Live plastic free this July

2018-06-26 06:00

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”. The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill. Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more. “We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Every day during July, the aquarium will host a special interactive presentation on plastics in the ocean. The talk will take place daily at 16:00 at the I&J Ocean Exhibit.V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”. The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill.

Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more. “We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”.

The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill.

Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more.

“We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours.

“We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Every day during July, the aquarium will host a special interactive presentation on plastics in the ocean. The talk will take place daily at 16:00 at the I&J Ocean Exhibit.V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”. The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill.

Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more.

“We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish.

Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”. The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill.

Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more. “We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”. The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill. Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more. “We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Every day during July, the aquarium will host a special interactive presentation on plastics in the ocean. The talk will take place daily at 16:00 at the I&J Ocean Exhibit.V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”. The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill.

Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more. “We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

As Plastic-Free July approaches, Capetonians are urged to recycle – and they could stand a chance to win a one-of-a-kind prize.

This year’s theme for the International Plastic-Free July campaign is “Beat Plastic Pollution”.

The Two Oceans Aquarium challenges everyone to refuse the top four single-use plastics: Plastic shopping bags, straws, takeaway containers and plastic water bottles. Participants are encouraged to make the pledge on the website, or share it with the aquarium on its social media platforms.

International Plastic Bag-Free Day is on Tuesday 3 July.

During next month, the Two Oceans Aquarium will use its extended platforms to further mobilise individuals, communities, retailers, restaurants, businesses and other stakeholders to commit to stemming the tide of plastic that is choking the oceans.

The aquarium is also doing a massive eco-brick drive in aid of Waste-ED’s “Building a Future” programme. Waste-ED needs 1000 eco-bricks to build an outdoor learning space for Levana Primary School in Lavender Hill.

Eco-bricks are plastic bottles packed tightly with non-biodegradable waste. These bottles are then used as building materials to create sustainable homes, schools and furniture­.

By bringing in an eco-brick, aquarium visitors will be entered into a lucky draw for a prize worth R18 500, which includes aquarium membership and experiences, a high-end Sealand Gear upcycled bag, tickets to top Cape Town attractions, vouchers and much more.

“We live in a time where throwing things away has become all too commonplace. The problem is that no-one has been able to tell me where this ‘away’ is, and that’s because everything we throw ‘away’ stays on this amazing planet of ours. We all need to use less single-use plastic and rather reuse what we have, over and over. This makes reusable shopping bags so ideal. Consumers using them can proudly say that they are not contributing to landfill and litter in the environment, including the oceans,” says Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Plastic breaks up into smaller and smaller pieces, explains McLellan. It also breaks up into the food chain, and as it moves through the chain, it accumulates until it reaches the highest animal in this chain – humans.

Plastic is also finding its way into the oceans of the world at an alarming rate. Scientists are predicting that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. Considering that 80% of litter in the ocean originates from land, this is definitely a problem that needs to be tackled at the source. This problem is greatly amplified when one considers that about half of all plastic manufactured consists of single-use items. V Every day during July, the aquarium will host a special interactive presentation on plastics in the ocean. The talk will take place daily at 16:00 at the I&J Ocean Exhibit.V Eco-bricks can be dropped off at the aquarium’s Visitor Services Centre from Sunday 1 to Tuesday 31 July between 09:30 and 18:00.

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/World
 

Meet the unstoppable two-legged cat taking over the interwebs!

She may only have two legs, but that hasn’t stopped her from gaining thousands of adoring fans!

 

Paws

10 foods you should NEVER feed your dog!
Pet owners are spending thousands on animal birthday parties! Here’s why…
WOOF Project: The pop-up dog adoption station
Just 10 cats hanging out in boxes - because they're awesome
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.