Keep a lookout for little turtles

2018-05-08 06:00
Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation. PHOTO: Devon Bowen

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation. PHOTO: Devon Bowen

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Over a dozen juvenile turtles have already been stranded on local beaches, in only the first month of the loggerhead turtle hatchling season.

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation.

These hatchlings are successfully rescued from the Cape’s coasts and dropped off at turtle rescue network points for quick transport to the Two Oceans Aquarium’s rehabilitation clinic.

“The public has so far helped to rescue 15 loggerhead turtle hatchlings and transport them to the aquarium’s rehab clinic. Twelve of these tiny hatchlings are still in our care – unfortunately, two of the little ones were too injured to survive and passed away shortly after their arrival,” explains aquarium spokesperson Renée Leeuwner.

Every year, dozens of young turtles wash up on Cape beaches, cold, tired and close to death. When found, the turtles are usually very weak, barely moving and have injured flippers. Many of the baby turtles have also swallowed plastic (“Tiny turtles found on local beach”, People’s Post, 9 May 2017).

For the first year of a turtle’s life, they are incredibly vulnerable. Only one in 1000 hatchlings survives. Juvenile turtles (mainly loggerheads) are swept down from the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal (where they hatch) in the Agulhas Current and are washed ashore by stormy seas. They are often in a weak condition, having been exposed to cold water, and are suffering from dehydration.

On admission at the rehabilitation centre, each turtle is weighed, measured and their condition assessed. They are then cleaned with a baby toothbrush to remove any algae and fungi clinging to them. Once cleaned, they are placed in a freshwater bath and warm water is slowly added. The length of each turtle’s recovery depends on their condition. However, not all of them make it – the weakest or those with underlying injuries will usually die within a few days.

The aquarium saves and releases over 75% of the turtles brought to the rehabilitation centre. Saving as many turtles as possible is vital to conserving the endangered species. All seven species of sea turtles are considered endangered.

Stranded turtles: What to do

The turtles you may come across are most likely hatchlings and the size of your hand. Sea turtles, being temperate-water animals, don’t fare well in our icy Cape waters and it is crucial that they get help as quickly as possible.

. Remove the turtle from the beach and do not return the turtle to the sea.

. Keep it dry and at room temperature – do not place the turtle in water.

. Place the turtle in a container that has ample air holes.

. Contact the aquarium on 021 418 3823.

. Make a note of exactly where the turtle was found.

Over a dozen juvenile turtles have already been stranded on local beaches, in only the first month of the loggerhead turtle hatchling season.

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation.

These hatchlings are successfully rescued from the Cape’s coasts and dropped off at turtle rescue network points for quick transport to the Two Oceans Aquarium’s rehabilitation clinic.

“The public has so far helped to rescue 15 loggerhead turtle hatchlings and transport them to the aquarium’s rehab clinic. Twelve of these tiny hatchlings are still in our care – unfortunately, two of the little ones were too injured to survive and passed away shortly after their arrival,” explains aquarium spokesperson Renée Leeuwner.

Every year, dozens of young turtles wash up on Cape beaches, cold, tired and close to death. When found, the turtles are usually very weak, barely moving and have injured flippers. Many of the baby turtles have also swallowed plastic (“Tiny turtles found on local beach”, People’s Post, 9 May 2017).

For the first year of a turtle’s life, they are incredibly vulnerable. Only one in 1000 hatchlings survives. Juvenile turtles (mainly loggerheads) are swept down from the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal (where they hatch) in the Agulhas Current and are washed ashore by stormy seas. They are often in a weak condition, having been exposed to cold water, and are suffering from dehydration.

On admission at the rehabilitation centre, each turtle is weighed, measured and their condition assessed. They are then cleaned with a baby toothbrush to remove any algae and fungi clinging to them. Once cleaned, they are placed in a freshwater bath and warm water is slowly added. The length of each turtle’s recovery depends on their condition. However, not all of them make it – the weakest or those with underlying injuries will usually die within a few days.

The aquarium saves and releases over 75% of the turtles brought to the rehabilitation centre. Saving as many turtles as possible is vital to conserving the endangered species.

All seven species of sea turtles are consiered
endangered.

Stranded turtles: What to do

The turtles you may come across are most likely hatchlings and the size of your hand. Sea turtles, being temperate-water animals, don’t fare well in our icy Cape waters and it is crucial that they get help as quickly as possible.

. Remove the turtle from the beach and do not return the turtle to the sea.

. Keep it dry and at room temperature – do not place the turtle in water.

. Place the turtle in a container that has ample air holes.

. Contact the aquarium on 021 418 3823.

. Make a note of exactly where the turtle was found.

Over a dozen juvenile turtles have already been stranded on local beaches, in only the first month of the loggerhead turtle hatchling season.

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation.

These hatchlings are successfully rescued from the Cape’s coasts and dropped off at turtle rescue network points for quick transport to the Two Oceans Aquarium’s rehabilitation clinic.

“The public has so far helped to rescue 15 loggerhead turtle hatchlings and transport them to the aquarium’s rehab clinic. Twelve of these tiny hatchlings are still in our care – unfortunately, two of the little ones were too injured to survive and passed away shortly after their arrival,” explains aquarium spokesperson Renée Leeuwner.

Every year, dozens of young turtles wash up on Cape beaches, cold, tired and close to death. When found, the turtles are usually very weak, barely moving and have injured flippers. Many of the baby turtles have also swallowed plastic (“Tiny turtles found on local beach”, People’s Post, 9 May 2017).

For the first year of a turtle’s life, they are incredibly vulnerable. Only one in 1000 hatchlings survives. Juvenile turtles (mainly loggerheads) are swept down from the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal (where they hatch) in the Agulhas Current and are washed ashore by stormy seas. They are often in a weak condition, having been exposed to cold water, and are suffering from dehydration.

On admission at the rehabilitation centre, each turtle is weighed, measured and their condition assessed. They are then cleaned with a baby toothbrush to remove any algae and fungi clinging to them. Once cleaned, they are placed in a freshwater bath and warm water is slowly added. The length of each turtle’s recovery depends on their condition. However, not all of them make it – the weakest or those with underlying injuries will usually die within a few days.

The aquarium saves and releases over 75% of the turtles brought to the rehabilitation centre. Saving as many turtles as possible is vital to conserving the endangered species. All seven species of sea turtles are considered endangered.

Stranded turtles: What to do

The turtles you may come across are most likely hatchlings and the size of your hand. Sea turtles, being temperate-water animals, don’t fare well in our icy Cape waters and it is crucial that they get help as quickly as possible.

. Remove the turtle from the beach and do not return the turtle to the sea.

. Keep it dry and at room temperature – do not place the turtle in water.

. Place the turtle in a container that has ample air holes.

. Contact the aquarium on 021 418 3823.

. Make a note of exactly where the turtle was found.

Over a dozen juvenile turtles have already been stranded on local beaches, in only the first month of the loggerhead turtle hatchling
season.

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation.

These hatchlings are successfully rescued from the Cape’s coasts and dropped off at turtle rescue network points for quick transport to the Two Oceans Aquarium’s rehabilitation clinic.

“The public has so far helped to rescue 15 loggerhead turtle hatchlings and transport them to the aquarium’s rehab clinic. Twelve of these tiny hatchlings are still in our care – unfortunately, two of the little ones were too injured to survive and passed away shortly after their arrival,” explains aquarium spokesperson Renée Leeuwner.

Every year, dozens of young turtles wash up on Cape beaches, cold, tired and close to death. When found, the turtles are usually very weak, barely moving and have injured flippers. Many of the baby turtles have also swallowed plastic (“Tiny turtles found on local beach”, People’s Post, 9 May 2017).

For the first year of a turtle’s life, they are incredibly vulnerable. Only one in 1000 hatchlings survives. Juvenile turtles (mainly loggerheads) are swept down from the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal (where they hatch) in the Agulhas Current and are washed ashore by stormy seas. They are often in a weak condition, having been exposed to cold water, and are suffering from dehydration.

On admission at the rehabilitation centre, each turtle is weighed, measured and their condition assessed. They are then cleaned with a baby toothbrush to remove any algae and fungi clinging to them. Once cleaned, they are placed in a freshwater bath and warm water is slowly added. The length of each turtle’s recovery depends on their condition. However, not all of them make it – the weakest or those with underlying injuries will usually die within a few days.

The aquarium saves and releases over 75% of the turtles brought to the rehabilitation centre. Saving as many turtles as possible is vital to conserving the endangered species. All seven species of sea turtles are considered endangered.

Stranded turtles: What to do

The turtles you may come across are most likely hatchlings and the size of your hand. Sea turtles, being temperate-water animals, don’t fare well in our icy Cape waters and it is crucial that they get help as quickly as possible.

. Remove the turtle from the beach and do not return the turtle to the sea.

. Keep it dry and at room temperature – do not place the turtle in
water.

. Place the turtle in a container that has ample air holes.

. Contact the aquarium on 021 418 3823.

. Make a note of exactly where the turtle was found.

Over a dozen juvenile turtles have already been stranded on local beaches, in only the first month of the loggerhead turtle hatchling season.

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation.

These hatchlings are successfully rescued from the Cape’s coasts and dropped off at turtle rescue network points for quick transport to the Two Oceans Aquarium’s rehabilitation clinic.

“The public has so far helped to rescue 15 loggerhead turtle hatchlings and transport them to the aquarium’s rehab clinic. Twelve of these tiny hatchlings are still in our care – unfortunately, two of the little ones were too injured to survive and passed away shortly after their arrival,” explains aquarium spokesperson Renée Leeuwner.

Every year, dozens of young turtles wash up on Cape beaches, cold, tired and close to death. When found, the turtles are usually very weak, barely moving and have injured flippers. Many of the baby turtles have also swallowed plastic (“Tiny turtles found on local beach”, People’s Post, 9 May 2017).

For the first year of a turtle’s life, they are incredibly vulnerable. Only one in 1000 hatchlings survives.

Juvenile turtles (mainly loggerheads) are swept down from the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal (where they hatch) in the Agulhas Current and are washed ashore by stormy seas. They are often in a weak condition, having been exposed to cold water, and are suffering from dehydration.

On admission at the rehabilitation centre, each turtle is weighed, measured and their condition assessed. They are then cleaned with a baby toothbrush to remove any algae and fungi clinging to them.

Once cleaned, they are placed in a freshwater bath and warm water is slowly added. The length of each turtle’s recovery depends on their condition. However, not all of them make it – the weakest or those with underlying injuries will usually die within a few days.

The aquarium saves and releases over 75% of the turtles brought to the rehabilitation centre.

Saving as many turtles as possible is vital to conserving the endangered species. All seven species of sea turtles are considered endangered.

Stranded turtles: What to do

The turtles you may come across are most likely hatchlings and the size of your hand. Sea turtles, being temperate-water animals, don’t fare well in our icy Cape waters and it is crucial that they get help as quickly as possible.

. Remove the turtle from the beach and do not return the turtle to the sea.

. Keep it dry and at room temperature – do not place the turtle in water.

. Place the turtle in a container that has ample air holes.

. Contact the aquarium on 021 418 3823.

. Make a note of exactly where the turtle was found.

Over a dozen juvenile turtles have already been stranded on local beaches, in only the first month of the loggerhead turtle hatchling season.

Between April and June, stranded juvenile loggerhead turtles are brought to the Two Oceans Aquarium for rehabilitation.

These hatchlings are successfully rescued from the Cape’s coasts and dropped off at turtle rescue network points for quick transport to the Two Oceans Aquarium’s rehabilitation clinic.

“The public has so far helped to rescue 15 loggerhead turtle hatchlings and transport them to the aquarium’s rehab clinic. Twelve of these tiny hatchlings are still in our care – unfortunately, two of the little ones were too injured to survive and passed away shortly after their arrival,” explains aquarium spokesperson Renée Leeuwner.

Every year, dozens of young turtles wash up on Cape beaches, cold, tired and close to death. When found, the turtles are usually very weak, barely moving and have injured flippers. Many of the baby turtles have also swallowed plastic (“Tiny turtles found on local beach”, People’s Post, 9 May 2017).

For the first year of a turtle’s life, they are incredibly vulnerable. Only one in 1000 hatchlings survives.

Juvenile turtles (mainly loggerheads) are swept down from the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal (where they hatch) in the Agulhas Current and are washed ashore by stormy seas. They are often in a weak condition, having been exposed to cold water, and are suffering from dehydration.

On admission at the rehabilitation centre, each turtle is weighed, measured and their condition assessed. They are then cleaned with a baby toothbrush to remove any algae and fungi clinging to them.

Once cleaned, they are placed in a freshwater bath and warm water is slowly added. The length of each turtle’s recovery depends on their condition. However, not all of them make it – the weakest or those with underlying injuries will usually die within a few days.

The aquarium saves and releases over 75% of the turtles brought to the rehabilitation centre.

Saving as many turtles as possible is vital to conserving the endangered species. All seven species of sea turtles are considered endangered.

Stranded turtles: What to do

The turtles you may come across are most likely hatchlings and the size of your hand. Sea turtles, being temperate-water animals, don’t fare well in our icy Cape waters and it is crucial that they get help as quickly as possible.

. Remove the turtle from the beach and do not return the turtle to the sea.

. Keep it dry and at room temperature – do not place the turtle in water.

. Place the turtle in a container that has ample air holes.

. Contact the aquarium on 021 418 3823.

. Make a note of exactly where the turtle was found.

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