first time in over 50 years with a handwritten letter from Barnard to Henry Dundas in 1801. Each painting goes on auction with an estimated value of R50 000 to R80 000.

“These two watercolours by Lady Anne represent not just rare works of art never seen on the market, but a potential archive of marginalised stories yet untapped, untold and unwritten,” says Randle. Blue Heads

Two works by Gerard Sekoto (1913 - 1993) will be on the auction, perhaps the most striking being his Head of an African Woman with its predominantly blue colouring. From 1963 to the mid 1970s, Sekoto repeatedly painted what became known as his ‘blue heads’, a series of busts primarily of women, most frequently with the use of a blue palette.

Before he began painting his first blue heads, Sekoto produced a ballpoint pen on paper sketch of Miriam Makeba, universally acclaimed as the Queen of African Song. The pen drawing of Makeba features the same composition as Sekoto’s blue heads, raising the possibility that it may have been the inspiration for his blue head paintings of African women.

Sekoto wrote of his practice of painting the blue heads that he wanted to express the beauty of the women of his own race, as opposed to the white female beauties that he felt were so abundantly portrayed by artists throughout history. Head of an African Woman will be on auction with an estimated value of R600 000 to R900 000.

Viewings for this auction will take place from Friday 28 until Sunday 30 June at 10:00 to 17:00 with the jewellery being packed away at 16:30.

A walkabout with Anton Welz will be on Saturday 29 June at 11:00.

V For more information, visit www.stephanwelzandco.co.za or contact 021 794 6461 or e-mail stephanwelz@stephanwelzandco.co.za.

An evocative Irma Stern painting that was bought from the artist and paid in monthly instalments by a young actress as a gift for her father 80 years ago, and owned by her family ever since, makes its first appearance on the open market The Old Mutual Conference Centre, Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, on Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 July.

This is an auction by The Stephan Welz & Co.

The painting, Arab Dhows, was purchased in 1940 by Barbara Macleod for 12 guineas, which she paid to the artist – scrupulously, according to Irma Stern’s records – in four instalments. The work will be auctioned at the Constantia based Fine Art and Design Auctioneers with an estimated value of R700 000 to R900 000.

Stern (1894 - 1966) painted Arab Dhows in 1939 at the start of what is regarded as her golden period. According to a statement, this was marked by intense productivity during the 1940s when she spent much of her time in Zanzibar and became energised and excited by the exotic life she encountered there.

“She was particularly enthralled by Arab Dhows and the exotic goods their traders brought to the region. The painting was part of a 1940 exhibition in Johannesburg where Ms Macleod bought the work for her father, Lewis Rose Macleod, then editor of the Rand Daily Mail, which went on to become a strong voice in opposition to apartheid,” read the statement.Rare, intimate portraits

Other works likely to attract strong interest from collectors include two watercolours and a hand-written letter by Lady Anne Barnard (1750 – 1825). This fiercely independent Scottish aristocrat came to the Cape of Good Hope in 1797 as the wife of the Colonial Secretary of the Cape Colony. Her African adventures, recorded in her diaries, drawings and paintings, became legendary.

“The two, 220 year old watercolours give us a rare glimpse into the lives of individual women from the under classes of the Cape Colony at the end of the 18th century, and they have been brought to life through ground-breaking new research by historian Tracey Randle who has managed to trace their origins and possible identities by digging deep into the archives,” the statement went on to say.

The paintings on auction, titled Black Madonna and Khoi Woman, are intimate depictions of a young slave woman, known as Theresa, nursing the infant of her master, Jacob van Reenen, and of a woman dressed in the regal sheep skin cloak and beaded adornment of a Khoi chieftainess.

The paintings reflect Barnard’s keen interest in the indigenous people, servants and slaves around her and reveal empathy absent from most other recorders of her times.

The works are accompanied by unique documentary provenance and have been in the possession of the descendants of Barnard from 1966.

They are offered for the first time in over 50 years with a handwritten letter from Barnard to Henry Dundas in 1801. Each painting goes on auction with an estimated value of R50 000 to R80 000.

“These two watercolours by Lady Anne represent not just rare works of art never seen on the market, but a potential archive of marginalised stories yet untapped, untold and unwritten,” says Randle. Blue Heads

Two works by Gerard Sekoto (1913 - 1993) will be on the auction, perhaps the most striking being his Head of an African Woman with its predominantly blue colouring. From 1963 to the mid 1970s, Sekoto repeatedly painted what became known as his ‘blue heads’, a series of busts primarily of women, most frequently with the use of a blue palette.

Before he began painting his first blue heads, Sekoto produced a ballpoint pen on paper sketch of Miriam Makeba, universally acclaimed as the Queen of African Song. The pen drawing of Makeba features the same composition as Sekoto’s blue heads, raising the possibility that it may have been the inspiration for his blue head paintings of African women.

Sekoto wrote of his practice of painting the blue heads that he wanted to express the beauty of the women of his own race, as opposed to the white female beauties that he felt were so abundantly portrayed by artists throughout history. Head of an African Woman will be on auction with an estimated value of R600 000 to R900 000.

Viewings for this auction will take place from Friday 28 until Sunday 30 June at 10:00 to 17:00 with the jewellery being packed away at 16:30.

A walkabout with Anton Welz will be on Saturday 29 June at 11:00.

V For more information, visit www.stephanwelzandco.co.za or contact 021 794 6461 or e-mail stephanwelz@stephanwelzandco.co.za.

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